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Sometimes Trees Just Don't Give A Crap

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posted on Aug, 8 2017 @ 09:11 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

The only thing i disagree with is your claim that "trees remove pollution". CO2 is not pollution, all life on Earth is carbon based because of the existence of CO2. Without CO2 there would be no life on Earth.




posted on Aug, 8 2017 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

Wonderful thread. Thank you!

Sharing unique "Square trees" from an old thread. A few miles north of the Panama Canal Zone is 'the valley of square trees.' This is the only known place in the world where trees have rectangular trunks.



The square trees are part of the cottonwood family and are also being grown at the University of Florida to find out if they retain their squareness in a different environment. Even the tree rings, each showing a year's growth, are square.

El Valle De Anton is the largest continually inhabited volcanic crater in the world.

The crater is also home to the golden little frogs which are unique and indigenous solely to El Valle.



El Valle De Anton - Panama

Strange Indeed.

Square Trees thread



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 03:07 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

Moan the trees!



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 08:21 AM
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Somewhere in my neighborhood there used to be a tree that was in the process of "eating" a cement paver. It was a typical paver that you'd use to make a patio, maybe 6" x 12" and an inch thick. It was pretty high off the ground, about 5 or 6 feet, and I can't imagine how it stayed there long enough for the tree to start growing around it. I can't find that tree anymore, I think it must have been cut down.



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus


At first I thought, wow a nice and 'normal' reply from Mason, then I read the rest. I should know better by now.



I will catch up on the vids and more posts later tonight. Love this thread! And Mason...step away from the forest!



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 09:57 AM
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I will leave this here.





posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 10:17 AM
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originally posted by: Night Star
At first I thought, wow a nice and 'normal' reply from Mason...


Why in the world would you think the words 'nice' and 'normal' could be used in conjunction with me?



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Must have been delusional. What was in that drink you gave me? Oh wait, it was a pixie drink.



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 11:19 AM
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i'll need to grab a few snaps of the trees that combat the built environment in glasgow , some great fence eating trees here



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

The fence-eating tree is the best!!! Hands down. Awesome thread. Love trees. Totally a forest kind of girl!



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

I tend to believe that humans require trees in our habitat. There are many places, like where I live, where suburbanisation wiped out one type of ecosystem 20+ years ago, but because of every new house having new trees planted and nature and watersheds working the way they do, an entirely new ecosystem has formed that draws people to certain areas because of how forested they have become. And when those new people move in they plant more trees and other flora, and birds and whatnot spread the seeds. Eventually in A lot if places were going to have entirely new forested ecosystems.

This site is a total circle **** for local development, and what they don't tell you is that 100 years ago, much less 60 years ago, this site didn't exist. The "Great Trinity Forest" used to be river flood plains on the prairie, as well as the sites of several gravel mines, illegal garbage dumps, a former regional land fill, a current regional land fill, a sewage treatment plant, a water treatment plant, archialogical hot spot, possible pre-clovis site, and that the forest is only there because that's where all the silt and seeds from the suburbs upriver get trapped and have been left undisturbed to grow. But there are some great pictures.

dfwurbanwildlife.com...



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 09:47 PM
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I still love climbing trees.
When I was a kid we had the "Monkey Club."
The one that could climb the highest earned the title of "King Monkey."
Competition was intense at times.
Some bones were broken.



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

I had a pet Raccoon as a kid and he could out climb every kid in the neighborhood ...Never seen any broken bones but lots of bruises and scrapes ...the Raccoon ,not so much .



posted on Aug, 9 2017 @ 09:56 PM
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originally posted by: Raxoxane
I have such a tree in my garden
I call it my Fukushima tree.There's quite a fascinating backstory,well fascinating to me and one of my best friends.The night before the Fukushima catastrophe,there was a big storm in this area,over the town 8 clix away,and out here in the Bush.This Syringa tree in my garden blew over and now grows horizontally,and Thrives
My best friend's husband is clairvoyant,and she told me sometime after,that he told her a large Ufo went over the town,he could feel it and "tracked" it till it went into the ocean off Mozambique,the neighbouring country close by.

Now whether That part is true,i cannot say.But i do recall a lot of storm damage in the town,and rumours of tall trees being severed cleanly at their tops,like a straight cut.Lots of people called it a "strange" storm at the time for reasons they couldn't quantify.

Awesome thread and pics,s+f
I have seen a swath of trees on the edge of a creek bed that had limbs sheared over about 100 yards at a uniform level. Around 20 foot high.
Straight line.
It looked like a flying object of some sort went through, but there was no debris of a vehicle.
Damndest thing.

edit on 9-8-2017 by skunkape23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2017 @ 06:46 AM
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originally posted by: CreationBro

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: Night Star


I love that picture Night Star, it reminds me of a story near and dear to my heart.

One time I was walking with this little boy into the woods and he said, "Mr. Mason, it's really dark and I'm scared."

And I said, "You're scared, kid?!? What about me? I gotta walk out of here alone!"



Oh i get it; because you eventually realized the boy was a figment of your mushroom induced psychosis.

You trippy guy you. 😂

Let's not forget to give a tip of the hat to our mycologically inclined friends. Many trees rely on them.



posted on Aug, 11 2017 @ 01:04 AM
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I love your thread. I'm always at peace among the trees and if I could live in a treehouse (like the one pictured), I would. Then I could hug my tree every moment I felt the urge.




posted on Aug, 11 2017 @ 01:57 AM
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originally posted by: FauxMulder
The old saying goes "life will find a way". Trees love to prove this saying correct. A resilient bunch, they are the oldest living organism on earth. Trees do not die of old age. They remove pollution from the air. They can flood their leaves with chemicals called phenolics when insects try to eat them. They can help you find your way when lost in the woods. They even cool down the air, not only by providing shade but by releasing water vapor into the air.

And sometimes they just don't give a crap what happens to them, they keep on keeping on.

I get knocked down, but I get up again.


What came first the tree or the silo?


The only tree to survive after a tsunami hit this area of Japan


See, life finds a way


You can strike them down but they'll come back 4 times as strong


They are stronger than rocks


They can do splits


Driftwood tree


Land has fallen away? No problem!


Maybe one day this little guy...


Will be like this


Really a fence!? Pffffft Nom Nom Nom!


More Crazy Trees
Some random tree facts for your brain cells

And the oldest:

The world’s oldest known living tree sprouted sometime during the last Ice Age, roughly 9,550 years ago. This 16-foot spruce in the Dalarna province of Sweden may look more like a Charlie Brown Christmas Tree, but don’t be fooled: this little guy’s root system got started back when the British Isles were still connected to Europe by an ice bridge.



awesome pictures thank you for sharing



posted on Aug, 11 2017 @ 03:21 AM
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There is something very inherently special about trees that we have yet to fully understand.

In the beginning we have the tree of knowledge and the forbidden fruit it produced.

Christ our Lord was sacrificed from a tree so that all who believe in his resurrection would be saved.

Then we have the tree of life in Revelation 22 as it describes the layout of Heaven.

I have no idea what all three of these have in common, but I feel there is some kind of clue in trees that is still waiting to be found.

Great thread and thank you for sharing this.



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