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Meet Palantir, the modern Minority Report

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posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: TacSite18

Yes, I'm aware of this. I have had my hands in a few predictive analytics from time to time. What concerns me is not the use of a predictive system or a Material Requirements Planning type scenario, it's good business sense....In Law Enforcement though? I draw the line there.




posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: alphabetaone
a reply to: TacSite18

Yes, I'm aware of this. I have had my hands in a few predictive analytics from time to time. What concerns me is not the use of a predictive system or a Material Requirements Planning type scenario, it's good business sense....In Law Enforcement though? I draw the line there.



Yes, it is troubling. However, I don't think that our current laws will allow for any convictions on what an AI system thinks you might do, based upon a probability. You might get harassed. You might get surveilled, and get caught doing something else that is unrelated. Got to keep an eye on this.

However, these systems have been by local police to spot crime trends, that allow the scheduling of patrols at times and places that are most likely to have certain crimes committed, with some success. But even in this instance, some have complained that the cops use the system to track low-income areas, and certain crimes (violence, drugs, weapons, prostitution, etc), and would never think of using them to target white collar crimes.

Worth watching.

ETA:

I am encouraged that these are very complex systems, and that to bring them to market requires a different approach to development, that, from personal experience, I believe is beyond the current capability of the Federal government. The feds can do some things very well when it comes to IT (look at SSA's ability to manage an immense amount of data over time). But they are too cautious, too bound to the yearly budget process, and too inflexable to allow for the research and "blind alleys" that must be persued to make much progress.
edit on 3-8-2017 by TacSite18 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2017 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: alphabetaone
a reply to: TacSite18

Yes, I'm aware of this. I have had my hands in a few predictive analytics from time to time. What concerns me is not the use of a predictive system or a Material Requirements Planning type scenario, it's good business sense....In Law Enforcement though? I draw the line there.



I see a lot of benefits from predictive analysis, at the same time when it comes to law enforcement I see a lot of issues. We can skip the obvious precrime scenarios. What about borderline cases if more criminals need to be found? My concern is that this type of system will teach the police how to encourage and entrap people just to improve numbers, in effect increasing crime over time rather than helping to prevent it.



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