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White House OPIOID Commission Wants President Trump to Declare a NATIONAL EMERGENCY!.

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posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: carewemust You are very welcome carewemust. I am sorry for your lost. But please spread the word about this problem. Possibly the only way to solve it is within us. Not a CEO or POTUS. But us as a person to another person. Please let's all do our best to help people understand the risks and hazards of using these drugs. Knowladge is power and we have the power.





posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 09:52 PM
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I'd say alcohol abuse/alcoholism is by far a greater "epidemic" (nationally/globally) than opioid abuse.

edit on 6-8-2017 by Kromlech because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 10:01 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
August 6, 2017

A government opioid commission chaired by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has called for President Trump to declare a state of emergency in dealing with the opioid epidemic, which now kills more than 100 Americans daily.




Hmmm...So, 100 Americans die every day from Opioids. I have the solution. Simply "nationalize" 100 undocumented aliens every day, and "replace" the missing Americans with "New Americans" that want to be here.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: neomaximus10
I agree with much of what you say.

If it is a crisis, it is a government created crisis.

They pushed doctors into over prescribing narcotics, setting the patient up for addiction, then they pulled the rug from out beneath their feet, and forced many with chronic pain into the streets.

There is a difference between dependency and addiction. People that suffer with chronic pain are caught in the middle.

There is no reason that the majority of narcotics have to be addictive, outside of the fact that it makes the pharmaceutical companies a crap load of money.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 10:20 PM
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originally posted by: neomaximus10
I also wanted to add that, you could give an addict the world 3 times over, but if he isnt ready himself to quit, then they will keep on doing it.

That is what would make any kind of successful treatment extremely difficult.


I guess Opioids have that in common with alcohol and tobacco. You have to WANT to quit.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 10:27 PM
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originally posted by: Allaroundyou
a reply to: carewemust You are very welcome carewemust. I am sorry for your lost. But please spread the word about this problem. Possibly the only way to solve it is within us. Not a CEO or POTUS. But us as a person to another person. Please let's all do our best to help people understand the risks and hazards of using these drugs. Knowladge is power and we have the power.



You're right, AllAroundYou. Government and Corporations make these drugs available. They put "side effects" notices in the package, but they're usually a thousand words in length. It's ultimately up to each individual to do his/her part to educate and use common sense.

At least if a National Emergency is declared, more people will become aware of these drugs, and maybe question their physician more about their prescriptions.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 10:28 PM
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It's bad up on Maine.
Had a death in extended family just today from an OD. Might have been an accident, might have been intentional to avoid an upcoming extended stay in prison.

My understanding is she turned down a 7 year sentence to fight for less, but was almost guaranteed 50 years.

Either way, her 10 year old child woke up without a mother today. I'm fuzzy on the details, but I'm not assuming there's a father in the picture either.

Meanwhile, there are volunteers handing out supplies for the junkies where she lived.


www.pressherald.com...

www.google.com...

Couldn't do a search on Google about Maine's heroin problem six months ago without seeing articles about the government funded folks distributing clean needles, needle disposal boxes, bandages, and other injection supplies to the huddled masses of addicts around every major city.

Tonight, not a single article seems to be standing.
At least, not on Google. They appear to have stepped up their censorship game, and are hiding this problem among others.


State of emergency won't happen- if our over funded bloated government was doing their job, these drugs wouldn't be available.

I'd bet my wallet that at least one three letter agency was involved in the transport chain of the drugs that killed her.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 10:56 PM
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originally posted by: TDawg61
Most of these deaths are related to Heroin cut with Fentanyl.Definitly not prescribed.


Winner, winner, chicken dinner.

The epidemic begins with developing a physical dependence to legal opioids, spiraling into heroin usage... one 'hot shot' later and you're six feet under. It's very bad. The overdose deaths in 2016 surpassed the highest number of deaths from traffic accidents (1972-3?) and gun-related deaths (1993?). It's an epidemic the Chinese are all too willing to fuel -- the fentanyl and carfentanil are largely produced in Chinese laborities.

There doesn't seem to be an easy answer, but resources -- cost-effective -- should be allocated towards outreach namely, prevention of illicit use of legal opioids.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 11:09 PM
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Let's have a war despite the fact that Opiate use is down from last year.
This has nothing to do with legal prescription drugs.
It's about heroin and Chinese Fentanyl which the gangs and CIA are making a killing with.
Declare war on the CIA if you really want a War on Drugs to go anywhere.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 11:14 PM
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a reply to: BeefNoMeat

Certainly no real easy answer, but cutting supply lines seems fairly simple, right?
If it's coming from China, we simply need to pay more attention to Chinese imports.

