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Salt water crops- Halophtes

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posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 01:16 PM
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I had never heard of these before but they sound miraculous. Halophytes are salt loving plants, which actually make potable water to live on. These plants are now being GMO'd to produce biomass fuels so that it will relieve the pressure on regular agriculture lands, and help to produce cheap biomass fuels down the line. It may even help clean up the environment in some cases. Imagine places like the Great Salt Lake in Utah, or the Dead Sea, becoming giant biomasss farms.

Estimates are that there are 480,000 square of viable, unused, land that would not impact local ecosystems. Estimates are that the land could produce 35% of the US annual oil consumption every year. Sounds like a win-win to me.

www.wired.com...
plantsinaction.science.uq.edu.au.../17-3-halophytes-and-adaptation-salt
geneticliteracyproject.org...

This article is kinda old in terms of technology, but it is a new rice that is highly salt tolerant and may be used in India where coastal floods have taken land.
timesofindia.indiatimes.com...




posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24

Excellent, another agricultural/energy product to subsidize. I'm sure the people in congress have already spent the lobbying money that's going to roll in.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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originally posted by: lakenheath24
I had never heard of these before but they sound miraculous. Halophytes are salt loving plants, which actually make potable water to live on. These plants are now being GMO'd to produce biomass fuels so that it will relieve the pressure on regular agriculture lands, and help to produce cheap biomass fuels down the line. It may even help clean up the environment in some cases. Imagine places like the Great Salt Lake in Utah, or the Dead Sea, becoming giant biomasss farms.

Estimates are that there are 480,000 square of viable, unused, land that would not impact local ecosystems. Estimates are that the land could produce 35% of the US annual oil consumption every year. Sounds like a win-win to me.

www.wired.com...
plantsinaction.science.uq.edu.au.../17-3-halophytes-and-adaptation-salt
geneticliteracyproject.org...

This article is kinda old in terms of technology, but it is a new rice that is highly salt tolerant and may be used in India where coastal floods have taken land.
timesofindia.indiatimes.com...



Ummm...why not use them as little desalinization plants...for some brussel sprout flavored h20...could be the new fave drink...who needs cucumber water when you can have arugula bitters to brighten up your day...

...Turnip twist anyone...anyone...?



YouSir



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: YouSir

H20?????? I was thinking BEER!



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