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X-37B preparing for launch

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posted on Aug, 23 2017 @ 11:52 PM
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The next X-37B mission, OTV-5, is being preparedfor launch early in September. This will be the first launch on board a Falcon 9 rocket.

One of the experiments being flown is the AFRL ASETS-11 which will test experimental electronics and oscillating heat pipes on a long duration space mission.

www.airguideonline.com...




posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 12:22 AM
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Too cool Zaph

Found this on Space.com

Zoom zoom

www.space.com...



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 12:34 AM
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So what's the consensus on the X37? Is it merely a convenient, low-cost shuttle craft?

Or has there ever been any wind of it being used for military purposes?



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 12:35 AM
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a reply to: Tempter

They're testing a number of new technologies and trying some things to advance other technologies.



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 12:48 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Tempter

They're testing a number of new technologies and trying some things to advance other technologies.


As vague as I thought.


Thanks?



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: Tempter

It is what it is. There are clues as to some things they're doing, and they talk about some experiments, but as with most classified programs there isn't a straight, clear answer.



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 01:30 AM
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a reply to: Tempter

Lol, you got what you asked for.

Sorry Tempter, just normal replies. Had to laugh at the response.

kind regards,

bally



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 04:26 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Tempter

It is what it is. There are clues as to some things they're doing, and they talk about some experiments, but as with most classified programs there isn't a straight, clear answer.

Military...



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 05:06 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I wonder how many tungsten telephone poles they have hauled into orbit with that thing.



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: Bramble Iceshimmer

That's why they have the Falcon

You couldn't fit a phone booth inside the 37b



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

bs
its an orbital bomber of the "rods of god" type



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: humanoidlord

Bull. It has the payload bay the size of a pickup truck bed. And Rods are laughable as a weapon system. It couldn't even carry one, let alone many of them.



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Exactly. The rods from god idea is just retarded.
For the concept to work you need a very heavy material which means you end up with a small but insanely heavy payload with disappointing destructive poiwer.
The original concept proposed a long dart weighting more than 9 tons. This means you'd need a Delta IV HLV to get more than a one shot weapon into orbit. And for what? The kinetic energy released by the impact of a 9 ton tungsten dart from orbit equals 11.5 tons of TNT. Thats the blast yield of a single GBU-43. Yay.
If you want to have this capability, just use an ICBM a 1ton payload with an reentry speed of 30.000km/h results in the equivalent of 8tons of TNT. Just make sure to inform any nuclear armed nations before launching.
edit on 24-8-2017 by mightmight because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Tempter

It is what it is. There are clues as to some things they're doing, and they talk about some experiments, but as with most classified programs there isn't a straight, clear answer.

Military...
Usually how it goes...



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: Arnie123

They are doing a lot for NASA as well. The OTV-4 mission performed a long endurance test of a Hall thruster for them, and the heat exchanger they're testing on this mission will have uses for them as well. Of course both will also be used by the military, but they have civilian applications as well.



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Ye, I figured as much. Makes perfect sense as well.



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: humanoidlord

Bull. It has the payload bay the size of a pickup truck bed. And Rods are laughable as a weapon system. It couldn't even carry one, let alone many of them.

Yah but could capture any number of smaller 'competing' (enemy) satellites. I doubt the original space shuttle came home empty, either.

The other mission, being the first warplane to drop a bomb from space, what a boast that would be over drinks.



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 03:47 PM
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No Em Drive? =(



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: Xeven

Not out the realm of possibility.



posted on Aug, 24 2017 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

then why hide what should be obviously boring material tests? if not an orbital bomber then its an spy imaging sattelite
edit on 24-8-2017 by humanoidlord because: (no reason given)



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