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Ancient Indian astronomers correctly calculated the Speed of Light long before the Olaus Roemer?

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posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 06:36 AM
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This research paper from 1998 postulates that the Speed of Light was calculated at least 700-500 years before Olaus Roemer. Roemer, the Danish astronomer, correctly calculated the speed of light in 1676 AD.

The Rigveda is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns that are at least 3,200 years old. A commentary dated 10th-12th AD says that the speed of light is 185,793 miles per second, while the standard scientific value for speed of light is 186,322 miles per second - that is so close it just can't be a coincident.

The speed of light is mentioned in a commentary by Bhatta Bhaskara to the Taittiriya Brahmana of the Yajurveda on the fourth verse of the hymn 1.50 of the Rigveda on the Sun:



Sanskrit:
-"Tatha ca smaryate yojananam sahasre dve dve sate dve ca yojane ekena nimisardhena kramamana"

Translated:
-"Thus it is remembered: [O Sun] you who traverse 2,202 Yojanas in half a Nimesa."


The measurements of Yojanas and Nimesa are documented in the Vedas, I'm not going to go into the math here, but if your interested then there is an extensive explanation here: The speed of light - Taittirya Brahmana of the Yajurveda in addition to the actual paper.



-MM
edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 06:59 AM
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I wonder how they could have worked that one out? Did they measure the distance to the Sun by looking at the differences between shadow angles in temples?

The speed of light can be measured using nothing more than a light source, a rotating gear or mirror, and a lens. The light goes through a gap between gear teeth, reflected off a mirror, and back onto a screen or eyepiece. Get the speed of the gear right, and light will either be blocked by a gear tooth or pass through a gap.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: stormcell

Through observation? The ancient indian's must have had better lenses and higher maths than they are given credit for if they used the same method as Roemer. Olaus Roemer's method was based on observations of the eclipses of the moons of Jupiter (by Jupiter).



Roemer noted that the observed time interval between successive eclipses of a given moon was about seven minutes greater when the observations were carried out when the earth in its orbit was moving away from Jupiter than when it was moving toward Jupiter. He reasoned that, when the earth was moving away from Jupiter, the observed time between eclipses was increased above the true value (by about 3.5 minutes) due to the extra distance that the light from each successive eclipse had to travel to reach the earth. Conversely, when the earth was moving toward Jupiter, the observed interval between eclipses was decreased (by about 3.5 minutes) because of the decreased distance that the light had to travel on each successive eclipse.
Source

-MM
edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 07:09 AM
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originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation
This research paper from 1998 postulates that the Speed of Light was written down in the Rigveda's most likely between c. 1,500 and 1,200 BC, that's 3,000 years before the Danish astronomer, Olaus Roemer, whom western scholars give credit for being the first to correctly calculate the speed of light.

The Rigveda is an ancient Indian collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns that are at least 3,200 years old. The texts says the speed of light is 185,793 miles per second, while the standard scientific value for speed of light is 186,322 miles per second - that is so close it just can't be a pure coincident.


The speed is mentioned in a commentary, not in the Rigveda itself.

The rest of the paper looks speculative and biased imho.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: moebius

The commentary was written by Bhatta Bhaskara who according to scholars lived somewhere between the 10th and 12th century AD - that's still 700-500 years before Roemer lived.

There is also a commentary by Sayana (1315-1387 AD) on the speed of light, the oldest existing copy of Sayana’s commentary is dated 1395 AD, and is preserved in the Central Library at Vadodara. Roemer calculated the speed of light in 1676.

I have changed the OP title and text to be less misleading, thanks.

-MM
edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 08:41 AM
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originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation
a reply to: moebius

The commentary was written by Bhatta Bhaskara who according to scholars lived somewhere between the 10th and 12th century AD - that's still 700-500 years before Roemer lived.

There is also a commentary by Sayana (1315-1387 AD) on the speed of light, the oldest existing copy of Sayana’s commentary is dated 1395 AD, and is preserved in the Central Library at Vadodara. Roemer calculated the speed of light in 1676.

I have changed the OP title and text to be less misleading, thanks.

-MM

Interesting idea. However, if you look into the units (yojana and nimesa) you'll find that estimates of the first vary by 25% (from the minimum) and the second one actually means in the blink of an eye, which is sort of arbitrary, to say the least.

Harte



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 08:42 AM
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What if they didn't calculate it and were actually told it?



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Harte

True, the most accepted measurements of 1 Yojana are 5 miles, 8 miles or 9 miles - you basically have three choices. And there are variations beyond that.