Last I checked, our ass backwards policies had us employing nearly twice as many government employees as we had working in production.

Maybe some percentage of those overpaid idiots should be inspecting imports instead of trafficking injection supplies. Stop the source instead of assisting the administration.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 02:03 AM
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They are rapidly loosing the fight against MJ.

They badly need another target otherwise their revenue will be fettered.

OPIOIDS

Drug enforcement for the 21st Century. All hail the Justice System, protecting you by throwing your neighbors in jail.

That is all it is about.

Just a new public enemy for mass consumption.

If this were real, they would be acknowledging that their current war on drugs has only made things worse and perhaps seeking to remedy the cause of drug abuse would be a step in the right direction.

P



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 02:57 AM
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By far it's nothing new, has been for at least a decade maybe more, it's just the Big Pharma profits(as well as faud by Drs.) have poured in for so long, nothing has been done about.

To win the war on opioids, marijuana needs to be non restricted:


A study released in March found that in states that had legalized medical marijuana, hospitals treated far fewer opioid users. Authored by Yuyan Shi, a public health professor at the University of California, San Diego, the study found hospitalization rates for opioid painkiller dependence and abuse dropped on average 23 percent in states where marijuana was available. Hospitalization for opioid overdoses dropped 13 percent.

Another 2014 study at the Montefiore Medical Center in New York City showed a correlation between the legalization of medical marijuana and reduced opioid overdose deaths, down nearly 25 percent, between 1999 and 2010, compared to states where the drug remained banned. Other studies, including one published in June by the Journal of Pain, suggest cannabis can be an effective alternative to prescribing opioids for pain relief. The over-prescribing of opioid drugs, like OxyContin, is regarded as a significant cause of the opioid addiction problem confronting our nation.

Source

edit on 7-8-2017 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 03:44 AM
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originally posted by: MOMof3
These are the same states that voted Trump and republicans to repeal Obamacare. Now they want the Medicaid expansion to take care of their unhappy and hopeless drug addicts. Capitalism on the way up, socialism on the way down.


And ironically, they are the ones who are going to suffer the most under Jeff Sessions reviving his war on drugs. And in effect, the Republicans will end up drastically reducing it's own voter base. Unsurprisingly, places where the opiod crisis is the worst are places that overwhelmingly went for Trump. Since sessions wants to slap felonies and maximums for mere possesion and use, and since these are states that prohibit inmates, and sometimes felons, from voting, he is ultimately making a bunch of their own voter base incapable of voting. The ones that avoid the law will either die from their addiction or lack of care.

They are going to crash their own house of cards because of their shortsighted, idiotic thinking, and frankly, I do not care.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 04:58 AM
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originally posted by: dreamingawake
By far it's nothing new, has been for at least a decade maybe more, it's just the Big Pharma profits(as well as faud by Drs.) have poured in for so long, nothing has been done about.

To win the war on opioids, marijuana needs to be non restricted:


A study released in March found that in states that had legalized medical marijuana, hospitals treated far fewer opioid users. Authored by Yuyan Shi, a public health professor at the University of California, San Diego, the study found hospitalization rates for opioid painkiller dependence and abuse dropped on average 23 percent in states where marijuana was available. Hospitalization for opioid overdoses dropped 13 percent.

Another 2014 study at the Montefiore Medical Center in New York City showed a correlation between the legalization of medical marijuana and reduced opioid overdose deaths, down nearly 25 percent, between 1999 and 2010, compared to states where the drug remained banned. Other studies, including one published in June by the Journal of Pain, suggest cannabis can be an effective alternative to prescribing opioids for pain relief. The over-prescribing of opioid drugs, like OxyContin, is regarded as a significant cause of the opioid addiction problem confronting our nation.

Source


I was just about to comment on this very thing, and the new manufactured "crisis". Thanks for giving me a great start.

This crisis is not new, it has been a long time in coming, and the DEA, for the most part, manufactured it.

It really starts up in it's current incarnation in late 2012, when Washington and Colorado became the first states to legalize marijuana, and several others legalized medicinal use. This of course, was not only a huge blow for Big Pharma and it's pill mills, it was also a blow to the DEA and it's War on Drugs. next year, a couple more states legalized marijuana. That's right about when the DEA decided to start it's war against "pill mills".

