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Asian Coin what does it say?

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posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 03:53 AM
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I have this coin I use as chain pendant but got no clue what it says or what it's purpose is. If someone here knows it would be much appreciated.



Is it "ghost money" or just good wishes?




posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 04:24 AM
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iching



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 04:35 AM
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a reply to: abe froman

Funny because to me "iching" sounds as if it could be a Japanese word.


Sorry Chinese
I Ching

edit on 2-8-2017 by Peeple because: Add



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 04:56 AM
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originally posted by: abe froman
iching


Kerching! (sound of crash legister).



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 09:07 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: abe froman
iching


Kerching! (sound of crash legister).


Or could be just ching-ching!



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

This is a cool site in order to help you identify Asian coins : LINK

The coin you pictured look like a "Ch'ien Lung" coin. You need to compare the symbols in detail in order to identify it.



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 09:37 AM
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Someone oughta fix that hole!



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: theultimatebelgianjoke

I believe it is a tibetian prayer coin.
If you image search that.
But what does it say?



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 09:45 AM
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primaltrek.com...

same?


One of the most common inscriptions found on Chinese Buddhist temple coins is "a mi tuo fo" (阿弥陀佛). "A mi tuo fo", sometimes pronounced "e mi tuo fo", is the Chinese pronunciation for the Sanskrit name of the Amitābha Buddha (Amida Buddha). The "a mi tuo" is the transliteration of the Sanskrit word "Amida" which means "boundless" (wuliang 无量). "Fo" is the Chinese word for "Buddha".

edit on 2-8-2017 by Lysergic because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-8-2017 by Lysergic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: Lysergic

No, sadly not. Probably says "tomato soup"...

Would have been really cool.
edit on 2-8-2017 by Peeple because: Add



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

You need to have a closer at the Chinese symbols on it.
Yours look like a Ch'ien Lung Tung Pao, pictured here.

Old coins are often transformed into charms.



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: theultimatebelgianjoke

Just money then. As you see I could need a lesson, you are well reversed, please tell me more.
What's the story with money turning into charms? How? Why?



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

I'm not an asian numismatic specialist you know ... far from that.
Here is another interesting link (from the same site that Lysergic suggested) : Chinese Charms



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 10:15 AM
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a reply to: theultimatebelgianjoke

It means this?


Kneel for money?



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

Where did you got this coin from ?
Did you find it with a metal detector ? Got it from a family member, buy it because it was cool at a pawn shop ...

There are questions about how such an old chinese coin may have ended up in the US (assuming you are in the USA). This particular coin value is not excessive in specialised sites if you look (around 10$ - maybe a bit more if really in a great shape or really old).

There is tale that says that some coins were minted out of the metal that was originaly used for the statues of the eighteen disciples of the Buddha. People believed that the coins retained some magical powers associated with the statues.



posted on Aug, 2 2017 @ 11:34 AM
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a reply to: theultimatebelgianjoke

It came to me. Literally. Probably a replica.
But thanks that was interesting and helpful.




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