It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Can You Hate Someone For No Logical Reason and Still Be a Good Person?.

page: 1
4
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 03:33 AM
link   
The liberal media is all bent out of shape over one statement from President Trump's lengthy Q&A session about the Charlottesville skirmish last week..

You have some very bad people in that group, but you also had people that were very fine people on both sides.
Read the Full Transcript here: www.cnbc.com...

I don't "hate" anyone for no rationally accepted reason, but I believe that you can still be a good father, husband, employee, and contributing member of society, even though you hate a person, group, or race, for no rational/logical reason.

Question: What do you think ATS? Can you hate a particular person, group, or race of people, for no good reason, and still be a GOOD PERSON?

The liberal media doesn't think so. I believe that if President Obama had said what President Trump said yesterday, there wouldn't be grown adults tearing up and crying, like we've seen over the past 24 hours. (One Example: dailycaller.com... )

-CareWeMust

edit on 8/17/2017 by carewemust because: wording adjustment




posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 03:49 AM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

Love Trumps Hate. Right? ?



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 03:51 AM
link   

originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: carewemust

Love Trumps Hate. Right? ?



Right! Love one another, as Trump has repeatedly stated.

edit on 8/17/2017 by carewemust because: spelling. Getting late. nighty nite!



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 04:43 AM
link   
Good is a very subjective term. Morally upstanding might be a better fit for what you are asking.

This is a question that could be debated from here to the ends of the earth and back without a suitable answer.

Lets say for instance I hate you, despite not knowing you, I could still be a mortally upstanding person if 1. I don't act on my hatred 2. I don't pass on my prejudice for you to others 3. If I treat others with the respect that they have earned and deserve.

That being said those are my personal feelings and would not hold up to a litmus test of any design.

The better question is why would you hate some one for no reason? Its not logical there has to be a reason either learned or naturally occurring.

Naturally acurimg aversions would stem from our past such as fear of snakes and other dangerous creatures. Learned would be the hate for Oakland raiders fans.

I can accept ingrained hate from our Neanderthal monkey brain, learned hate is harder for me as it is often taught with little to no factual knowledge.

An example...

I hate Oakland raiders fans they are all criminal scum I read a story once where they beat a man to death for wearing a 49s jersey to a game and one time my great great grandpappy was best up and mugged by a raiders fan they are all terrible I tell ya....

But as we all know like.02% of Oakland raiders fans are ok....right...
edit on 17-8-2017 by crimsongod21 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 04:45 AM
link   

originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: carewemust

Love Trumps Hate. Right? ?





It should.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 04:46 AM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

Care, I really think you need to stop & reflect. These last 48 hours or so, you've made a bunch of threads in an attempt to rationalize and justify hate and prejudice. We get it. You know some people who hate particular groups for no logical reason, yet are good people to you and/or your loved ones. You & I had a few good dialogues about health care a while back, but I'm seriously starting to question if you meant those things or not. After all, my family or friends may be in the demographic that you're talking about, which means that I doubt we'd get equal access to the healthcare you spoke of. ETA: Remember, my parents grew up during racial segregation so these scenarios are literally recent history for me.

As for the question in the title, I think the answer is a resounding NO. I can understand being suspicious, nervous, scared, excited, repulsed, or attracted to individuals we don't know. But to hate someone for no logical reason is wrong, especially because humans routinely act on our emotions.

Let's assume this "good" person that you know illogically hates a specific demographic. They're a paramedic and they're sent to help at a car crash. One of the wounded turns out to be from the demographic that your friend hates. Is there any guarantee that your friend will treat this person to the fullest of his/her abilities? And what if your friend is a doctor, nurse, electrician, or cook? Is there any guarantee that your friend will serve customers and/or patients from that demographic just as well as they'd serve other customers/patients? Remember, we're not talking about how they'd treat you. I'm talking about how they'd treat the demographic that you admit they illogically hate.

Let's suppose your friend owns a store. Will he/she harass or refuse to serve customers from that illogically hated demographic? If your friend is in human resources for a company, will he/she refuse to hire qualified people from that demographic? If your friend is a politician, will he/she create laws that treat all citizens equally, including the citizens from that demographic? If your friend is a judge or police officer, can he/she be trusted to enforce the laws and decide cases fairly for citizens in that illogically hated demographic?

If the answer is no to any of those, then we're literally talking about discrimination. If your friend hates & acts based on racial factors, then we're talking about racial discrimination. If your friend hates & acts based on cultural or religious factors, then we're talking about bigotry. There's no way we can pretend that this is good or acceptable. And please remember that just because they may be kind to you, that doesn't mean they're kind to the people they illogically hate.

edit on 17-8-2017 by enlightenedservant because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 04:55 AM
link   
a reply to: crimsongod21

as a raider fan i hate the stupid chiiiiieeeeeeeeeeefs tannoy thing.
and travis kelce.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 04:55 AM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

No... I do not think you can.

