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How to survive a Nuclear explosion.

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posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 04:02 PM
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Friends? This needs to be shared. I dont expect to survive as a 1st Responder. I'll be out getting everyone to shelter or away. That's o.k. I choose it. But, that is for another thread in itself. Not sure if anyone thought of this basic, immediate action and re-action to a nearby blast.

The 1st 5 minutes after...if you live? Then what? Where? How? Share this link and basic info with family, friends and neighbors. And I suggest further searching for yourselves. There is much, much more info out there to help you and yours. I've highlighted some basic, important points -Mysterioustranger

curiosity.com...

"How To Survive A Nuclear Explosion..." Add: (The 1st 5 minutes to---)

"During the Cold War, the U.S. government recommended that schoolchildren "duck and cover" in case of a nuclear attack. Those days and that anxious cartoon turtle are now behind us, but the threat of nuclear war still lingers. In 2014, an atmospheric scientist published a paper suggesting that victims of a nuclear attack do something unexpected: instead of hunkering down at home, they should leave to find better shelter. His recommendations have their critics, however.

Hole Up Or Head Out

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory atmospheric scientist Michael Dillon, Ph.D. published an analysis in Proceedings Of The Royal Society A where he crunched the numbers to determine a person's best course of action in case of a low-yield nuclear attack — the kind like that of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which experts think would be on par with the size of bomb a terrorist could detonate.

If a bomb like that exploded, it would first produce a giant radioactive fireball, followed by a flash of light that can blind and burn skin, and finally a blast of superheated air that can crush buildings and send clouds of debris flying. Dillon's analysis, however, deals with the aftermath: the deadly radioactive fallout. What's the best way to avoid it?

Guidelines generally recommend to take shelter in the closest, most protective structure you can: a basement, a parking garage, or a tunnel, which FEMA says can reduce radiation doses by a factor of at least 10. But what if your house doesn't have a basement? Dillon has an answer: if your house isn't very protective and you know you can get to a quality shelter in five minutes, run to that shelter. If the nearest shelter is 15 minutes away, stay put for a half-hour, maximum, then run to that shelter.

That's because your radiation dose is a balance of how much you get in an improper shelter and how much you'll get when you're outside reaching a better shelter. According to Dillon's calculations, a five-minute run is worth reaching a nearby shelter. But if it's further away, waiting pays off, since environmental radiation intensity decreases over time. The researcher estimates that these guidelines could save between 10,000 and 100,000 lives.

Political Fallout

Not everyone agrees with this advice. Critics say that telling everyone to leave can force too many people out on the streets, where they'll be slowed by gridlock and exposed to radiation for longer than they planned. That's one reason the U.S. government recommends that people shelter for at least 12 hours after the blast. Even barring a mob of people running for safety, an individual can't predict how long it'll take to get to a shelter after a blast based on how long it would take on a normal day. There will most definitely be debris in the way, slowing you down.

Still, it's important to crunch the numbers because that helps government agencies create better recommendations and evacuation plans. Knowing that there's a tradeoff between how much radiation you get in a poor shelter and how much you'd get by running to a better one is useful in policy decisions, and could indeed save lives. But if the they do drop the big one, try your best to hole up in a basement(or at least a fridge, Indiana Jones style), and feel free to duck and cover."

c/o Curiosity.com

We are in troubling times right now. Be prepared friends. Volunteer...there are many places and org's out there. Help others to prepare at least. Best and Love to all....M.S.


edit on 18-8-2017 by mysterioustranger because: *edit




posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 04:09 PM
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Remember to use the rule of thumb, if the mushroom cloud is bigger than your thumb held as far away as you can, then you are in the fallout radius.



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

Hi yield devices fry exposed persons within a few milliseconds with high doses of gamma and neutron radiation. There is no duck and cover possible if you are outside, line of sight from the air burst.

If you happen to be inside at the time, then the heat will set fire to structures, expanding and turning to a firestorm, ten, a hundred times more widespread than Hiroshima. If you survive the initial heat, the blast will turn everything to rubble-- Crushing it first then bat it like a baseball.

And if you are downwind don't breathe, the fallout plume is coming on, its coming on, its comin' onnn....

edit on 18-8-2017 by intrptr because: change



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 04:36 PM
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originally posted by: mysterioustranger
Friends? This needs to be shared. I dont expect to survive as a 1st Responder. I'll be out getting everyone to shelter or away. That's o.k. I choose it. But, that is for another thread in itself. Not sure if anyone thought of this basic, immediate action and re-action to a nearby blast.

The 1st 5 minutes after...if you live? Then what? Where? How? Share this link and basic info with family, friends and neighbors. And I suggest further searching for yourselves. There is much, much more info out there to help you and yours. I've highlighted some basic, important points -Mysterioustranger

curiosity.com...

"How To Survive A Nuclear Explosion..." Add: (The 1st 5 minutes to---)

"During the Cold War, the U.S. government recommended that schoolchildren "duck and cover" in case of a nuclear attack. Those days and that anxious cartoon turtle are now behind us, but the threat of nuclear war still lingers. In 2014, an atmospheric scientist published a paper suggesting that victims of a nuclear attack do something unexpected: instead of hunkering down at home, they should leave to find better shelter. His recommendations have their critics, however.

