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Marijuana devastated Colorado, don’t legalize it nationally

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posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 12:48 PM
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I found this USA today opinion piece via Yahoo. The author makes claims that the aims of legalizing Marijuana have not been meet but actually made things worse. He states that the arrest rates for blacks and latinos have gone up for marijuana possession in Colorado. Also, he claims that studies show that marijuana use is causing minority students to fail courses in universities in Colorado. As for additional tax revenue, the author claims that marijuana has only brought in less than 1.5% additional tax revenue. Take a look at the article and tell me what you think.


Marijuana devastated Colorado, don't legalize it nationally




posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: feldercarb

It is after all, a opinion.


Senator Cory Booker introduced the Marijuana Justice Act in an effort to legalize marijuana across the nation and penalize local communities that want nothing to do with this dangerous drug.


How many people have died from Marijuana? What are these "dangers" ?



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: feldercarb

Legalization is still restrictive but draws people from out of state who want to compete for the market.
If they just legalized it everywhere, without all the controls, the criminals would evaporate. Or would they.
Alcohol is legal everywhere, the 'fallout' from that is much much worse.

Tell your congressman weed is far less dangerous to the public.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 12:56 PM
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a reply to: feldercarb

I was literally JUST in Colorado like 2 or 3 weeks ago. It isn't some lawless dystopia. In FACT, it's actually quite pleasant and all the people are super nice. Denver is a super safe city.

ETA:

Jeff Hunt is the Vice President of Public Policy at Colorado Christian University. Follow him on Twitter: @jeffhunt.

Ugh... One of those busy body Christians who tell you your business and can't stand people smoking that "Devil's Weed".
edit on 7-8-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 12:56 PM
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a reply to: feldercarb
I think you aught to re-read your post. How can there be higher arrest rates for possession when there should not be a possession crime because it's been legalized?
If they legalized it but then stunted the legal avenues to get marijuana then it's still in the criminals hands to supply hence the low tax revenue.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: crayzeed

Per the article, although unclear; it seems that the rise in arrests were for minors under the age of 18.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:00 PM
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How about the safety issue? Shouldn't you know how strong it is and what is in it?

Wonder who payed for the opinion.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:05 PM
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I got stoned when I used to smoke. I don't think we need a real lot of stoned people in the country, it would be comparable to having drunk workers working on the job. It is psychotropic, it effects our thinking. It may have some medical benefits, I do not discount that. It should be up to the local people in the community if they want to make it completely legal and we need to set parameters for it's use if legalized. People should not be allowed to use it at work.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: feldercarb

Thank you for listing your sources so nicely.

As already stated, this is an editorial without any corroborating data and need to be taken as such. More verifiable information would be needed, IMO, would be needed to support this position if that is your intention.




posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:09 PM
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I think that it should be legal nationally. I don't think that you should drive when you've been smoking.
However, if you want to smoke in your own home I think that it's fine and should not be criminalized.

I think that we should review all drug laws and rather than jailing people we should help people who have dependency issues.

We don't need any more people in jail because they have substance abuse issues



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Just like you can't have a fifth of JD on your lunch hour, you can't have a spliff either.
Common sense rules apply.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:10 PM
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a reply to: feldercarb

Oddly enough they dont seem to be paying alcohol the same attention...I wonder why?

Heres an excellent example of the devastating effects of heightened alcohol consumption amongst all races:
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

It would be ever so lovely if these opinion pieces covered these two items equally.

Oh and I consume alcohol a bit, not weed, but having partaken of both...Id say the herb is the safer of the two.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: waggz

Excellent point seeing as how it is illegal for them just as alcohol



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: feldercarb


In fiscal year 2016, marijuana tax revenue resulted in $156,701,018. The total tax revenue for Colorado was $13,327,123,798, making marijuana only 1.18% of the state's total tax revenue. The cost of marijuana legalization in public awareness campaigns, law enforcement, healthcare treatment, addiction recovery, and preventative work is an unknown cost to date.


I wonder if that's due to it's non existence, or lack of looking due to negligible amount.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:15 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I got stoned when I used to smoke. I don't think we need a real lot of stoned people in the country, it would be comparable to having drunk workers working on the job. It is psychotropic, it effects our thinking. It may have some medical benefits, I do not discount that. It should be up to the local people in the community if they want to make it completely legal and we need to set parameters for it's use if legalized. People should not be allowed to use it at work.

So you think that if weed is available legally then people would suddenly violate all worker intoxication rules and come to work high all the time? What kind of goofy jump in logic is that? Where is your problem with all the people taking medical opiates while on the job?



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: feldercarb

Living here, I can tell you, this is not at all true. Not at least as the person's opinion would have it.

First of all, the legalization does profit the community. I have friends in education here in Colorado that can tell you that. If nothing else, it's the politicians that are keeping it from being completely available as it should to things like education.

Second, to claim that minorities are somehow targeted by this, is a joke. This is not the CIA introducing crack to LA in the 80's, this is something we all have the choice to do or not to do. Should a minority find themselves addicted.... it is because of their choices. Just as it is with alcohol. Or, eating for that matter. Bad choices in life do not equal racism.

Choices land people in trouble. If a minority commits a crime, and was under the influence, then the influence is something they chose to do. Nobody put the THC in their system against that persons will.

It's all about choices. And the notion of not allowing someone the right to choose is not going to make them a better person. It makes them a victim.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:19 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Good point, you don't see anyone at work showing up drunk, just because it's legal...so why would it happen with weed?



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:19 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I got stoned when I used to smoke. I don't think we need a real lot of stoned people in the country, it would be comparable to having drunk workers working on the job. It is psychotropic, it effects our thinking. It may have some medical benefits, I do not discount that. It should be up to the local people in the community if they want to make it completely legal and we need to set parameters for it's use if legalized. People should not be allowed to use it at work.


So you believe the federal government should tell you what you can't do with your body and that your local government should have to jump through hoops to legalize it?

Wouldn't it be more sensible to legalize it federally and let local laws dictate your personal life if they choose to clamp down on personal freedom?



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:20 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: rickymouse
I got stoned when I used to smoke. I don't think we need a real lot of stoned people in the country, it would be comparable to having drunk workers working on the job. It is psychotropic, it effects our thinking. It may have some medical benefits, I do not discount that. It should be up to the local people in the community if they want to make it completely legal and we need to set parameters for it's use if legalized. People should not be allowed to use it at work.

So you think that if weed is available legally then people would suddenly violate all worker intoxication rules and come to work high all the time? What kind of goofy jump in logic is that? Where is your problem with all the people taking medical opiates while on the job?


I am for legalization, but I can tell you here in Chicago I see people smoking weed and driving all the time. Much like I don't want someone driving with a 40oz in their lap, I also don't want them puffing away on a joint either while behind the wheel. People seem to think nothing of it.

I'd rather weed be treated like alcohol, but I also want the same restrictions as well on it.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: feldercarb

I was literally JUST in Colorado like 2 or 3 weeks ago. It isn't some lawless dystopia. In FACT, it's actually quite pleasant and all the people are super nice. Denver is a super safe city.

ETA:

Jeff Hunt is the Vice President of Public Policy at Colorado Christian University. Follow him on Twitter: @jeffhunt.

Ugh... One of those busy body Christians who tell you your business and can't stand people smoking that "Devil's Weed".


Did you go all over Denver, or did you literally JUST stick to the tourist areas...

Every big city (except Chicago probably) has a pleasant and unpleasnt side. Got anything besides your anecdotal visit? otherwise I can offer my experience there while on a job six months ago.
edit on 7-8-2017 by Wardaddy454 because: (no reason given)



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