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Is it Likely That There Are Many Life-Forms Living In Space Between The Stars?.

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posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 07:17 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: lostbook
a reply to: carewemust

Of course there must be some life forms floating around the oceans of space. You could even look at the planets themselves... they are lifeforms..


How do you come to that conclusion?


Planets have the same processes as humans. They move around, breath, consume, eliminate waste, have blood, etc.

How could you get living things (nature) from something that isn't alive? Living babies come from living Mothers, right?




posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

Yeah NASA has the whole thing backwards.

Confused about how Earth ocean creatures got into space, like that's logical.

They're all over space and filter down to Earth and other planets is what makes sense here.

But of course they can't ever admit to that.



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 10:10 AM
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a reply to: Urantia1111


Why do you think NASA can't do that? And how do you know "They're all over space?"



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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Space Sharks



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: selfharmonise
It is beautiful to think that our seas may be seeding life across space.


a reply to: carewemust



Any idea how Plankton get attached to the ISS?


Sharknado?



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 10:43 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: lostbook
a reply to: carewemust

Of course there must be some life forms floating around the oceans of space. You could even look at the planets themselves... they are lifeforms..


How do you come to that conclusion?


Planets have the same processes as humans. They move around, breath, consume, eliminate waste, have blood, etc.

How could you get living things (nature) from something that isn't alive? Living babies come from living Mothers, right?


I see your point. We might as well just say that the UNIVERSE itself is life..is alive. Cool!



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: Urantia1111


I think the number and variation of life forms in the universe will prove to be far more exciting than the planets we'll one day explore. After a few dozen Earth-like planets, balls of rocks, methane, and the like...that aspect of space exploration could become quite routine/boring.

Unfortunately, every one of us will be long gone before humanity reaches that point...if we ever survive to reach it.



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 11:00 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: carewemust

In an infinite space, there are infinite possibilities..


How true! Ranging from beautiful, to deadly.



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767


Great post, LabTech767. You have a very open and intelligent mind! Thank-you for that food for thought.



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13


That star-like blob captured by the Space Shuttle video camera is what got me to thinking back then, that life exists in the vacuum of space.

Also, when I read posts from members who have related the behavior of "Orbs" they've seen in the air, makes me believe that they may be living things that mankind has yet to catalog.

There are also a few threads in the forum with videos of shape-shifting white blobs flying through the sky. Again, another uncategorized life form, possibly.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 07:58 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

Come up with a theory how they live, until then you will have to accept people saying it's not possible.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:18 AM
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As with the water bears surviving space for extended periods of time, it appears the sugar molecule 'trehalose' (a white, crystalline disaccharide, C12H22O11, occurring in yeast, certain fungi, etc., and used to identify certain bacteria) is replaced in some cells thereby conserving water and/or constraining water molecules to prevent contraction/expansion of tissue. This should be looked at for human suspension for long space flights.

So, the scientists may want to look at the 'trehalose' levels on the living organisms present there now.




In its desiccated state, the tardigrade is ridiculously, almost absurdly resilient. Laboratory tests have shown that tardigrades can endure both an utter vacuum and intense pressures more than five times as punishing as those in the deepest ocean. Even temperatures up to 300 degrees Fahrenheit and as low as -458 degrees F (just above absolute zero) won't spell the creature's doom. But the exact source of its resilience is a mystery, says Emma Perry, a leading tardigrade researcher at Unity College in Maine. "In general, we know very little about how this species functions, especially when we're talking about the molecular level." There are clues. Scientists have learned that when the tardigrade enters its desiccated state, "it replaces some of its cell contents with a sugar molecule called trehalose," Perry says. Researchers believe this trehalose molecule not only replaces water, but also in some cases can physically constrain the critter's remaining water molecules, keeping them from rapidly expanding when faced with hot and cold temperatures. This is important, because expanding water molecules (like what happens when you get frostbite) can mean instant cellular death for most animals.


www.popularmechanics.com...



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:39 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

I do not know about the void of space but in a nebula all the ingredients are certainly there... My bet would be their are countless planets where there were once sentient beings who decided to stay on their egg of a planet for whatever reason and are now extinct... All planets are nothing but eggs... Hatch and go forth, or sit and become extinct...just my opinion...



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:45 AM
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originally posted by: 727Sky
a reply to: carewemust
All planets are nothing but eggs... Hatch and go forth, or sit and become extinct...just my opinion...


logical perceptions.
Add in the energies present within the concentrated dark energy-matter voids and that can be more potential for Creation...



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 08:54 AM
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It's seems after an intelligent evaluation of a habitat/planet and potential threats to civilization from space is made some species would come to logical conclusions that to remain stationary primarily on world and not work towards going cosmic bound in mass may be illogical. When considering the preservation of the species and avoiding possible natural or unnatural cosmic related events.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 02:33 AM
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Space between stars is really, really empty. There's nothing there apart from some extremely rarefied hydrogen and other gasses (but still a better vacuum than we can create in vacuum chambers on Earth), and some microscopic mineral particles ejected by dying stars.

Density of "stuff" in the interstellar medium ranges from one million particles per 1 cubic centimeter, to one particle per 10 cubic meters... too low to even enterntain the idea of something complex like an organism forming. For comparison, high-vacuum laboratory chambers we use on Earth can only achieve 10 billion molecules per cubic centimeter.

Rather, the microscopic particles that do float there can form slightly more complex molecules (including even alcohols) and eventually become part of a new star system forming, together with its own planets. That's where the interstellar chemistry can aid the appearance of life on one of these planets.

To recap, life still needs to be close to a star in order to appear and have a chance to evolve. The best you could hope to "catch" in the interstellar medium is some microbial spores or dehydrated husks of very small multicellar organisms like the tardigrades.
edit on 7-8-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 02:45 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

How about a Rouge Planet? Being sustained by internal heating, under ground ocean, radioactive decay, and geyser out gassing?

Collides something during its wandering and a chunk of a rock gets blasted off it with a hardy species like a tardigrade to maybe wander throw intersteller space until it find a newly formed system....



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