Hole Up Or Head Out

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory atmospheric scientist Michael Dillon, Ph.D. published an analysis in Proceedings Of The Royal Society A where he crunched the numbers to determine a person's best course of action in case of a low-yield nuclear attack — the kind like that of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which experts think would be on par with the size of bomb a terrorist could detonate.

If a bomb like that exploded, it would first produce a giant radioactive fireball, followed by a flash of light that can blind and burn skin, and finally a blast of superheated air that can crush buildings and send clouds of debris flying. Dillon's analysis, however, deals with the aftermath: the deadly radioactive fallout. What's the best way to avoid it?

Guidelines generally recommend to take shelter in the closest, most protective structure you can: a basement, a parking garage, or a tunnel, which FEMA says can reduce radiation doses by a factor of at least 10. But what if your house doesn't have a basement? Dillon has an answer: if your house isn't very protective and you know you can get to a quality shelter in five minutes, run to that shelter. If the nearest shelter is 15 minutes away, stay put for a half-hour, maximum, then run to that shelter.

That's because your radiation dose is a balance of how much you get in an improper shelter and how much you'll get when you're outside reaching a better shelter. According to Dillon's calculations, a five-minute run is worth reaching a nearby shelter. But if it's further away, waiting pays off, since environmental radiation intensity decreases over time. The researcher estimates that these guidelines could save between 10,000 and 100,000 lives.

Political Fallout

Not everyone agrees with this advice. Critics say that telling everyone to leave can force too many people out on the streets, where they'll be slowed by gridlock and exposed to radiation for longer than they planned. That's one reason the U.S. government recommends that people shelter for at least 12 hours after the blast. Even barring a mob of people running for safety, an individual can't predict how long it'll take to get to a shelter after a blast based on how long it would take on a normal day. There will most definitely be debris in the way, slowing you down.

Still, it's important to crunch the numbers because that helps government agencies create better recommendations and evacuation plans. Knowing that there's a tradeoff between how much radiation you get in a poor shelter and how much you'd get by running to a better one is useful in policy decisions, and could indeed save lives. But if the they do drop the big one, try your best to hole up in a basement(or at least a fridge, Indiana Jones style), and feel free to duck and cover."

c/o Curiosity.com

We are in troubling times right now. Be prepared friends. Volunteer...there are many places and org's out there. Help others to prepare at least. Best and Love to all....M.S.



Also, be elsewhere!



(seriously though, we sort of know which places are likely targets, so if a possible nuclear attack is expected - don't be there-)



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 04:37 PM
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Why?

Why would anyone else want to survive a nuclear explosion? That in itself is a mental illness. There would be nothing left worth rejoicing over.



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 04:41 PM
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Guidelines generally recommend to take shelter in the closest, most protective structure you can: a basement, a parking garage, or a tunnel, which FEMA says can reduce radiation doses by a factor of at least 10. But what if your house doesn't have a basement? Dillon has an answer: if your house isn't very protective and you know you can get to a quality shelter in five minutes, run to that shelter. If the nearest shelter is 15 minutes away, stay put for a half-hour, maximum, then run to that shelter.


They are giving bad advice.

Because most of the fallout shelters this country use to have has fallen beyond repair.

Unless you know someone a prepper. That's built a bunker.

Your goose is pretty much cooked.

Fallout is the killer after the initial blast.

Air/water contamination.



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 04:59 PM
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most would survive the initial nuclear blast it's the radioactive fallout that's the real problem.
it would serve you best to try and gets as near to ground zero to make a quick exit rather than struggle on dying of radiation exposure.



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 06:35 PM
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Ha, I'm old enough to remember these.

Though truth be told this is the only real way to respond in the event of a nuclear burst near you.

"If you have available overhead cover ie: desks, archways make use of these for shelter.
Then squat as close to the ground as you can, wrapping your arms around your lower legs, tuck your head between your knees as far as it can go & kiss your ass goodbye."

K~



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 07:13 PM
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Instructions: Bend over at the hip in the forward position. Put your head between your legs. Grab the outer side of your legs with your arms, Now with all the might you have.....thrust your head up you arse. That is how you survive thermonuclear war. YOU DON"T.



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: ADSE255
Why?

Why would anyone else want to survive a nuclear explosion? That in itself is a mental illness. There would be nothing left worth rejoicing over.


Being alive would be worth rejoicing. As long as you had your iodine pills.

peace



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: silo13

After a month of eating toxic waste, your skin would start falling off then the vomiting would begin. What's not to rejoice in that? Most people don't have enough iodine to last that long.

People at that point would turn into animals stealing from each other and trying to rule each other. Thanks but no thanks that's not life that's death.



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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Bend down, put your head between your legs and kiss your azz good bye cuz it a'int worth sticking around for.



posted on Aug, 18 2017 @ 11:28 PM
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Well, whether I decide to continue on or not, if I survive the initial blast (most likely I will, I'm at least 2 hours away from the nearest large city) will depend on whether it's a smaller bomb or one of those high yield monsters like China has. I suppose the mushroom cloud will tell the tale.

