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Another US Marines aircraft down

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posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 06:45 AM
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www.foxnews.com...


Fox news are reporting a US marines Osprey has crashed off the coast of Australia. No news yet of the crew. Here's hoping everyone onboard made it out safely. A search and rescue is underway.




posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 06:53 AM
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Do we need to ask which coast?



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 06:55 AM
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These *snip* designed aircraft keep falling out of the sky.

They need to ground them permanently.

Prayers and thoughts for the service members involved and the others that will inevitably be injured or killed by this dump truck.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 07:07 AM
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a reply to: EternalShadow

Almost all of the Osprey accidents that have happened recently, and there haven't been many, have been pilot error. It has proven itself to be quite useful and versatile.
edit on 8/5/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: Cauliflower
Good question, we have something like 36,000km of coastline.
It looks like it crashed off the coastline of Queensland near the big Shoalwater Bay training centre. Exercise Talisman Sabre has just concluded up there.
Daily Telegraph story



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 07:21 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: EternalShadow

Almost all of the Osprey accidents that have happened recently, and there haven't been many, have been pilot error. It has proven itself to be quite useful and versatile.


Thanks for the heads up. I just remember when the Osprey was in its experimental stage it was kind of a beast. It is good to know that it is a decent plane.


Just seen they found 23 of the troops and that 3 are missing.
edit on 5-8-2017 by Tarzan the apeman. because: Because they let me.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 07:49 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


It has proven itself to be quite useful and versatile.


No it hasn't.

Reminder that the V22 is a piece of junk...



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Ah yes, if the tabloid of defense journalism says so it must be true!



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: Tarzan the apeman.

After the crash that killed 19 people they sat down and almost completely redid the software and some of the airframe systems. They informally called it Osprey 2.0.

From 1991-2000 there were four crashes that killed 30 people. After the redesign, there wasn't another crash until 2010 in Afghanistan, and counting this one, there have been something like six crashes since 2000.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:25 AM
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originally posted by: C0bzz
a reply to: intrptr

Ah yes, if the tabloid of defense journalism says so it must be true!


The detractors didn't write the article, just reported on obvious shortcomings.

I'll add one, too. The tilt rotor design hasn't 'caught on' world wide , the Osprey is the only example. Think other nations know something we don't (wink wink)?



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:40 AM
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Unconfirmed reports put it at two dead, three missing, and several injuries.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: nelloh62

That is sad.



Just a question, why so many mil bases in a Allies country?



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:51 AM
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Until it becomes clear what operational procedure the aircraft was undertaking at the time of the occurrence, it shows that the mishap took place during Tilt, there may be some sort of fleet wide consequences.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 09:15 AM
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edition.cnn.com...

The aircraft involved in the accident launched from the USS Bonhomme Richard ( LHD6 ) according to CNN. Thoughts and prayers go out to the families of all involved. Australian Authorities are saying the incident happened in Shoalwater Bay, and no Australian personnel were on board. As usual, Zaph seems to have his finger on the pulse and always gives out good information. I don't think there is much to gain in us guessing why it went down, we may as well wait for the official statement.


originally posted by: thebozeian
a reply to: Cauliflower
Good question, we have something like 36,000km of coastline.
It looks like it crashed off the coastline of Queensland near the big Shoalwater Bay training centre. Exercise Talisman Sabre has just concluded up there.
Daily Telegraph story



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

They were apparently attempting to land on the Reagan at the time of the accident.
edit on 8/5/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 09:38 AM
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Anyone know what the weather was like at the time of the incident? I did google it, but I am getting conflicting reports ranging from mild weather to severe weather. Just wondering if weather was hampering with SAR



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: nelloh62

They haven't mentioned weather, so that may mean it's not too bad.

The aircraft was from VMM-265, with the 31st MEU.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 09:54 AM
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Phenominally awesome photos from exercise Talisman Sabre from the official Instagram account here and Facebook page. Obviously to an extent it's propaganda, but good photos.

a reply to: seasonal

That picture is bizarre. The majority of the bases are not US military but Australian. NASA is not military. Because Australia is allied with the US, the author considers all of them US military bases. Australia is also an allied country with a unique geographical position, so for logistical reasons it makes a lot of sense for them to use our bases.

The only major bases that are US would be Pine Gap (communications) and North West Cape (iirc, mothballed). There are also US Marines at Australian bases in Darwin. US may also joint use some other facilities, but they are not "US Military Facilities".

Let me give you several examples:

Warramunga Seismic Station at Tennant Creek is operated by Australian National University. It is part of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (detecting nuclear explosions) therefore it is considered a "US Military Facility" by the author of the image.

Intelligence between the US and Australia is often shared, therefore any Australian intelligence facility is considered a "US Military Facility".

Also counted in the above image are RAAF bare bases, which are air force bases that can be fitted out for operations but are not typically used (and certainly not used by the US). "US Military Facilities".

Air Warfare Destroyers refers to a class of ship. Hobart Class. They are made in Australia, based off a Spanish design, although the combat systems tend to be american. It would be like looking at a map of the US, finding where US Navy bases are, then claiming they are "Australian Military Bases" because US ships contain Australian components. All Aegis cruisers and destroyers have Australian missile defense systems (Nulka).
edit on 5/8/17 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/8/17 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: seasonal

many reasons. The Aussies and US get along quite well(at least from my time spent there) Its in the southern hemisphere, and a good jumping off point for islands and asia.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

What's your personal take on the Osprey Zaph. Have you ever had the chance to chat to the pilots and what they think of it ?
I must admit, I would be nervous flying in one of them.




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