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Acupuncture. Does it work? Really?

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posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: MrCrow

My husband had a rotator cuff injury. He could NOT bring his hand above his head.
Doctors threatened him with lifetime mobility loss but there was no way he was going to go into surgery.
The pain was intense.
He went to a acupuncturist and after 3 visits - he has nearly all the mobility back in his shoulder.

I went to a acuPRESSUREist for a bad leg - it was one of the most painful things I've ever been through - I mean huge pain. When it was over? I can walk now without a limp. I've been pain and limp free for over a year. I'll go back if I have to but I don't see a need yet.

I hope Mrs. Crow gets better soon!

peace




posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: MrCrow
(sorry for the Layout problems)
For those who say Chinese medicine is a hoax,
its been practiced for 3000+ years blah blah blah.

Your body is nothing more than electrical signals to
and from your brain.

I met a very famous acupuncturist by the name of Dr. Margo Parker,
she was on the cover of Time magazine as the Acupuncturist of
the stars( Movie Stars).

Kinda strange, I worked with her husband and we entered
her office she was placing a small adhesive ball to the back
of a clients ear. I asked later what it was used for, she explained
some people don't like Dramamine. When you apply pressure to
the small ball on the reverse side of the earlobe it stops you from
feeling nauseous . (fun fact some people don't have earlobes!)

I also ended up with the Asian Flu that knocked me for a loop for
5 days, severe fever (I felt like I was freezing ) Margo gave me a
small vial with herbal pills capped with a cork on my 3rd day ,
this made the 4th and 5th day tolerable. Over the counter didn't
touch the symptoms.

Back to the Brain an electrical signals. Just read a paper on a
researcher that was trying to find out why pickle juice,
cranberry juice stops muscle cramps.

Well it turns out Muscle cramps are a Brain signal lie.
They found out there is no reasonfor muscle cramps to happen.
Drinking pickle juice over powers your brain from tricking
the muscle cramp because it is "Sour".

I myself tested this with and alternate "pain" method to trick my
brain. I get Calf and Quadriceps cramps and night some severe.
So I get a cramp and I pinch my skin on
my inner arm between my Bicep and Triceps muscle almost
instantly the cramp stops.

Read up on Ninjutsu pressure points you might be amazed at what you will learn.


Peace
edit on 14-8-2017 by TucsonOne because: layout

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edit on 14-8-2017 by TucsonOne because: fixed



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:10 PM
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originally posted by: TobyFlenderson
a reply to: MrCrow

My opinion is that if it was bs it wouldn't have survived several thousand years of practice.


Plenty of bs practices last 1000s of years. All religions cant be true but there are several that are thousands of years old and still going strong. We've been doing female genital mutilation for a couple thousand years, still going strong in some countries. Just because something has been happening for a long time, or a lot of people have been doing it, doesn't mean there is something to it or that it is in any way good or correct.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: BelowLowAnnouncement

The difference between the Oriental Medical paradigm and religions extant today...is ones efficasy is proven by observable results...the other...not so observable.

Trauma preparations of herbs and acupuncture combined and on their own are very well recorded and back up time and time again using modern scientific method.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:24 PM
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a reply to: MrCrow

Having both experienced it and seen it used in a medical setting on children I can say 100% it works. The science behind it is sound etc.

The only downside for me when I used it was its duration of effect was quite short in terms of pain relief



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: BelowLowAnnouncement

I believe your comparisons are faulty in that the stated outcome of religions can not be tested until after death. Therefore, we don't know if they are faulty.

As for genital mutilation, wether it be male or female, the expected outcome is achieved each time: to live up to some religious or ethnic ideal.

Can you point to any medical procedure, or any procedure that is said to affect a physical/material result, that has been around that long, has been practiced on every continent (maybe not Antartica) and yet is faulty?

Perhaps I was not artful in my comment, but comparing spiritual "procedures" with physical ones is apples and oranges to me.


edit on 14-8-2017 by TobyFlenderson because: clarification



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

I absolutely agree. The right person does make a difference. Acupuncture is not textbook medicine. It is an individualized treatment approach that is dependent on the right diagnosis.

Oftentimes, the needles are not immediately placed at the site of pain or injury. Points distant from the site of pain are usually needled first to reduce the pain in the affected area. The effect can be very quick and this allows for the practitioner to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment quite quickly. For other conditions, points distal to the affected area(s) often have a more powerful effect than points close to the affected area.

Chinese medicine diagnoses on the basis of patterns, not diseases. It takes time to change these patterns, so the effect of one treatment is not always of long duration but the cumulative effect often brings about lasting results. I have seen this many times over my years of practice.

I have practiced acupuncture and Chinese medicine for more than a decade. Some conditions respond very quickly, others take more time. Chronic conditions, like autoimmunity require a multi-pronged approach where acupuncture is just one modality used to help one affected by it.

Acupuncture is not a sham. It truly works when it is understood and performed correctly.


edit on 14-8-2017 by nuumm because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:45 PM
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Thank you all for your replies, I really appreciate it. However, I still remain sceptical of it's efficacy.

