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Catastrophic rainfall predicted for TX, LA, gulf coast region.

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posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:05 AM
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a reply to: putnam6

Thanks for that! The last thing anyone needs in that area is to worry about 350 hungry alligators on the loose.




posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 01:57 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: putnam6

Thanks for that! The last thing anyone needs in that area is to worry about 350 hungry alligators on the loose.

I had an alligator in my front yard this morning.
They tend to mind their own business.
I'm sure there is feast for the gators these days.
Alligators have to eat, too.
RIP Fluffy.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 02:48 AM
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originally posted by: skunkape23

originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: putnam6

Thanks for that! The last thing anyone needs in that area is to worry about 350 hungry alligators on the loose.

I had an alligator in my front yard this morning.
They tend to mind their own business.
I'm sure there is feast for the gators these days.
Alligators have to eat, too.
RIP Fluffy.


Thats exactly almost what the guy in Beaumont said,leave them alone if you see one,they have been displaced and will most likely return to their natural habitat. Like he also said and somebody here said also 350 would be just a drop in the bucket. There are thousands of them and they just want to be left alone.

Yea it might be lights out for the unwary cat or dog thats never ran across a gator in the wrong circumstances.



posted on Sep, 3 2017 @ 08:31 PM
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People are starting to clean up and rebuild in the wake of our friend Harvey. I was off today so I just kind of spent the day lazing around the house, it was needed after a hectic week.

We were blessed and did not get any water in the house other than through one known roof leak, which I had already mitigated and a bit through a window during one period of time it was raining sideways.

I'm a property manager for a small self storage facility in the area which, luckily, only had a small amount of water in one building due to a drain being backed up. It couldn't quite keep up with the amount of water coming out of the sky in the period of time in which it was falling. Once we got a lull in the Rain, the drains were able to catch up but not until the building got about an inch of water throughout. My boss, the regional manager lives on site above the office. He was actually out walking around in the rain Saturday night or Sunday night checking on the property when it slowed down. I don't remember which, but it was around at 2 a.m. and I was texting back and forth with him on the status of everything there and here where I was.

We have notified all the tenants that are in that building and of the ones we've talked to you only a few have had significant amounts of damage to their property and it was minor in comparison to what could have been. There were even a few spaces in that building that didn't get any water at all.

We ran out of climate control spaces the first day we were open after the rains, which would have been Wednesday; by the way, if you ask the average Houstonian what day is right now most of them won't know. And have since come close to running out of non-climate control spaces.

The stories I have heard from people coming in range from utter heartbreak and complete ruin to immensely uplifting and incredibly inspiring.

One of our new tenants lost practically everything and yet still used his personal boat to rescue a family and had, at times to swim, and hold on to the edge of the boat because the water was too deep for him to be able to stand. We've had people coming in and renting a space for friends of theirs who had lost everything and not had the means to do so on their own. There has been a constant flow of vehicles with trailers and passenger cars even stuffed with personal effects coming into the property.

We've implemented some move in specials to help people out and have just about sold out of our packing supplies, at a discount mind you.

I took a drive around the lake today, that would be Clear Lake which is just down the road from Johnson Space Center. Many, many businesses were open, some were not. Most restaurants that were open were jam packed or at least much busier than normal.

I went shopping yesterday for the first time after the storm and managed to get everything on my list other than bread. It's the local grocery store I go to and was pretty well fully stocked except for bread, produce looked a little bit picked over, and a lot of the snack foods were also looking bare around the aisles.

Water was available, but signs up were asking people to limit themselves to two cases per family. Same thing with milk it was available but signs are up asking people to limit themselves to two gallons per family.

Fuel has been available at most gas stations I've passed, with the exception of diesel being somewhat harder to find. I suppose that's probably due to being much closer to the refineries in Texas City than perhaps Dallas has had, where I've heard of shortages occurring in.

In the neighborhoods, on either side of Nasa Road 1, I saw many piles of debris that would be expected from rising water; carpet, padding, sheetrock, furniture, clothing, bedding, etc. There were also a good number of houses which had no debris in front of them; now, I do not know if that is due to people whom had evacuated not having returned yet or if there is no damage in those houses similarly to my fortune. The loss is catastrophic no doubt, as evidenced by the miles and miles of debris that is lining the road in many subdivisions throughout the area, but it is not 100%.

There was a line around the building of the George R Brown Convention Center, which is where most of those rescued ended up. The line was not for food or water or clothing. The line was people waiting to volunteer, while it was still raining. Many of whom had water in their own homes but were out helping anyway.

Social media posts asking for certain things are usually answered multiple times and short succession. There are multiple posts being made of people that have certain items wanting to know if anybody they know specifically needs those. There is a lot of networking help going on on social media among those in the affected area.

The scale of This Disaster makes it impossible for any centralized agency to be able to oversee and help everybody that needs help in a timely fashion.

In our usual Texan style of ingenuity we are finding ways to help each other.

I just want to say thank you to everyone who's ask about me both through the threads and in PMs and over in TA's live feed. It really means a lot!

ATS, you rock.
edit on 3-9-2017 by jadedANDcynical because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-9-2017 by jadedANDcynical because: (no reason given)



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