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Mispronunciation of words

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posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 10:59 AM
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Freakin Yanks bitching about bad English, come on people

And nerd goddess, it's "doco"




posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 11:40 AM
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For me it's "should of" instead of "should HAVE " or "should've ". It makes me insane.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 11:45 AM
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originally posted by: FHomerK

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: FHomerK

The differences in annunciation are called dialect.

Wasn't that pretty much the same mentality behind the proposal that california schools should accept ebonics?

No that was more culture. Dialect is like what bostonians say when they say 'park the car'.

Pack tha caw.

Lol, thats dialect. There are tons of that. We chuckle at those I guess because they're white, too.

I say that because those hating on ebonics are more likely bigots or even racist.

If you moved to a foreign country would you want to learn the language or expect them to learn yours?



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 11:46 AM
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originally posted by: Slinki
For me it's "should of" instead of "should HAVE " or "should've ". It makes me insane.

All three are correct. I prefer coulda, shoulda, woulda. Sounds funnier...



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: FHomerK

My son and I were taking about the excitement of some professions.

He said he just wanted to, "Live bi-curiously through the adventures and work of others."






I immediately disowned him and banished him to the frozen wastelands of the north.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 11:49 AM
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I had to email a local TV station about the "ax" thing. It took a while, but the offending reporter finally said it correctly.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman
Freakin Yanks bitching about bad English, come on people

And nerd goddess, it's "doco"


Have you ever used subtitles on YouTube? British English in the subtitles is unintelligible. When American English is spoken the subtitles are correct.

The Brits like to think they're the experts in everything, yet they mispronounce the hell out of French, deliberately, because they've always hated the French.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: AlephOne
a reply to: FHomerK

Guess "the rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain" is no longer germane on American terrain.


Laughed my a** off at that one. Stars! Stars!



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: FHomerK

The differences in annunciation are called dialect.



You actually provided an excellent example of what OP is getting at with your own misuse of the word "annunciation"...it sounds similar to "enunciation", but it is a totally different word, with a totally different meaning. That's because the vowel sounds were either never taught to you, or you chose to disregard their importance (or you were just playing on words, which is what I hope was the case here) and pronounce them the same even though they are two completely different sounds entirely.

That is not dialect. That is improper reading comprehension and use of the English language, just like people writing "there" in place of "their" or "your" instead of "you're" because they sound alike...but their meanings are completely different. That can be expected from people who are learning English for the first time, but it should not be coming from anyone who's first language is English and they've at least got better than a 4th grade level grasp of their own native language.

Some of it is willful ignorance, but I believe that the biggest culprit is the fact that no-one really seems to care much about preserving either written or spoken language rules...they're becoming more and more archaic with each passing year...and the teachers and parents of our new generations have been taught by the same apathetic system, so it's a trickle-down effect. The gift that keeps on taking.

I get where OP is coming from, and it irks me sometimes too. I taught myself to read at the age of four, and was taught phonics by a Brit long before it ever became something people wanted to get hooked on. Every time I hear someone say the word "nuclear" but pronounce it "nuke-yoo-ler", my bitch slapper starts itching...a certain former POTUS did that, and it stood out as one of the top ten reasons why I couldn't take anything else that came out of his mouth seriously.

However at the same time, I caution against the practice of focusing on spelling and grammar and proper pronunciation of other people's words to the point of tunnel vision. That's how people fail to receive the message being conveyed within those words...which should always be the first thing they pay attention to anyway.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: FHomerK

I'm from Tennessee, so pretty much everything I say has an apostrophe in it.

Kit'n
Hunt'n
Ya'll
Hoos'at?

As in


"Hoos'at in my field? Ya'll better not be hunt'n kit'ns!!"



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: FHomerK

If that bothers you, don't come down here to the SE part of the US.....it will drive you up the wall.

