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Altimeter flaw suspected in BAE 125 and 737 midair

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posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 06:01 PM
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On September 5, 2015, a BAE 125 belonging to Senegalair operating from Ouagadougou to Dakar on a medical evacuation flight was involved in a midair collision with a Ceiba 737. The 125 continued towards Dakar, before overflying the Dakar VOR and out over the Atlantic, where it rapidly descended and crashed into the water. The wreckage was never found, and no trace of the seven people on board was found.

The Ceiba 737 diverted to Malabo, where they landed safely. They had approximately one meter of the right winglet ripped off.

Investigatorsbelieve there was something wrong with the altimeter of the 125. The crew acknowledged an instruction to remain at 34,000 feet, but they then climbed to 35,000 feet, where the impact occurred. Without the wreckage or data recorders, investigators can't conclusively say what the ultimate cause was, and have to rely on radar data to determine the actions of the 125.

www.flightglobal.com...




posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

This may be a stupid question and forgive my ignorance, but isn't it possible for the information from the data recorders to be transmitted in real time to a specific system so that we have that information available, even if the wreckage cannot be found?



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: introvert

They're looking at multiple options for a new generation of recorders, from floating recorders, ejecting recorders, and recorders that burst transmit a certain amount of data in the event of certain parameters being met.
edit on 8/22/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 10:34 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: introvert

They're looking at multiple options for a new generation of recorders, from floating recorders, ejecting recorders, and recorders that burst transmit a certain amount of data in the event of certain parameters being met.


That would be neat- but then you couldn't have a goon with FBI markings walk off the cash site in national television carrying the black box... And then claim it was never found.

The people who run things aren't truly interested in making the truth easy to find- it would seem, just the opposite.



posted on Aug, 23 2017 @ 04:51 AM
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a reply to: [post=22593936]lordcomac[/post

Well said lordcomac The Lockerbie bombing evidence had more holes in it than the aircraft, poor innocent souls lost while politicians and goons decided the preferred outcome


edit on 8/23/2017 by astra001uk because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2017 @ 10:48 AM
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The collision avoidance system apparently failed to operate properly. The system from the 737 was examined, and it showed no traffic warnings prior to the collision. When the crew was interviewed, they said they were warned of traffic 1,000 feet below them, but initially saw the BAE 125 flying 1,000 feet above them, and descending through their altitude.

www.flightglobal.com...

Five hours before the collision, the BAE 125 triggered multiple alarms on ATC radar for being at the wrong altitude. On the 10th, and 23rd of July, as well as the 31st of August there were incidents that showed a problem with the altimeter on the aircraft. On the 23rd of July, the aircraft passed an Arik Air 737 at the same altitude. The Arik crew had been informed that the 125 was at 32,000 feet when in reality they were at 31,000. The crew insisted they were higher, and that there was more separation between the two aircraft, but the Arik 737 had descended to 29,000 by that point.

www.flightglobal.com...
edit on 8/23/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2017 @ 04:51 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Pretty scary! Looking at pictures of a BAE 125 on google, I can see why it probably took on a lot more damage than the 737. I would compare it to a pickup truck bumping into a Mack truck at speed. The mack is more likely to keep on rolling.



posted on Aug, 23 2017 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

From the radar data, it appears that the winglet depressurized the aircraft. They flew straight and level until they dove into the ocean, almost certainly from lack of fuel. That's exactly what we saw with the Payne Stewart accident and others, where the aircraft either failed to pressurize or depressurized.
edit on 8/23/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2017 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
I fly a lot commercially and never think about accidents happening. After a while, you get a sense that everything's OK just from the noises during a flight. I can tell the difference too between turbulence and a sudden move.

i can't imagine what it was like in the 125. Personally, if something were to happen on a flight, I'd prefer immediate obliteration instead of a slow decent into the ocean.



posted on Aug, 23 2017 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

If they were lucky, they were unconscious after they lost pressure.




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