It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Oregon Sets Major Precedent - Will No Longer Treat Drug Possession as a Felony

page: 1
24
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:04 PM
link   
Disclaimer: Please respect the T&Cs



A new bill, signed into law this week by Oregon Gov. Kate Brown makes personal and possession of coc aine, heroin, methamphetamine and other hard drugs a misdemeanor instead of a felony.

Source (daily newspaper for Douglas County, Oregon)

It doesn’t surprise me that one of the first to speak out against this bill is District Attorney, Rick Wesenberg. He states: “The bottom line is that it gives drug users and abusers more freedom to break the law with less consequences.” The point has been lost on him it seems.

An expensive ticket or fine can do enough damage to warrant a change in someone’s behavior, but putting them in jail for deciding to “harm” or "medicate" themselves can have disastrous consequences for both the individual and society as a whole.

Wesenberg continues...


“Douglas County is in opioid crisis, and in a meth crisis, and in a heroin crisis,” Wesenberg said. “The governor and the Legislature just blunted law enforcement’s most effective tool in combating drug addiction.”

So, in other words, your current “tool” and methodology has led you to the point of declaring an opioid crisis. Talk about not seeing past the end of one’s nose.


Wesenberg was joined in his fear mongering by Linn County District Attorney Doug Marteeny, who said, “To change the classification of this behavior from a felony to a misdemeanor is tantamount to telling our school children that tomorrow it will be less dangerous to use methamphetamine than it is today.”

Both Wesenberg and Marteeny, however, are very misguided. Research shows — as in the case of Portugal — decriminalizing drugs and treating addicts instead of caging them, can produce paradigm-shattering results.

According to law enforcement officials, the cost of incarceration, especially for repeat drug offenders, is far higher than simply treating their addiction. Cost aside, offering someone treatment before locking them up is simply the right thing to do, even to repeat offenders that have "harmed" no one but themselves. The gray area is when an individual could’ve potentially harmed someone and luckily didn’t.


As Oregon’s News-Review notes, among the bill’s supporters, are the Oregon Association Chiefs of Police and the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association, which said felony convictions include unintended consequences, including barriers to housing and employment. But the two groups, in a letter to a state senator who backed the bill, said the new law “will only produce positive results if additional drug treatment resources accompany this change in policy.”

The concept of helping addicts instead of putting them in jail has been adopted by 200 police agencies in 28 states. A recent study shows that states that have legalized recreational cannabis have seen far fewer opioid overdoses than those that still put people in prison for the same.

Anyway, it’s time for a change.


edit on 17-8-2017 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:08 PM
link   
O nooo watch the sky fall like it did i portugal......o wait the only thing that fell in Portugal was drug use.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:14 PM
link   
a reply to: eisegesis

I'm surprised they are not targeting petty drug offenses or giving maximum sentences or starting a war on the opioid "crisis".

I'm glad now a drug problem is being treated with humility and compassion and seen as a disease not a crime.
I wonder what's different this time around...



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:14 PM
link   
a reply to: eisegesis

What will the corporate prisons do for workers?????



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phonixfromtheashes
O nooo watch the sky fall like it did i portugal......o wait the only thing that fell in Portugal was drug use.


It really must suck for some people that the facts have such a liberal bias. God forbid we have government policy based on science as opposed to superstitions or personal preferences.


edit on 17-8-2017 by dfnj2015 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Phonixfromtheashes

You misspelled Phoenix.

On topic.

It could work but I can see diseases and nasty infections going up in that state.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: thesaneone
a reply to: Phonixfromtheashes

You misspelled Phoenix.

On topic.

It could work but I can see diseases and nasty infections going up in that state.


Not likely.

Those that want to do drugs will do it anyway regardless of law and if it is serious crime they will more likely use dirty needles.

I cou trys that have adopted decriminalisation, drug use and the diseases linked to it have dropped.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:22 PM
link   
Free bus tickets to oregon for all freshly released repeat drug dealers and problem junkies!



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:27 PM
link   
I say stop giving them Narcan and let nature take it's course

But I see no reason to waste taxpayers dollars arresting the dirtbags.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Phonixfromtheashes

I don't know, the rise of syphilis in that state is out of control because of its freak nature so I can see it happening even more with these types of loose laws.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:38 PM
link   
Finally some movement towards what works well in other countries. It will be abolished if Session's and Trump get their way. Prohibition increases disease and drug morbidity stastics, provides poor mental health outcomes, and diminishes the opurtunity to educate or rehabilitate. People will get high either way, the hydra will grow heads back everytime the govt beheads one. Legalise all natural substances and let people live how they wish.
edit on 17-8-2017 by aliensanonymous because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:49 PM
link   
a reply to: dfnj2015

funny thing. I like the idea of a wall on our border. I also like this.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:51 PM
link   
A step in the right direction!




posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 03:30 PM
link   
What?! Have we suddenly decided to go back to the realm of reason?
After all this time...



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 03:33 PM
link   
If this also applies to dealers, this is probably the wrong way to go about it. Ideally, you want to lessen punishment for addicts and people with personal-use amounts, offering them treatment instead of ruining their life by sending them to prison. On the other hand, why not toughen the laws against the people dealing the drugs? If it was mandatory life in prison for selling drugs to other people, you'd significantly reduce the number of people selling them in the first place.
Would anybody really even care if some meth pusher disappeared for the rest of his life?



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 03:33 PM
link   
a reply to: eisegesis

What we have been doing has been a massive failure. Logical and rational choice is to double down on what hasn't worked.

Thank God at least Oregan as a whole aren't retarded. Honestly the DA isn't either, but job security is job security.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 03:36 PM
link   
Cue the Jeff Sessions threat

It may be the way to go here. The war on drugs has not worked and the prisons are filled with these types of offenders. However, it only works if some sort of rehab program is in place.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 04:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: FredT

Cue the Jeff Sessions threat

It may be the way to go here. The war on drugs has not worked and the prisons are filled with these types of offenders. However, it only works if some sort of rehab program is in place.


Turn the for profit prisons into rehab clinics and send people found in possession there. If they get clean they get out.
edit on 17-8-2017 by DanDanDat because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 04:51 PM
link   
Good. The prison industrial complex has been a blight on our country for far too long. There are plenty of other laws to deal with people that do harm to anyone else. I do hope they get serious drug users some help though. Addiction is a nasty thing.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 04:52 PM
link   
a reply to: eisegesis

Libertarians worldwide and those who value liberty are rejoicing.

Dont expect DAs and others in LE to be happy about this.

The War on Drugs generates billions for LE and the "justice" system while at the same time eroding our civil liberties.




top topics



 
24
<<   2 >>

log in

join