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Scientists spy new evidence of water in the Moon's interior

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posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 06:26 PM
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I still find it pretty amazing how our understanding of the Universe changes everyday.



A new study of satellite data finds that numerous volcanic deposits distributed across the surface of the Moon contain unusually high amounts of trapped water compared with surrounding terrains. The finding of water in these ancient deposits, which are believed to consist of glass beads formed by the explosive eruption of magma coming from the deep lunar interior, bolsters the idea that the lunar mantle is surprisingly water-rich.



Colored areas indicate elevated water content compared with surrounding terrains. Yellows and reds indicate the richest water content.




Get ready for Space and Moon exploration!!!



Scientists had assumed for years that the interior of the Moon had been largely depleted of water and other volatile compounds. That began to change in 2008, when a research team including Brown University geologist Alberto Saal detected trace amounts of water in some of the volcanic glass beads brought back to Earth from the Apollo 15 and 17 missions to the Moon. In 2011, further study of tiny crystalline formations within those beads revealed that they actually contain similar amounts of water as some basalts on Earth. That suggests that the Moon's mantle—parts of it, at least—contain as much water as Earth's.


My conspiracy mind tells me they knew it already...


The researchers found evidence of water in nearly all of the large pyroclastic deposits that had been previously mapped across the Moon's surface, including deposits near the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites where the water-bearing glass bead samples were collected.


Maybe we are in need of water now, or maybe NASA needs resources to get to the Moon again. Maybe both.

Thoughts, ATS?


Phys.org





posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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maybe NASA needs resources to get to the Moon again. Maybe both.


We need to get back in space and Get Our Ass Off This Planet. If there is usable water on the Moon, we need to start colonies. We could dig down and cover the tops with regolith to help keep radiation out and just use tunnels to travel. Solar energy would be plentiful and we have the tech for that already. That we are trapped on Earth, just sitting ducks for a large asteroid, irritates me to no end.
We put all of our intelligence into making a better cell phone or TV, but take the survival of Mankind for granted.



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 07:30 PM
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a reply to: DAVID64

Mhmm, guess I'm one of these guys that'd rather change the way we live here than moving to a new planet. If we do we're gonna let this repeat. Over and over again.

Then why not make something to prevent this from happening (probably again)?



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: DAVID64

the only inevitable result will be that we screw up the moon just like we have the earth. maybe even faster, as we get more aggressive in our hunt for another place to live.



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 08:21 PM
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originally posted by: vinifalou
a reply to: DAVID64

Mhmm, guess I'm one of these guys that'd rather change the way we live here than moving to a new planet. If we do we're gonna let this repeat. Over and over again.

Then why not make something to prevent this from happening (probably again)?


How about a really big rock hitting earth ? Are you ready for a century as CHUD ? ( Old movie)

Have you ever heard the old saying, "don't put all your eggs in one basket" ?
The expansion into space is insurance for our species. That is more important than personal preferences.

VF



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: PolyCottonBlend

The Moon has no environment to mess up, no life and it's nothing but a big hunk of rock. I'm not sure I get your point as to what exactly we could "screw up".

It's a resource that could be used to our benefit without actually doing any harm.



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 08:59 PM
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originally posted by: DAVID64



maybe NASA needs resources to get to the Moon again. Maybe both.


That we are trapped on Earth, just sitting ducks for a large asteroid, irritates me to no end.


Have you noticed the surface of the moon??????????? It doesn't appear to be a 'safe zone' from any sort of impact from traveling space objects. Although a station or two for research purposes would be an interesting idea or even a very small colony. A place for earthlings as whole? No way.

on topic, why is this just now coming out? Apollo 15 was in 1971, Apollo 17 was in 1972. Are they claiming we didn't start examining the volcanic glass beads brought back from those two expeditions until 2008? And if that is the case, 2008 was nine years ago. Talk about late to the party. Really weird they are just now sharing this information.



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 09:40 PM
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I agree, they knew about this and about a lot of other things a long time ago,this and a lot of other info that they are releasing now is at least40 year old info, we won`t know what they know now until 40 years from now.



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 10:35 PM
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originally posted by: VenatiusFortunatus

originally posted by: vinifalou
a reply to: DAVID64

Mhmm, guess I'm one of these guys that'd rather change the way we live here than moving to a new planet. If we do we're gonna let this repeat. Over and over again.

Then why not make something to prevent this from happening (probably again)?


How about a really big rock hitting earth ? Are you ready for a century as CHUD ? ( Old movie)

Have you ever heard the old saying, "don't put all your eggs in one basket" ?
The expansion into space is insurance for our species. That is more important than personal preferences.

