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Words can now kill

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posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:53 PM
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I think it's misplaced to compare this to a one off "Go kill yourself" or "jump off a bridge" comment. This woman took someone with serious mental issues who trusted her and repeatedly played mind games with him, intending to goad him into killing himself. The degree of maliciousness and recklessness involved warranted the charges and the conviction warrants a prison sentence, in my opinion.

I see very little difference between this and, for example, Charles Manson being in prison. Manson killed nobody. He has spent the last 46 years in prison because mentally and emotionally manipulated 4 people into committing a horrific act of brutality. He didn't "just" go to prison for conspiracy to commit murder, he's behind bars for straight up murder convictions. While we can justifiably argue the difference between murdering someone and committing suicide, I don't know too many folks who would argue that Charles Manson doesn't belong in prison nor that the world would be safer with him freed. Same can be said here, in my opinion.



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posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:55 PM
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"Involuntary Manslaughter

1) An unlawful killing that was unintentionally caused as the result of the defendants' wanton or reckless conduct;"

That is the definition under Massachusetts law.

I'd say the conduct by her was "wanton and reckless". This was not just someone trolling a stranger online; this was someone knowingly encouraging someone she knew was at risk to kill themselves.

I view this a lot like the Good Samaritan laws that some area's have. You drive by a stranded person in the middle of nowhere when it's -30 degrees out and no other help in sight, you know they will die and have therefore just killed them by having "wanton disregard" for their situation. That deserves punishment the same as this in this case.

Both inaction and words can and do cause deaths.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:56 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

I thought about Manson also.

It's difficult. There are comparisons.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:56 PM
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I'm kind of divided. If the b$/^ is so reprehensible, drag her off and dungeon her. I mean yes it calls in the brain for justice, and everything in your mind makes you want to slap her. In any other culture but this one we'd all have a go.

But that's then, now we have a little "debate world." Things take forever, everyone has their damn say, and everyone's there to make sure things are done "equally." Think of how many girls off themselves because some guy said now get out.

If they would have just dragged her off maybe we wouldn't be hearing of such a thing..



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:56 PM
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Say we have a husband, who has had a history of depression and talks of killing himself, and he tells his wife that he wants to kill himself one day. His wife, who has become frustrated with her husband's mental state and talk of suicide, lashes out and says something like "go ahead and kill yourself I dont care, and you dont have the balls anyways"

Husband leaves and jumps off a bridge. The neighbor hears the argument and reported it to the police the wife told him to go kill himself, after finding out about the man's death. Based off the current case and the precedent it sets, would you say the wife be guilty for her words based off her knowledge of her husband's mental state?


edit on pm88201717America/Chicago03p07pm by annoyedpharmacist because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
If I write post after post about how terrible Trump is, and someone tries to kill him based on what I wrote, am I guilty of assassination also?


Incorrect association.

If you constantly encourage them to kill Trump, and they do, then....

That is the premise of your OP.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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Should Jim Jones (Jones town) or Marshall Applewhite (Heaven's Gate) have been held responsible for the deaths they encouraged?



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:58 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

"The pen is mightier than the sword."

Should someone be charged with a crime for writing or saying something?

Good question. I would say it would have some depends.

Let us look at it another way: Let's say she had a weapon like a knife.

Now....just having the knife doesn't really mean anything.

But what if she brandishes the knife and threatens to hurt or kill someone?

In many places that can get you arrested and charged with a crime.

And of course if she actually used the knife on someone, we know that's pretty much a criminal act (with the exception of self defense).

Yah, but words are not weapons right?

I think this is where the depends come in:

1) a young woman makes the claim that someone raped her.......but lied about it. What happens to the guy who was accused?

2) Go online and type or say that you're going to kill POTUS........I'm pretty sure the SS is going to show up on your door step.

3) Think of someone who is very open to suggestion or quite gullible, who has someone making suggestions to them that could get them hurt or in trouble. This is pretty much an every day thing.

4) Think of the billions of dollars spent in PR for products, services, hell propaganda. All words and images.

5) Scream "FIRE" in a crowded theater.

6) Yell "GUN" while around cops.

This list could go on and on.

Words.....images......communication can be a very powerful thing. Why do you think the first amendment is so important?

Should someone be charged in a death for speaking words?

Well.....I believe yes....with a caveat: Bullying.

I believe it's quite possible for one person to abuse another with bullying and quite possibly make a person take their own life because of it.

Look up the statistics of teens and kids that have done exactly that.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555


1) An unlawful killing that was unintentionally caused as the result of the defendants' wanton or reckless conduct;"

That is the definition under Massachusetts law.

I'd say the conduct by her was "wanton and reckless"1) An unlawful killing that was unintentionally caused as the result of the defendants' wanton or reckless conduct;"

That is the definition under Massachusetts law.

I'd say the conduct by her was "wanton and reckless"


I'd agree.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: annoyedpharmacist

I don't think any "precedent" was set by this that did not already exist. The definition of what she was found guilty of is pretty clear.

What you suggest is quite different than encouraging someone who is already in the act of trying to kill themselves, to finish it.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Only if that person explicitly says they want to kill themselves, no?
I don't think saying it once to a stranger who could be playing deserves jail time, but if you know someone and they repetitively tell you to do it, I think it is another matter entirely.

The boy was sick, and she abused her free speech, and I'm all for free speech. But I learned not all things are good to say at anytime. Her actions, because speaking or texting, is an action, lead to the death of someone that was vulnerable.

Aren't we an evolved society who is supposed to protect the weak?



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:00 PM
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I agree. If someone exploits mental problems to talk someone into suicide, it should be considered manslaughter (or whatever the correct english term is).

It´s far different if someone looses their # (like I, minutes before) and says something they probably will regret (for other reasons) or if the one actively pursues someone to end his life.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:04 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

It comes down to each case individually. In some instances, yes, she should have been charged with reckless disregard, or however it's phrased...In other instances, maybe not.

This is the grayest of areas. ...and every time I think to opine, my opinion changes.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:04 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

What constitutes "at risk to kill themselves?"

A formal diagnosis might qualify. Was there one?

Sometimes, people say they're going to commit suicide just to get attention.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: annoyedpharmacist

I don't think any "precedent" was set by this that did not already exist. The definition of what she was found guilty of is pretty clear.

What you suggest is quite different than encouraging someone who is already in the act of trying to kill themselves, to finish it.


Ok, so if the wife saw him, say with a gun to his head, didnt think he would do it, and said "go ahead, kill yourself". Then similar charges?



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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Op makes a good point.

Free Charlie Manson!



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: annoyedpharmacist

You can hypothetical your way into turning even the most logical law into a tool of dangerous precedent, though. This was certainly not a situation like you just described.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:07 PM
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a reply to: NowanKenubi

The guy killed himself because "a woman made him." I'm struggling to find something to protect. It's not like a case where a woman pursues a guy, wrecks his life, calls up making demands at all hours of the morning...whatever else..

Bro offed himself because a girl said "do it." Who is vulnerable enough that that goes on???



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:08 PM
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I think everyone has brought up some great points.

It's enough to give me pause.




posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: Anathros

People have been sent to prison for saying they deny the Holocaust's reality...

Or there is this case of a man going to prison for telling his neighbours their right. I think this is an abuse from the government.

Sentenced to prison

In both cases, no one was hurt which is different with the girl and the boy case.



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