You cannot be a good father, if you harbour irrational hatred. Why do I say that? Because to harbour such things, unless you guard RIDICULOUSLY carefully against spreading that hatred, means that it will pass from you to your offspring, something that no father ought to do, and be considered "good", either as a man or a parent. I do not believe you can be a good husband while carrying hatred around with you, because hatred is toxic and obsessive by nature, and the only thing with which a married person ought to be obsessed, is performing the role of husband to his spouse, the only devotion he should have, is to that person he married, because otherwise he was not fit to marry in the first place.

I do not believe you can be a good employee, if you harbour hatred toward any potential segment of the customer base, or the rest of the workforce, or the management, purely based on arbitrary and totally irrelevant factors like skin tone, religion, sexuality, gender, or any of the other metrics by which people are routinely marginalised by the terminally witless. People are less likely to respond correctly to all customers with like enthusiasm and level of service, if they actively despise a segment of society for no reason. And no, you cannot be a decent contributing member of the society in which you live, if you carry around unreasonable and irrational loathing of any person or group thereof within that society, or hatred for those living outside it. The reason I say this is simple. If you carry hate of the sort you are talking about within you, the chances are that at some stage, that hatred is going to cause you to act irrationally, and when people do that, they remove value from society, they do not add it. They cause division, damage cohesion, prevent unity and community from forming or damage what may already exist. Whether it is by that derisive glance as they pass the target of their ire in the street, or by way of getting drunk and lashing out, or worse, allowing their mental affliction to grow to the point where they snap and drive a car into a crowd of people, or take to the top of a tall tower with a powerful rifle and begin to simply kill those they dislike, there is damage associated with having members of ones society, wandering about enraged in an irrational manner, with ones fellow human beings.

Anger which has a source of reason and logic is legitimate. Disliking ones government because it systematically refuses to engage with the needs of the people, choosing instead to inflate the wealth of those who have no need of it, choosing to kill indiscriminately in war, rather than choosing to step back and away from conflicts it has no need to be a part of, is totally fair. Having a legitimate grievance with a particular political movement, because it demonstrably damages your country by way of its existence (for example, White Supremacist or for that matter, radical religious groups of pretty much any kind or origin), is absolutely legitimate.

But hating a group of people over irrational fear of them, allowing oneself to generalise to make hating easier, allowing oneself to become the worst sort of person imaginable, simply because one has not the wit or the decency to learn past ones inadequacies, and come to a broader and wiser understanding, not only of current affairs, but also history, is to render oneself an enemy of liberty, and in any country worth living in, that makes one an enemy of the people as a whole, regardless of their race, religion, or politics. Good people do not harbour irrational hate.

It is the measure of a good person, that they be capable of loving their neighbour equally, regardless of their origins, that they be capable of rational thought, have a rational mind more powerful than the lizard brain which is the amygdala, a mind immune to propaganda, and awareness of history and its importance when navigating the present.

Without those things, what you have is a bad person, a person who is simply not very good at personhood, fails to understand it, or any of the things which are vital to it. What you have there is a person who can say, and perhaps spell the word liberty, and while they may be able to spout chapter and verse about its legal definition, can say nothing of what it actually means, without getting it horrifically wrong on every level. What you have there is a person who believes that freedom of speech is equal to freedom from consequence and responsibility.

That is not what I would call a good person.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:00 AM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

By the present definition of "hate," yes, a person can "hate" a specific group and still be a very good person. The issue I have here is that modern idealists have opted to lump way too many concepts into the catch-all hate bucket. Not all fear is hatred, not all anger is hatred, not all fatigue is hatred, apathy isn't hatred, refusal to coddle isn't hatred, rejection of arbitrary challenges to prior societal norms isn't hatred, and frankly not all self righteousness and pride is rooted in hatred. Yet all of those feelings seem to be lumped into "You're a hater" foolish accusations, the word "hate" presently has as much rationality and believability as "racist" does, essentially both are automatic throw aways because of overuse and misatribution. Hatred hangs men from trees, burns down churches, burns police cars, and destroys storefronts... it doesn't just stand around grousing about crap and making hand gestures.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:06 AM
link   
a reply to: TrueBrit

Parenting and marriage are judged by how you treat your kids and spouse, period. A lot of the stuff presently called hatred is actually fear for the future generations of one's own family. We've had sequential generations of rural whites fighting uphill battles to personally reach the American dream while being forced to subsidize groups they never personally held down nor were responsible for the failure to thrive of. Love of their own children and a dream of something better for them has fed anger and fear, both of which are righteous and understandable, but to combat it and ensure the agenda is pushed these have been falsely called hatreds.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:09 AM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

While not infusing politics into my answer...

Yes, quite simply. And it's totally normal.

There are a lot of times when we go with our instincts. Sometimes I just get a super bad vibe about someone and the hate light turns on.

Hate is fine, okay? This is true.

Hate can be felt as an impulse that keeps us out of harm's way. Sometimes it's an intuition that we interpret as irrational hate.

How this feeling is channeled and expressed is very, very important. This is what makes a person good or bad.






edit on 17-8-2017 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: NarcolepticBuddha
a reply to: carewemust

While not infusing politics into my answer...

