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US Navy collisions stoke cyber threat concerns

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posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:07 AM
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a reply to: GBP/JPY
Nice tub the old CC's..Flybridge I assume?... not many out this way though.
You must have had DEEEEP pockets to pay for the gas (to run at fun speeds anyways)
My old one was a Randell (oz designed and manufactured) Current is custom alloy flybridge twin volvo kad300/castoldi Jet06's... only draws about 0.5m draft and just bounces off sandbars, rocks n coral...lol




posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


There's no telling what was around them

So no decent Nav systems either? or mk1 eyeballs?
And I believe the channel at that point is only about 2km wide...
still just sayin....



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: CovertAgenda

I'm talking about the Monday morning quarterbacks. There may have been a damn good reason they didn't try to turn that we don't know. We weren't there in the heat of the moment, so don't know what was going on.



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: [post=22589676]dianajune[/post

The full article also says...

"In a little noticed June 22 incident, someone manipulated GPS signals in the eastern part of the Black Sea, leaving some 20 ships with little situational awareness. Shipboard navigation equipment, which appeared to be working properly, reported the location of the vessels 20 miles inland, near an airport."

That to me makes sense. This 'GPS spoofing' can be done with off the shelf packages, according to the article. I guess no one ever figured on corrupting such fundamental information.

Bring back the sextant and the watch man....and hold off on n plans to travel by automatic cars, boats, or planes!



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:40 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: AdmireTheDistance

A Navy spokesperson said it shortly after the accident. They may have lost steering before the collision but were able to get it back at some point, and get themselves into port.


The warship suffered a steering failure as the warship was beginning its approach into the Strait of Malacca, near Singapore, causing it to collide with a commercial tanker Monday, a US Navy official told us.

The official also said it was unclear why the crew couldn't utilize the ship's backup steering systems to maintain control of ship.



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:42 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
For sure mate, but ain't that what we are here for... speculate until the 'official version' comes out... then we can ridicule it...
LOL



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 02:24 AM
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a reply to: dianajune

Perhaps somebody is letting somebody know their farmed out design, develop and manufacture offshoring might not have been a good idea. Might this reduce confidence in the millitree about the ability of their hardware to work as instended?

Perhaps the new power in the world today lies in who controlls electronic technology and whose is the best?


edit on 22-8-2017 by Azureblue because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

what I do know is that if steering failed from the pilot house, A-gang could have manned aft steering in a matter of minutes, establish Coms and steer the ship.

if amphibs can do it, so can DDGs, I should know, ccs sup / pac for 2 years
edit on 22-8-2017 by odzeandennz because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 06:06 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: dianajune


Great post, DianaJune. I hadn't thought of that. Kim Jong zapping our fleet's navigation systems. Maybe with the help of IRAN too.


Thank you. The report got me thinking of the question "what would cause the steering to fail" - but Zaphod made some excellent points. I don't know nearly as much as he or other members of ATS do about such things.

Makes you kind of wonder......NK is known for cyber attacks.....it would make sense for them to go after ships that would be potential threats.


edit on 22-8-2017 by dianajune because: typo



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 06:10 AM
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originally posted by: Doxanoxa
a reply to: [post=22589676]dianajune[/post

The full article also says...

"In a little noticed June 22 incident, someone manipulated GPS signals in the eastern part of the Black Sea, leaving some 20 ships with little situational awareness. Shipboard navigation equipment, which appeared to be working properly, reported the location of the vessels 20 miles inland, near an airport."

That to me makes sense. This 'GPS spoofing' can be done with off the shelf packages, according to the article. I guess no one ever figured on corrupting such fundamental information.

Bring back the sextant and the watch man....and hold off on n plans to travel by automatic cars, boats, or planes!



I saw that....never heard of GPS spoofing until I read the report. I didn't know this was even possible.



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 06:51 AM
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regards " GPS spoofing "

yes - it is possible - but to make 2 vessels collide - you need a different spoof to each vessel . [ or genuine signal to one - and a spoof to the other ]

so - please cite how you do that trick

otherwise - GPS spoofing is an irrelevant distraction

ETA clarity

further :

GPS " spoofing " does not affect radar or lookouts
edit on 22-8-2017 by ignorant_ape because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 06:56 AM
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the notion that 2 incidents in a short space of time = " a cyber security threat " betrays a frightening ignorance of statistical probabilities and co-incidence
edit on 22-8-2017 by ignorant_ape because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 07:05 AM
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a reply to: odzeandennz

Yes, they could have, unless it went out shortly before they hit.



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 10:45 AM
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The last collison had brought questions of whether commercial autopilots where vulnerable on these large container ships.
Tracking webites give very accrate locations, so if you can localize traffic and find the one with a vulnerable system in the dark of night when people on watch arent really that aware, you could plausibly turn a normal passing transition into a crossing route. Remember these things have such a mass that you cant just stop thir forward motion so even when it becomes imminent and people are aware, they likely still will collide.

There was an instance off Korea just days before the USS Fitzgerald was crashed into that was certainly thought to be a hack of a ship using the control systems in question.

Id say there is an exploit out there, and if you can identify a target its a likely situation.

Remember Supposedly Russian air services was able to use their Electronic warfare suite to supposedly shut down the Aegis systems and the entire ship USS Donald Cook in the black sea effectively leaving it sitting in the open dead in the water.



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: ChrisM101

exploit or not, especially in the region they were, they have 'forward and aft lookouts' watchstander at all times. a radar system directly in CCS on a monitor to display any vessel within 40 - 50 NM.
in case of exploitation, the steering is hydraulic... even if the electronic controls were compromised, they can manually steer the ship.

these incidents reeks of 'JWS culture ' coming from the 7th fleet. I hope the brass don't just get a slap on the wrist for the death of so many sailors...
edit on 22-8-2017 by odzeandennz because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 11:05 AM
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Not exactly wide open seas

abcnews.go.com...



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: ChrisM101

That incident with the Cook was pure propaganda. The system in question, the Khibiny, is the equivalent of the ALQ-131 self protection system on the F-16 (significantly improved, but same idea). It was designed to mount on the wingtip missile rails in the Su-34 initially, and is being modified to fit on the Su-35, Su-30MK2, and others that have the same rails.

The aircraft that buzzed tee Cook and supposedly turned it off was an Su-24, which is a variable wing design that doesn't have any way to mount the Khibiny on it.



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:27 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: ChrisM101

That incident with the Cook was pure propaganda. The system in question, the Khibiny, is the equivalent of the ALQ-131 self protection system on the F-16 (significantly improved, but same idea). It was designed to mount on the wingtip missile rails in the Su-34 initially, and is being modified to fit on the Su-35, Su-30MK2, and others that have the same rails.

The aircraft that buzzed tee Cook and supposedly turned it off was an Su-24, which is a variable wing design that doesn't have any way to mount the Khibiny on it.


Not necessarily Khibiny-

Murmansk BN which is situated in Crimea and has a range of over 1800 miles fully capable of an output reaching the Cook.



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: ChrisM101

And the farther away you are, the harder it is to affect a radar system. Either electronically or by jamming. The Aegis isn't something that's going to be wide open where you can just "turn it off" like they claimed.



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: ChrisM101

And the farther away you are, the harder it is to affect a radar system. Either electronically or by jamming. The Aegis isn't something that's going to be wide open where you can just "turn it off" like they claimed.


You must not be familiar with our own capabilities, nor that of Israel.

Even without the turn off hack, you can EMP, or just flat overpower somethings.

BTW we had two MQ-1Bs crash flying from Incirlik Turkey in two days? why???



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