I do have a book (originally from the late 70s) on how to survive a nuclear attack. It has some fairly good advice, regarding what time of year it happens, which way the wind tends to blow, and which side of the mountains you should be on if you have any to hide on the other side of. It shows how to accomplish water filtration, slowing down what comes inside your house, blah blah blah. It even has plans to dig an underground shelter that won't collapse.

I rescue animals.....if they start to get sick and die, I will wait until the last one goes, and if I'm sick, I'm checking out. My kids are 1000 and 2000 miles away, respectively, and right in the bull's eye regarding being nuclear targets. I won't know how to get to them. They're adults, but if I couldn't find them, and my pets were all dead......millions of people vaporized.....I just couldn't survive the heartbreak.

Meh, none of us get out of this life alive. Fate will deal the cards, and I will play them as they are dealt.

Close counts in horseshoes, hand grenades, and nuclear bombs.

I still think it'll be an EMP first. This is the second nuclear showdown I've lived through (first one in 1962). Apparently, we haven't learned diddly squat.



posted on Aug, 19 2017 @ 12:55 AM
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I use to teach nuclear survival and treatment of the wounded and shelter survival in the military. I have a weakness in writing so bare with me.
Trust me there is a whole lot to know, but living is possible. It is the one disaster you have to follow all the rules perfectly. Bravoto, good intentions, pushing the limits will not work, you have to follow the rules and everyone with you have to follow the rules. Every mistake leads to exposure and ever exposure adds up and when you reach that limit the effects will occur and the almost mathematical outcome of radiation will follow it's course. Atomic blast, over-pressure, heat, flash will cause physical injury on a very large scale but they will be in the most part conventional injuries. Some say well I want to die in the first few moments of the attack....well you don't know that you will and if you live you must try and live. Radiation adds a horrible complication to the mix. The conventional injuries heal slower and as the radiation presents itself, the illness which follows seems to go away and then comes back days, weeks, months later.
I have tried to offer in-services to my local hospital and EMTs but they have the "We know it all" attitude that will not listen thus I will not try. They do not know this and regular search rescue and recovery procedures will make them all victims in the first few days. The hospital has a child's swimming pool out back to decon the contaminated. I asked well what about the litter patients...."I don't know" Who's going to scrub them...same answer and where are you going to get the water if the EMP takes out the city water plant....."I don't know" the same answer........I was advised the state national guard will be deployed for large scale decontamination......Sorry that's governmental wishful thinking, it will take to long and those contaminated will have no chance in that delay. What is the answer, local education for the measurement of Radioactive fallout, decontamination and working in bunker methodologies. . Local education for caregivers in recognizing the signs of exposure and the medical implications and treatment. Local education in exposure times and limits, assessing exposure by the onset of symptoms/ developing a prognosis from this information.. Local education of creating worker exposure limits and record keeping of the same.
But they don't want to know this stuff, but when the Bombs fall . . .it's to late to learn the easy way.
With that, I guess I'll hunker down and care for my family and see if we can make it through. One day this will happen, don't know when, but if the bombs are ready to go, one day they will be used.


a reply to: mysterioustranger


edit on bSaturday5881908am82017-08-19T00:58:41-05:002017-08-19T00:58:41-05:00 by Blindmancc because: Some misspelled words......



posted on Aug, 19 2017 @ 02:17 AM
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A book that eerily portrays the future by John Brunner published in 1972

www.amazon.com...

An enduring classic, this book offers a dramatic and prophetic look at the potential consequences of the escalating destruction of Earth. In this nightmare society, air pollution is so bad that gas masks are commonplace. Infant mortality is up, and everyone seems to suffer from some form of ailment.

The water is polluted, and only the poor drink from the tap. The government is ineffectual, and corporate interests scramble to make a profit from water purifiers, gas masks, and organic foods. Environmentalist Austin Train is on the run. The Trainites, environmental activists and sometime terrorists, want him to lead their movement. The government wants him in jail, or preferably, executed. The media wants a circus. Everyone has a plan for Train, but Train has a plan of his own. This suspenseful science fiction drama is now available to a new generation of enthusiasts.

edit on 19-8-2017 by ADSE255 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2017 @ 03:53 PM
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A grim subject, but this story made me laugh (in an incredulous sort of manner). I mean, out of all the pointless advice you could give people, this has to come somewhere near the top of the list.



posted on Aug, 19 2017 @ 04:31 PM
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Resonation. If you have blast wave resonator reactors built around a structure. Counter resonations could in theory dampen the effect.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 03:02 PM
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originally posted by: audubon
A grim subject, but this story made me laugh (in an incredulous sort of manner). I mean, out of all the pointless advice you could give people, this has to come somewhere near the top of the list.



Washing your hair probably won't be a priority


Your right, this is funny to the extreme. Where do these writers come from??
edit on 20-8-2017 by ADSE255 because: (no reason given)




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