Yes, quite simply. And it's totally normal.

There are a lot of times when we go with our instincts. Sometimes I just get a super bad vibe about someone and the hate light turns on.

Hate is fine, okay? This is true.

Hate can be felt as an impulse that keeps us out of harm's way.

How this feeling is channeled and expressed is very, very important. This is what makes a person good or bad.











Is it hate ?

Or is it the flight or fight response that is ingrained in our souls, we need to learn the difference, as modern captive slaves we fight our instincts.

We did not get here by being complacent.

This complacency in our modern world will literally lead to our demise.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:20 AM
link   
a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I made an edit to clarify before you posted.

Here is a key line I added.


Sometimes it's an intuition that we interpret as irrational hate.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:22 AM
link   
a reply to: burdman30ott6

Fear is not something which ought be supported. It is weak, cowardly, and foolish, and to pass that on to ones offspring, as haters have a tendency to do, is to damage ones offspring, no matter how many baseball games, fishing trips, and hugs might come and go in the meantime. To pass on faulty thinking to ones offspring is the worst disservice you can do to a child, other than serious physical and psychological abuse of course. You cannot operate a marriage in a proper manner, and be said to be treating your spouse well, if your decision making is based on fear, if your reactions to stimulus are based on unreasonable fear, because to be fearful irrationally, which is what we are talking about here, is to be weak, and to be weak oneself weakens ones marriage.

Irrational fear (which, by the way, you have to be rational to correctly identify), weakens every bond between people, whether it be by blood or matrimony, by community or any other method. Irrational fear is what hatred is all about, it is weak, and weak people do very little for the communities they have to do with.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:25 AM
link   
a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha


Nice , I was thinking pretty much the same thing .



I need to learn how to clarify my thoughts on paper as such a little better.
edit on 17-8-2017 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:32 AM
link   
a reply to: TrueBrit

Fear has been one of the driving forces in keeping humanity not only alive, but the most successful creature in the Earth's ecosystem. Fear caused humans to forge tools, craft clothes and shelters, learn to store food and resources, and even serves as the primary rationale for our religious belief systems. To portray fear as cowardice, weak, or foolish is inane.

As for your position on rearing kids and being a good spouse, how long have you been married and how many kids are you parenting? Speak from experience, not from artificial social expectations, dude.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:35 AM
link   
a reply to: carewemust


Yes



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:37 AM
link   
a reply to: burdman30ott6

With respect, no.

Fear did not provide us with the neurological capacity to work out how to use tools. The amygdala has not a damn thing to do with higher reasoning in the brain, or put another way, the fear response and higher and critical reasoning capacity a human brain expresses, issue from entirely different regions of the brain itself.

Fear responses are simplistic, not nuanced, nor in the slightest bit complicated. Higher reasoning capacity, which is what allowed our species to work out how to make and use tools, is nuanced, deep and complex. Its responses to stimuli, while slower, are many hundreds of times more accurate and effective over time, than the responses of the amygdala. For example, flapping at a wasp to get it to go away is a fear response, but may wind up being more likely to cause a sting. Pre-treating yourself or the area you are in with a wasp repellent however, is a critical reasoning solution, derived from awareness of the importance of forward planning, which has nothing to do with the amygdala or the fear response, what so ever.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:49 AM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

I understand your point and my answer is no.

It does my heart good to know you are not a white supremacist. Your question is innocent and you have no idea how these people think. Let's say you are a black man. You could be the best black man in the whole world, it would not matter they still don't want you in the world. They don't want to see you.

You are a germ to Trump.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 05:54 AM
link   
a reply to: burdman30ott6

I am the father of one twelve year old with Aspergers Autism.

He is the sweetest, most insane chap I have ever had the pleasure of interacting with, and I love him deeply, despite the fact that he can be an annoying sod at the best of times. As for relationships, things between myself and his mother got poisoned by her extended family, before he was even born. For the sake of relative peace (something I never had as a child), I stepped out, before it became a full blown war between myself and her family, since she was unwilling to go to bat for me, and prepared, because of HER fear, to believe the worst.

There was no winning in that situation. I waited ten long years to hear from my sons mother, and when she did finally get in touch, I was right in there to back my son up, and provide him all the love that I had been unable to be around to give him previously.

I never, EVER pass on a single sliver of negativity to that boy. I teach him the way I dealt with what he is going through, I show him by my word and deed, how to be a man, and encourage him to achieve more than I did, not because I wish to live through him, but because I want him to have the best he can get for himself, to do the best with what he has, to maximise his potential for the simple sake of doing it.

I hope that when he becomes a man, he will be able to master himself well enough that he can see to the far dot that is his future, and perhaps even have a hand in building the futures of others. He is a smart, open hearted but fiercely smart child, and has the potential to do a great deal of good for himself and for others.

If I was about passing on my weaknesses to him, not my strengths, I would be a poor father. As it is, and for all that there are missing years, that is not my manner of conducting the business of parenthood, and so I am doing a decent job.




top topics



 
4
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join