Down here it's not a "window" it's a "Win-der"

It's not a "spatula" it's a "spatch-lur"

It's not a "ambulance" it's a "am-bu-lance"

It's not a "orange" it's a "ur-rin-j"

It's not "over there" it's "over yonder"

It's not "far away" it's "out aways"

It's not "siren" it's "sigh-reen"

Also, most words that start with "str" are said with "skr"

Ah crossed the skreet before that am-bu-lance drove by with it's sigh-reens a going.

Also:

It's not a "Banana" it's a "Nanner"

It's not a "potato" it's a "tater"

It's not a "tomato"......it's a "mate-er"

And remember: here in the South, we avoid using the word "European"......except when we have some drunk guy in our yard:

"European on mah lawn, and I'm gonna call the cops!"






posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: tigertatzen




However at the same time, I caution against the practice of focusing on spelling and grammar and proper pronunciation of other people's words to the point of tunnel vision. That's how people fail to receive the message being conveyed within those words...which should always be the first thing they pay attention to anyway.


The best point, we should be hearing people not examining their every word for mistakes. Language is fluid. People come from many backgrounds and even many people we consider genius don't always use perfect English.

You should have a comma after However and you should have written conveyed by instead of conveyed within.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: FHomerK
I think partof the problem is that people are not reading so much, so they pronounce words the way they think they've heard them and that has a feedback effect on their spelling. For example, a couple of times on ATS I've been addressed as "mang".
I've been noticing for about three decades that people have been adding an extra "d" or "ed" to the end of words. I was seeing it in written messages long before I realised that it was reflecting pronunciation.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 05:29 PM
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How about nuclear? Most people (even newscasters, who are supposed to at least be able to pronounce words correctly! Jesus!) say "nuc-U-lar" instead of "nu-clee-ar." Ugh.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl
Also I couldn't help noticing, in January, that New York was televising their "ElecTORIAL College".



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 06:11 PM
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I tell you what irritates me and has for a long time. Almost EVERYONE does this too!!

People will say, "I could care less," with the intention of conveying that they don't care. For the sake of all that is holy, it's "I COULDN'T care less," not "I could care less"!!! It really digs under my skin. It's a pet peeve of mine.
edit on 10-8-2017 by SpeakerofTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: SpeakerofTruth
I tell you what irritates me and has for a long time. Almost EVERYONE does this too!!

People will say, "I could care less," with the intention of conveying that they don't care. For the sake of all that is holy, it's "I COULDN'T care less," not "I could care less"!!! It really digs under my skin. It's a pet peeve of mine.


wow, really? so sarcasm is not a concept that registers for you?

and it seems that ask WAS pronounced 'ax' to start with:

Why Chaucer Said 'Ax' Instead Of 'Ask,' And Why Some Still Do

people who spend so much time getting nit-picky and pedantic about other people's language should take a look in the mirror and ask themselves what they're trying to prove about their own supposed intellect or education, that they'd rather spend their energy on that instead of focusing on whether communication is happening.

gatekeeping is an ugly, ugly look.

my two cents

edit on 10-8-2017 by fiverx313 because: clarity



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

Thanks for the correction, Grammar Nazi.

Get off your high horse. There is no 'proper' english without the 'flavor' culture and dialect add to it.

You should realize this after you graduate from college.

I didn't. I'm underedumakated, can't stand stiff shirts that hold their degree in front of everyone like a badge.
You know what BS, MS and PHD stand for? Bull S**, More S***, Piled Higher and Deeper. Every single post of mine has grammar, spelling and punctuation mistakes. So what? This isn't a college boards exam. its the wonderful screwed up internet where everyone can have a say, without being ridiculed for "Improperness", lol.

Imo, content is what counts, not "Proper English".

Go spank a child, teacher, we don't need that kind of education......



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: fiverx313

"Sarcasm?"

No, the two sentences have completely different connotations.

To say, "I could care less," implies that a person cares to some degree.

To say, "I couldn't care less," implies that one doesn't care in the slightest.

Words matter in regards to meaning.



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 08:11 PM
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First world problems.



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