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SCI/TECH: Other Planets In Galaxy May Have Layer Of Diamonds

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posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 09:33 AM
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Unlike planets in our solar system, scientists have theorized that carbon planets located near the center of the galaxy may have diamond layers many miles thick. It is believed that these planets' atmospheric gas, which contains high amounts of carbon and/or very little oxygen, will yield carbon compounds which would be turned into diamonds under the high pressure found on carbon planets. None of these planets exist in our solar system.
 



story.news.yahoo.com
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Some planets in our galaxy could harbor an unexpected treasure: a thick layer of diamonds hiding under the surface, astronomers reported on Monday.

No diamond planet exists in our solar system, but some planets orbiting other stars in the Milky Way might have enough carbon to produce a diamond layer, Princeton University astronomer Marc Kuchner said in a telephone news conference.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Diamond layers several miles thick? I find it fascinating how varied the different planets are, and even more fascinating that scientists are able to discern the makeup of planets many light years away. Now assuming that this is true, and there are layers of diamonds, would man ever consider harvesting them if travel over that great a distance ever became possible?

If so, I would hope that my wife never finds out!


[edit on 8-2-2005 by Banshee]




posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 11:20 AM
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Wow, now here's a question. As I understand it, diamonds are one of the hardest substances on the earth. If there were layers "miles thick" of diamonds, would the surface of the planet be virtually impregnable? If an asteroid hit it, would it be smashed to bits?



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 11:33 AM
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This is just another example of how spectacular this universe is. There is so much out there that is still undiscovered. I'm still looking for a planet made out of cheese :-)



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 11:37 AM
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I'm still looking for a planet made out of cheese :-)


Yes, and we will call this cheese planet "Chirac".


Seriously think about it, if the layer is miles thick - How big could some of these diamonds be? Are they like gigantic glaciers of diamond? Or zillions of small ones?



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 12:18 PM
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Superdude
Diamond is scratch resistant and maintains a very sharp edge, but is quite weak against shattering forces, no match for an asteroid travelling at ridiculous speeds.

What about neutron stars, they're really just enormous diamonds spinning at incredible speeds.

Some day I want to start a private company whose mission statement is interstellar mining operations, asteroid, comet, planets, stars, whatever. There are practically limitless natural resources just floating around out there. I'd have a pumping station on Titan, a refinery on mars, a ship packing a rail gun hacking apart diamonds to use in industrial lasers, gas eating robotic ships to suck up and condense hydrogen for energy production, and of course thousands of tiny eye bots scouring the universe for new prospects. Seriously, who else wants in, I could take on partners as long as they're willing to bear the financial burden.



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 12:27 PM
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Diamond is scratch resistant and maintains a very sharp edge, but is quite weak against shattering forces, no match for an asteroid travelling at ridiculous speeds.


I would have to think that you would be right, however I'd never contemplated a layer miles thick before.



What about neutron stars, they're really just enormous diamonds spinning at incredible speeds.


Hmm - I wasn't aware of that actually. I was under the impression that Neutron stars are about 20 km in diameter and have the mass of about 1.4 times that of our Sun. This means that a neutron star is so dense that on Earth, one teaspoonful would weigh a billion tons! Because of its small size and high density, a neutron star possesses a surface gravitational field about 300,000 times that of Earth.

imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov...

I'll have to do some more research about the diamond make up of Neutron stars.



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 12:32 PM
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You're right, I was wrong. I was thinking of a White Dwarf. Sorry, sorry. Mea culpa..

As far as a surface miles thick..doesn't dense material transmit shock better?



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 12:35 PM
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I hope that one acre of land I bought on the moon for $20 has diamonds. I'll be rich, wait, no I won't because other people bought acres on the moon. Bleep--Bleep--Bleep!



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 12:40 PM
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I hope that one acre of land I bought on the moon for $20 has diamonds. I'll be rich, wait, no I won't because other people bought acres on the moon. Bleep--Bleep--Bleep!


Hey I paid $29 for my acre - you're already making money!



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by superdude
....Now assuming that this is true, and there are layers of diamonds, would man ever consider harvesting them if travel over that great a distance ever became possible?
[edit on 8-2-2005 by Banshee]


Well, if diamonds are as important to other beings as they are to mankind, then I'm sure the harvesting has already started.

Peace



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 12:53 PM
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As far as a surface miles thick..doesn't dense material transmit shock better?


I can't say I know the answer to that one. A lead bar is pretty dense, yet it seems to absorb shock pretty well. Maybe it's rigidity moreso than density?
Good question!



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 02:45 PM
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the "downside" is, the more of any formerly-rare material we can access, the less valuable it becomes. If there is some sort of use that massively increases demand, and consumes this material, then it becomes worthwhile to go to great lengths to get it. Oil, for example, wouldn't be worth squat if it wasn't consumed. Diamond only maintains it's value because of it's enforced rarity (deBeers, anyone?)

I think this is part of the reason why no lunar mining is seriously considered. Sure there's easily acessable minerals that are rare down the gravity well-but once you get to them and start bringing them back, their value decreases. No massively obscene profit margin, hence no serious corporate interest.



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 03:10 PM
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Well of course diamonds aren't worth what they're charging, nothing is, really. Except maybe the 1 dollar cheesburgers at my neighborhood gas station. Diamonds are still incredibly useful for industrial applications.



posted on Feb, 8 2005 @ 03:20 PM
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Well of course diamonds aren't worth what they're charging, nothing is, really. Except maybe the 1 dollar cheesburgers at my neighborhood gas station. Diamonds are still incredibly useful for industrial applications.



Mmmmmmmmmm cheeeesebuuurger......... Yes, diamond are extremely useful, no doubt, but I would have to agree with Phugedaboudet
in the sense that there simply wouldn't be enough profit. Unless a technology comes along that just "beams up" the cargo, then I doubt that it would ever happen. I would like to see a "space diamond" though.




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