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Historical Egg Preservation Techniques.

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posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 08:30 AM
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I have been watching this cooking channel to do with the 18 hundreds and here he shows a good technique to keep eggs.



Also here he shows how to make portable soup.



Going to make some of this.

Anyone know other ways to keep eggs?.




posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

Using historical knowledge and applying it to survivalism.

Reminds me of the book Dies the Fire by SM Stirling where a dude became a warlord when shtf because he was a Medieval History professor and through his profession knew how to forge Medieval Weaponry and how Medieval people lived.


edit on 7/28/2017 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

Care to explain this egg preservation technique for those unable (or unwilling) to watch a video?



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: Liquesence

The best way in keeping them in limewater.

restoringmayberry.blogspot.co.uk...

Other ways include woodash or coating them in tallow.



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

Thanks for posting this. I never heard of this guy before.
I subscribed to the YT channel now.



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:05 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

Theres the 100 year egg technique.
My wife and I raise chickens and we pickle and also freezedry (have a freeze dryer) scrambled or otherwise cooked and vacuum seal in mylar bags.



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:06 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

Can these preservation methods be used on swan and goose eggs?



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

absolutely...in fact all eggs unwashed can last as long as 60 days without refrigeration



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:14 AM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

Perfect, then our fearless Original Poster can go and harvest some.







edit on 28-7-2017 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:15 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

God I hate Geese, mean dirty bastards



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:15 AM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

You're not alone.



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:31 AM
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Absolutely Love Jas Townsend, been following him on you tube for a while. All of his preserving and cooking techniques come strait from 17th century cookbooks



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:31 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: NigelWilliams

Does the video mention anything about eggs?.



posted on Jul, 28 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

God I hate Geese, mean dirty bastards

I eat them.



posted on Jul, 29 2017 @ 05:27 PM
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Knowledge for keeping. Thanks for posting this guy's info, can never be to prepared.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 07:32 PM
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I love the townsend's youtube channel, they make such interesting videos about the 18th century.

a reply to: testingtesting



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 07:34 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: testingtesting

Thanks for posting this. I never heard of this guy before.
I subscribed to the YT channel now.


There's some interesting stuff on there. I am pondering experimenting with a cheese soup recipe I saw them make. It's bread based and comes out thick. Very simple, so there is plenty of room to play with it and make it more mine.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 04:31 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

absolutely...in fact all eggs unwashed can last as long as 60 days without refrigeration


60 days may not apply to store bought eggs.

If you check eggs in the store before you buy them you sometime find cracked eggs.
Most store with a inhouse bakery will take the eggs with mild cracks and use in there bakery

The badly cracked eggs are trashed.

Then the good eggs in the cartons are put in new cartons and put back on the shelf.
There may be eggs on the store shelf that are two or more weeks old.

The worst thing i have found with these reclaimed eggs that sometimes Omega-3” eggs get mixed in and i really really hate fishy tasting eggs.
edit on 7-8-2017 by ANNED because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: ANNED

Im referring to unwashed farm raised...there is a natural film on eggs that once washed...makes them "porous to oxygen"

If you dont wash them fresh from the coop they last quite some time without refrigeration.

Easiest way to know if an egg is good is to place it in water...if it floats throw it away...bacteria are off gassing and so will you and worse if you eat it!

I raise 25 to 50 laying hens with a few roosters depending on predation and broody hens etc...



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