PS
I've just re-read my original post and I must apologise for the spelling typos! I can no longer edit it either - outside the time limit. Perhaps I need acupuncture in my fingers and eyes :/


'Night ATS, time to see if the Perseid's are still rampant.
edit on 1482017 by MrCrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: MrCrow

Nothing is wrong with a healthy dose of skepticism. I have converted many skepticism into believers because they have felt a noticeable and lasting difference with acupuncture.

There are good acupuncturists and bad acupuncturists. The key is to find one that knows what they are doing. In the hands of someone who knows what they are doing, acupuncture can be a powerful technique.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: MrCrow

Nothing is wrong with a healthy dose of skepticism. I have converted many skeptics into believers because they have felt a noticeable and lasting difference with acupuncture.

There are good acupuncturists and bad acupuncturists. The key is to find one that knows what they are doing. In the hands of someone who knows what they are doing, acupuncture can be a powerful technique.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: MrCrow

I don't know about the specifics, but a lad I know got several ribs busted (He refs for impact wrestling) and he was in such pain that he went for acupuncture and it fixed his pain by the next day. So, maybe there is something to it.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: nuumm

So how you do find one who is good? Without having to traipse through the bad? I seriously don't want my other half to suffer - and on-line reviews are... mixed. Word-of-mouth is a reluctant commodity here.
edit on 1482017 by MrCrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: MrCrow

I am not sure where you live, but where I live, acupuncture can be used by physios, naturopaths and chiropractors. I would make sure the person your wife is seeing is trained specifically in acupuncture and Chinese medicine. The others really don't get the opportunity to fully understand the subtle specifics involved in diagnosis and many may have only 200-300 hours of training. A Chinese medicine program is going to give at least 1500-2000 hours of training and a good chunk of that time will be spent on diagnosis.

The second thing I would look for is someone who can answer your questions and explain things in terms that can be understood by you and your wife. I tend to use a lot of metaphor to explain concepts of Chinese medicine so my patients can understand. If they can only explain things in terms that you cannot relate to then I would move on. It shows that their understanding may not be in depth enough. I would avoid practitioners who are secretive as well--the work is being done on your body (or your wife's) and you have a right to know what they are doing and why.

The third thing I would pay attention to is whether or not they are recommending things that your wife can do between treatments: a change in diet for instance. My experience has been that for many chronic conditions the acupuncture treatment alone will not completely resolve things and that 'homework' can do a lot to further the effects of the treatments.

The goal of any practitioner should be to resolve a patient's issues as quickly and as efficiently as possible. Some conditions resolve quite quickly (1-4 treatment) whereas others, especially chronic conditions, can take a very long time to resolve. You mentioned in your opening post that your wife is seeing an acupuncturist for minor conditions--if it is an acute sprain for example 1-2 treatments should resolve things. However, if there is a chronic issue or hormone imbalances are an issue the problem will take longer to resolve and will likely require other modalities such as herbs and/or dietary change to change it.

I hope this helps.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: MrCrow

One other thing I would consider is the educational background of the practitioner beyond that of Chinese medicine. This is especially important if your wife is dealing with any chronic issues or is taking any medication for other issues. The practitioner should have a good understanding of 'western' medical science. They don't need to be doctors or scientists, but they should, for example, understand risks associated with acupuncture on someone who is taking blood thinners or points that would be contraindicated on someone with an enlarged liver. The same goes for herbs: they should be able to and be willing to research known herb-drug interactions and come up with alternatives should contraindications be found.



posted on Aug, 14 2017 @ 06:46 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: rickymouse

What part of your calf? Quite a few meridians run through the inside and outside of the calf...it would be good info for further diagnosis


It is sort of in the whole front section. It almost seems the bone is even sore I was told by doctors many years ago that it was gout. Boy, were they off on their diagnosis. I know what is related to it now, but still not what causes it. I feel the clog in my colon I get, Beezoars, is what presses on some nerve.



posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 06:53 AM
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a reply to: MrCrow

If they use cupping or moxa you have a greater chance that they take their job seriously...
Nuumm explained it perfectly.
Look for someone that is only a license acupuncturist instead of something else, and an acupuncturist.



posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: nuumm

Thank you for your intelligent insight.



posted on Aug, 15 2017 @ 06:35 PM
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originally posted by: MrCrow
Thank you all for your replies, I really appreciate it. However, I still remain sceptical of it's efficacy.

PS
I've just re-read my original post and I must apologise for the spelling typos! I can no longer edit it either - outside the time limit. Perhaps I need acupuncture in my fingers and eyes :/


'Night ATS, time to see if the Perseid's are still rampant.


Yet - think about it - a lot could be gained for nothing lost...

peace



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: MrCrow
The lady who did my acupuncture was Chinese. I have not had anymore pain to ever go back for another treatment. But if I do, I will make sure to seek out a Chinese person.



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