I remember this, because I was working as a caregiver in around 2014, and that's when the DEA decided to get involved in doctor/patient affairs, and decide to limit doctor's ability to prescribe pain meds short and long term. Patients who had been on long term pain meds found themselves cut off cold turkey more often than not. So not only are they now in pain, they are also dealing with heavy withdrawals. So of course they are going to take matters into their own hands.

I actually predicted this very thing happening when the DEA started its war on pills. The medical industry created millions of addicts, then cut them off cold turkey. They are now junkies in pain, going through withdrawals like crazy. They gotta get their fix from somewhere, and the streets are always there to oblige, with pills and smack. So of course there is going to be an epidemic, and this time, it's no longer confined to crappy urban hellholes. Now the DEA has reason to keep it's inflated budget and failing war on drugs going, and the money they will make from property seizures, along with the increase in private prisons, is going to make some people a lot of money, but it ain't you and me.

But on to the bright point, the fact that states with legalized marijuana saw a drop not only in pain pill overdoses, but prescriptions in general. This is true here in Washington State, normally, the notorious Heroin capital of the West Coast. Seattle has always been a junkie's paradise. Yet the epidemic hasn't really took hold beyond normal levels here. The biggest reason is because a better alternative exists: cannabis. I know personally two examples illustrating this.

One was a client of mine when I was caregiving. She had been on heavy-duty painkillers for years. Methadone, Oxy, ect, due to severe nerve and bone damage in her neck and spine from a car wreck. When the news regs took effect, her doctor had to refer her to a "pain clinic" which I suspected was heavily connected to the DEA )long story). They cut her off cold turkey and sent her away. However, she had started trying marijuana for her pain and illness, and not only did she prefer it, she did not care that her pain meds were cut off. In fact, her overall physical and mental health improved after a few months on the marijuana, and she was able to get off a few other meds. Instead of pills, she now takes tincturess and makes cannabis cookies. And is now able to function without help.

The other case is a buddy of mine, a war vet. Had his lower leg smashed up from an armored humvee door in Iraq after it was hit with an IED. with a couple pieces if shrapnel. The VA had him on Oxy-Contin for a couple years, then decided he didn't need it anymore, and stopped giving it to him. So, this being Seattle, he had little problem finding a street "substitute" and for a while, was a homeless junkie. Long story short, he found the right people, got a place to live, got himself into school. But he not only got off the smack with the help of cannabis, he found it made his PTSD manageable.

Of course, in places where it is still illegal and still highly criminalized, people don't have many options, so the black market steps in.

And the DEA gets a boost of life into their dying war on drugs.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 07:21 AM
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I'm glad to see the US is treating this drug epidemic as a medical crisis and exploring humane and sensible solutions to help affected addicts instead of waging a war and treating and sentencing the victims on the same plateau as serial killers. ... I wonder what's different this time around.

no idea...



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 07:42 AM
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It certainly seems like an emergency situation here in Cincinnati.....

I just can't get over it no matter how many times its spoken of or brought up.......

I never knew what Heroin effing was even. By 2009 my senior year in highschool, I started to become familiar with the name, and what the effects on the users were, or at least, the wanted effects.

Then, in 2012 we started saying goodbye to our friends. Touching their cold hands one last time before they were driven to their grave sites and lowered into the ground. It's 2017 and I've seen buried more friends than I care to believe. I...... It makes me angry on one hand It's like how could I have associated with people like that..... but they weren't like that. They were never like "that" until they had been on Heroin.

Now to be honest I feel like I'm waiting on a family member who damn near may as well have been my older brother for all I care, he was like that to me.... Until the heroin... I'm waiting for him to die. Help has been offered, multiple life savings have been drained....... Hes still sick.

I spend a lot of time wandering why..... why them and not me? I have an addictive personality, I am addicted to nicotine, I liked to get high when I was high-school, what prevented me from choosing to do Heroin, that didn't stop my friends? What can I do? Can I do anything besides wait to say my goodbyes to them?

Hell I remember the first time my girlfriends called and said come on down we are smoking some Opium, it's amazing! I asked what in the hell that was, and they said oh it's even better than Mary Jane come on! For some reason I just thought that was too much, I was good with what I knew and told them no thanks, well for them it escalated from there to Heroin for one of them and shes still struggling to fight her addiction every day.

It's like watching someone slowly starve to death with a banquet in front of them that they can't stop eating.
You literally watch them deteriorate mentally, physically, and then they die. It's a slow process, it takes others lives and life savings with it, except usually they don't die, they are left to live with the hole that's been created.

It drives me nuts. Someone smarter than I has got to come up with something.