-MM
edit on 20-8-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: MerkabaMeditation

Interesting thread, and no matter which of the values we assume for 1 Yojana, that text passage definitely described something that was darn fast. The other unit mentioned (nimesa) seems to be quite close to our second: 1 nimesa = 0,43s (source).

Another question would be: why is the Hindu base unit for time (Truti) measured in µs (microseconds), 1 Truti ≈ 0.031 µs? That's a rather short time interval, equivalent to 0.000000031 seconds. Ridiculously short, actually. I guess that's rather a unit one would apply when measuring particle collisions...

edit on 20-8-2017 by jeep3r because: text



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: jeep3r
a reply to: MerkabaMeditation

Interesting thread, and no matter which of the values we assume for 1 Yojana, that text passage definitely described something that was darn fast. The other unit mentioned (nimesa) seems to be quite close to our second: 1 nimesa = 0,43s (source).

Another question would be: why is the Hindu base unit for time (Truti) measured in µs (microseconds), 1 Truti ≈ 0.031 µs? That's a rather short time interval, equivalent to 0.000000031 seconds. Ridiculously short, actually. I guess that's rather a unit one would apply when measuring particle collisions...

Well, one of the yogic siddhis, or paranormal powers, is anima, a Sanskrit word meaning "mindfullness". According to Patanjali's "Yoga Sutras" (Aphorism 3.26), this is the ability to gain "knowledge of the small, the hidden and the distant by directing the light of a superphysical faculty". In modern terms, it is remote-viewing of the atomic and subatomic world. It was demonstrated by Annie Besant and C.W. Leadbeater at the end of the 19th century, and their observations have been scientifically investigated. See here. Given the availability for thousands of years through yoga of the ability to see clairvoyantly microscopic objects such as atoms, it comes as no surprise to me that the Hindu base unit for time is microscopic in magnitude.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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So the Indians discovered that light can travel between 5 and 9 miles in the blink of an eye

Where do they say it travels at 186,000 miles a second?



posted on Aug, 21 2017 @ 02:18 AM
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a reply to: GusMcDangerthing
Then whoever told them was less accurate than a 1600s Dane..?



posted on Aug, 21 2017 @ 03:31 AM
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I'm sure they were aware of this long ago,but it doesn't fit into the story the government wants us to believe,only they can control history



posted on Aug, 21 2017 @ 03:52 AM
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originally posted by: Oldtimer2
I'm sure they were aware of this long ago,but it doesn't fit into the story the government wants us to believe,only they can control history

Which government are you talking about?



posted on Aug, 21 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: jeep3r
a reply to: MerkabaMeditation

Interesting thread, and no matter which of the values we assume for 1 Yojana, that text passage definitely described something that was darn fast. The other unit mentioned (nimesa) seems to be quite close to our second: 1 nimesa = 0,43s (source).

Well, it's off by 50%, isn't it.

Earlier I said it means "blink of an eye." That's not exactly correct - it is more like "twinkling of an eye."
Again, quite arbitrary.

This allows the fanatically faithful to make great claims about what's in the Vedas. It also allows shysters to sell books and book some conference presentations.



originally posted by: jeep3r
Another question would be: why is the Hindu base unit for time (Truti) measured in µs (microseconds), 1 Truti ≈ 0.031 µs? That's a rather short time interval, equivalent to 0.000000031 seconds. Ridiculously short, actually. I guess that's rather a unit one would apply when measuring particle collisions...

I believe this comes from subdividing all the way down from a kalpa (one day of Brahma - 4.3 billion years.)

Harte



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 12:57 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

Well, it's off by 50%, isn't it.

Earlier I said it means "blink of an eye." That's not exactly correct - it is more like "twinkling of an eye."
Again, quite arbitrary.

This allows the fanatically faithful to make great claims about what's in the Vedas. It also allows shysters to sell books and book some conference presentations.


Definitely way off, but still quite fast. And since you mentioned it, let's not forget the many YouTuber's who are going to use the speed of light analogy in one way or another for their clips without doing any further research.

It's all about context and how the translations came about. And that's where ancient indian scripture is probably even more problematic than, for example, biblical text passages. I guess it would be a rather time consuming task to find out where these units once originated and what they really meant (or what they were associated with).
edit on 22-8-2017 by jeep3r because: text



posted on Aug, 22 2017 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: jeep3r

I'd allow that people have noticed light is very fast, if they first think of light as a thing that travels, rather than being instantaneous, which many people in ancient times asserted.

As far as the YouTubers, they are ALL ignorant morons (or serving ignorant tripe to morons.)
But, I don't watch them and, since I consider people willing to watch them to be irredeemable, they don't bother me.

Harte




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