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Mysterious Ringed Structure Appears on Canadian Beach

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posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 12:54 PM
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I'm going with shipwreck. Two have been found in the past, there are another 798 to be found:

natureinfocus.blog...

www.digitaljournal.com...




posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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Here's a picture of the wreck of the UK's most famous sunken galleon, The Mary Rose, salvaged in the 1980s after capsizing on its maiden voyage during the reign of Henry VIII around 500 years earlier.

You can see that the thick horizontal beams (jutting toward the camera) once supported crew decks, and are more or less at right angles to the ship's outer hull.

If you rotate the image in your mind's eye, you can see that when the ship came to rest on one side (which it definitely would have done, for obvious reasons!) the horizontal beams (that used to support decks) would be jutting skyward at a fairly sharp angle.

That, imho, is what we are looking at in the OP pics. Beams that used to support decks, pointing skyward because the ship came to rest on one side, with the remains of the hull poking up beside them.



posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: pavil

I got it. One of the best games I've ever played.



posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: onehuman

All of a sudden that much is revealed? Are you sure?

With those pices of wood sticking out like that someone must have been injured before..

Anyway, my first thought was a fort.



posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: RAY1990
a reply to: onehuman

I think it is very rare to build a ship with planks that are placed vertically in the hull.

To me they are clearly placed upwards (or downwards) whereas the usual setup is for the planks to be placed horizontally along the hull.

Many reasons exist for this, a main one is weight and a lot less ribs to connect the whole vessel together.

I honestly don't think it's a vessel. If it is, it was designed by an idiot or somebody who didn't derive their ship-building ability from traditional methods.

In other words it could be a non-western design or a highly experimental one, or built by an idiot.

Or as I feel, not a vessel at all.

THis beams would be the ribs to which the horizontal boards are affixed. In fact if you look closely at the picture, where the beams come out of the sand, you can see the top of one horizontal board. I would guess that given they would get the full tidal forces on them, the horizontal boards were torn from the wreck a long time ago.



posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 09:01 PM
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a reply to: Perfectenemy

What's with the C&C reference?
Hahahaha....



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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originally posted by: visitedbythem
Planks don't go that direction, and they are too close together to be ribs./ I crewed on an antique wooden racing schooner


A racing schooner, made to run light and fast in any breeze
Didn't crew an old ship of the line, a deep hulled cargo ship made for Atlantic crossings with a hull full of heavy products, iron guns, but a racing schooner

I don't really think you are all that up on wooden hull engineering because you crewed a wooden hulled racing schooner, just saying
edit on 16-8-2017 by Raggedyman because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 11:42 AM
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My first impression was it being a palisade (a stake wall). As such, there could be a very old fort under all that sand.

This makes me think of the legend of Langurroc. The story here is that beneath the big dunes of Crantock, near Newquay in Cornwall, England, there was once a village. It was apparently buried during a sand storm, and hence the dunes. Another idea is of a meteorite impact, but without either a crater and/or minerals it’s dubious. Particularly interesting though, especially given this thread, is the theory that it was caused by a tsunami - this itself could have been the result of the Great Lisbon Earthquake, All Saints Day, 1755. Now looking at the the location of this find in Canada, if the tsunami did indeed cause widespread coastal damage on both sides of the Atlantic, to include funnelling substantial waves along the Bristol Channel, then it could potentially have dislodged enough sand as to bury a small village or fortification. Or it could indeed have beached some ships.

Actually, that particular tsunami did reach Canada: upload.wikimedia.org...

It is probably more likely that the Yankee Gale would be such a cause, but I don’t think the tsunami should be ruled out until there is a valid date on whatever that thing is.


edit on 16th August 2017 by VigiliaProcuratio because:



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 11:49 AM
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look like protection to me



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: Wedni

I’m inclined to agree. If I’m correct with the tsunami idea then we’re looking at 6 months after the start of the Bay of Fundy Campaign. I’m willing to wager that it’s a small fishing stockade which belonged to either the Mi'kmaq or the French, whom were both allied against the British.