-Alee
edit on 8/7/2017 by NerdGoddess because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: NerdGoddess

I can tell you, at least in my experience, what is happening.

A lot of recent research seems to show that one of the biggest factors in determining drug addiction is previously existing severe mental disorders, or a very high pre-disposition to them. Drug addiction is a very complicated, multi-dimensional problem, but in the vast majority of cases, most addicts weren't right in the head to begin with. Drug addiction, just as often as it is used as a way to escape life, is often a means for people to self medicate and function. As a dude I knew in high school told me after I asked him why he did so many drugs, he stated it wasn't to get high, but feel "normal". For the most part, he was right. When he was "high", you could actually carry on a relatively coherent conversation with him, and he was somewhat mellow. When not high, however, he was bouncing his head against trees, rambling on about nonsense. Probably schitzo or something. Untreated, his family was abusive.

Of course, people with mental illness can live lives and never be tempted to use anything stronger than aspirin. There are many other factors, personal, biological, and social, that also contribute to a person becoming an addict.

Self destruction is the addict's end game, more than anything else. Addiction is slow, purposeful suicide. Almost every addict knows, no matter what he tells other people, that death awaits them. Many deep down crave that. A lot of addicts hate themselves, and they take that hate out on themselves via slow suicide, and anyone unlucky enough to be in the blast zone.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: NerdGoddess

They say if you find yourself in a hole, stop digging. That is not an option when you find yourself in a hole that is being dug by someone else.

Unfortunately addicts dig holes so big that they will consume and eventually bury everyone that is around them. Your starving person at a banquet is a perfect analogy. They can't stop eating and they can't stop digging their own grave.

In my experience with addicts, you can't force treatment on them, it is a waste of time and money. The only way out of that pit is they have to stop digging and pull themselves out. They have to "want" to stop.

The people that love them make a huge mistake when they think they have the power to make them stop. They don't. They can't shame them into stopping, that can't plead them into stopping, or even love them into stopping. The only way that grave they are digging will be put on hold, is when they want to stop more than they want to take that drug that is driving them.

You ask yourself why it didn't happen to you. Probably because you have a different chemical make-up. I have seen people become addicted to Dilaudid after receiving only three doses of the medication. That is one of the reasons I refused it after my surgery.

I have seen people with chronic pain on Morphine, Fentanyl patches and Oxycodone just stop taking it all, because they were fed up and frustrated with trying to outrun the pain, and having to deal with the humiliation associated with getting the medication refills.

I wouldn't recommend the cold turkey route for anyone, but the people I know that did it, was at the end of their rope and didn't care at the time if they lived or died. They lived, and they say that the pain of the hell they were in before was worse, and that it could not be called living when your life revolves around getting your next dose of the drug.

I honestly believe that people that take the medications to combat physical pain, have the ability to walk away from the drugs easier than people that take the drugs just to get high. I don't think people that need the medications to combat pain, develop a true addiction though they may become dependent on the drug, I think an addiction develops when the drug is being taking to elicit a change in mood or state of mind.

I think that is why the brain reacts differently to the two situations, and why it has a huge impact on whether a person becomes addicted or not.

This is my personal based on my experiences after over 40 years in the medical field.

edit on 7-8-2017 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: Foggy head today.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

I'm going to say no to this only because declaring a state of emergency leads to fear. Fear leads to government crackdowns. Government crackdowns lead to prison sentences for people suffering from a disease. Keep in mind that Sessions is still the AG and he is VERY pro-drug war.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 09:41 AM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn
I honestly believe that people that take the medications to combat physical pain, have the ability to walk away from the drugs easier than people that take the drugs just to get high. I don't think people that need the medications to combat pain, develop a true addiction though they may become dependent on the drug, I think an addiction develops when the drug is being taking to elicit a change in mood or state of mind.

I think that is why the brain reacts differently to the two situations, and why it has a huge impact on whether a person becomes addicted or not.

There is literally zero difference in addiction rates of prescribed versus taking it for fun. For one, opiates don't treat pain. They just numb the sensation. So there is no way for your brain to tell the difference.

The only reason a person prescribed opiates wouldn't become addicted is if they take the prescribed dosage. But if they feel like it isn't working well anymore and start upping the dosage on their own (which happens a lot because tolerance sucks) then addiction starts to set in.

Many times people who were prescribed pain pills will get cut off and then switch to heroin. It's not a good situation and doctors really should be thinking twice about prescribing this stuff. They should give out medical cannabis instead.
edit on 7-8-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



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