VF


I've heard that one. I've also heard this one:
"Of course you'll have a bad impression of New York if you only focus on the Pimps and C.H.U.D.s."- Marge Simpson



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 10:37 PM
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WHAT makes water? We see rocks, dust and gas all over the universe.



posted on Jul, 25 2017 @ 03:01 AM
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originally posted by: Tardacus
I agree, they knew about this and about a lot of other things a long time ago,this and a lot of other info that they are releasing now is at least40 year old info, we won`t know what they know now until 40 years from now.

And what would be the point of doing that?



posted on Jul, 25 2017 @ 03:04 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
WHAT makes water?

Oxygen and Hydrogen. Oxygen atoms are electron-hungry, and will readily bind Hydrogen atoms to themselves.



posted on Jul, 25 2017 @ 05:28 AM
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a reply to: VenatiusFortunatus

And how moving to Mars would prevent this from happening?



posted on Jul, 25 2017 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: Blaine91555
I agree with you. I think we need to go to the moon and establish a colony. a truly international community working together. What is there to screw up? There is too much greed here for the regular guy to do much about here on Earth now and I think we need a back up in the event something happens we have no control of here on earth. I believe the moon is our future and will be important in the exploration of space. Just my opinion.



posted on Jul, 25 2017 @ 01:03 PM
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originally posted by: vinifalou
a reply to: DAVID64

Mhmm, guess I'm one of these guys that'd rather change the way we live here than moving to a new planet. If we do we're gonna let this repeat. Over and over again.

Then why not make something to prevent this from happening (probably again)?


I think you assume that we would be able to maintain some sort of cohesive culture if we were to colonize other planets/moons, whereas I think it's more conceivable that those colonies would form their own culture and philosophy based on their unique environments. Thus, how we do things on Earth--our policies, politics, etc--would likely experience a steady erosion with each passing generation of the other colonies.

In fact, it may take a colonization event to help us make a leap in our various philosophies, ideologies, etc. It could be a massive amount of needed perspective that might help one arm of humanity--say one of the colonies--evolve its culture to a more enlightened state (whatever that means). And then maybe that could trickle into humanity as a whole somewhat, allowing "human culture" to evolve to some degree.

That takes me back to my first thought and a reevaluation: How much of a so-called "human culture" remains intact when/if we, as a species, colonize other planets? My initial thought was using our Earthly colonization events as an analog. In terms of culture, how much does the US still share with England? Distance and environment will certainly play a role. I dunno. Nice thought experiment though.

I hope that makes as much sense on here as it does in my head!
edit on 7/25/2017 by yadda333 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 25 2017 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: vinifalou
a reply to: VenatiusFortunatus

And how moving to Mars would prevent this from happening?


It wouldn't. But two extinction level events on two separate pieces of solar real estate is a magnitude ofdifference from one event. Ergo, humanity has a better long term chance of survival.

Even aside from all the scientific benefits, the species insurance factor makes it worthwhile.



posted on Jul, 25 2017 @ 04:22 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
WHAT makes water?



The chemical elements in water, hydrogen and oxygen, are some of the most abundant elements in the universe. Astronomers see the signature of water in giant molecular clouds between the stars, in disks of material that represent newborn planetary systems, and in the atmospheres of giant planets orbiting other stars.

nasa - The Solar System and Beyond is Awash in Water.

Seems universe wants there to be water. And here is where god proves she has a sense of humor...


Which is great news for booze enthusiasts. Each molecule of ethanol, the alcohol that gives us so much pleasure, includes nine atoms: two carbon, one oxygen and six hydrogen. Hence the chemical symbol C₂H₆O. It's as if the universe turned itself into a monumental distillery on purpose.

phys.org - Booze in space: how the universe is absolutely drowning in the hard stuff.

Pour yourself a drink! On the rocks of course! Because universe wants you to be happy!

There also clouds of methyl alcohol (wood alcohol, the stuff that makes you blind) out there too.

The moon is not the only place holding water.



posted on Jul, 25 2017 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555


and then when those natural resources run out [because that would be a logical inevitability] your big hunk of rock is ruined. besides that, it'd be one more thing for us humans to fight over.



posted on Jul, 27 2017 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: vinifalou

I honestly think that draining the moon is not a real option anyway unless 100% of the drained water remains on the moon, that is.
If not, the moon would have less mass, the tidal force gets less and the moon will be either pushed away from the earth or drawn to it.
I have no clue if im right but i think it works like that lol



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