As to the fate of the stockade, I’m thinking to rule out weather because its walls would surely not be standing if it was, say, a nor’easter. Secured into normal land, maybe, but surely not on a beach. I’ll guess that stockades were not necessary 100 years later so if the Yankee Gale had anything to do with it then it, or indeed a previous hurricane, would probably have just blown it into the sea. Bear in mind that we’re probably not talking about an actual fort, unless it’s part of what may have been a larger fortification further inland, but rather a small defensive structure to protect fishermen.

Anyway, I haven’t been able to find anything historical about the tsunami impacting upon the Maritimes at all, at least not to the extent of affecting military activities. The islands apparently have very big tides at the best of times, but one thing worth considering about Cascumpec Bay is that there are considerable sand deposits and a natural reef there so it is certainly understandable as to how anything on a beach in that area could be inundated with sand. As such, it could be feasible that the tsunami would have had the potential to disrupt the reef and thus shift a substantial amount of sand.

So the big question is; was the cause an ordinary tide for the area, a storm or, indeed, a major geological event?

Naturally, this is all assuming it’s a fort rather than a ship.




posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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Actually, I have a strong feeling that it was a watchtower.

Also, this...


Reports from Antigua, Martinique, and Barbados note that the sea first rose by 1.5m, followed by large waves.

A wooden structure on the shores of a barrier island could have been vulnerable.

edit on 16th August 2017 by VigiliaProcuratio because:



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: onehuman


It reminds me of a Viking long ship, but the planks ran laterally on one of those. The shape does bow out like a long ship did though. I doubt if the wood would survive from one of those to now however. It does look very old.
edit on 16-8-2017 by openminded2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 06:44 PM
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a reply to: onehuman

Most likely a shipwreck, but I like thinking it may be the spikes on the back of a really old dinosaur or prehistoric gator or something. One can only dream!



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:29 PM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman

originally posted by: visitedbythem
Planks don't go that direction, and they are too close together to be ribs./ I crewed on an antique wooden racing schooner


A racing schooner, made to run light and fast in any breeze
Didn't crew an old ship of the line, a deep hulled cargo ship made for Atlantic crossings with a hull full of heavy products, iron guns, but a racing schooner

I don't really think you are all that up on wooden hull engineering because you crewed a wooden hulled racing schooner, just saying



She was built in 1930 for George Roosevelt. President Roosevelsts nephew. 77 foot. teak decks, red velvet cabins. Mine was by the galley. I could smell the ripe pineapples hanging in baskets. As crew I worked on the boat. Sanded refinished inspected, sewed sails, you name it. Here she is

edit on 16-8-2017 by visitedbythem because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:44 PM
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Wow, very cool! 😊👍
a reply to: visitedbythem



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:57 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse




Don't forget to not tell too many people about it


I think the secret is out now



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 02:26 AM
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originally posted by: visitedbythem

originally posted by: Raggedyman

originally posted by: visitedbythem
Planks don't go that direction, and they are too close together to be ribs./ I crewed on an antique wooden racing schooner


A racing schooner, made to run light and fast in any breeze
Didn't crew an old ship of the line, a deep hulled cargo ship made for Atlantic crossings with a hull full of heavy products, iron guns, but a racing schooner

I don't really think you are all that up on wooden hull engineering because you crewed a wooden hulled racing schooner, just saying



She was built in 1930 for George Roosevelt. President Roosevelsts nephew. 77 foot. teak decks, red velvet cabins. Mine was by the galley. I could smell the ripe pineapples hanging in baskets. As crew I worked on the boat. Sanded refinished inspected, sewed sails, you name it. Here she is


Nice long lines, looks s if it was made for racing, not just cruising
Ideal for running along in a light breeze

That boat in the surf is not
Its a heavy deck, well amored, work horse.

Nothing beats the wind in the rigging at night



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 06:18 AM
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Nice find, I think it's a shipwreck judging by the curved angle of the wooden posts.




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