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Magnet Fishing - A Heavy Rock I found. Is it a Meteorite ?

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posted on Jul, 23 2017 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

For reference, this is a typical L3 chondrite. It was found in Utah, near upheaval dome.
Been in the desert a long time, no fusion crust visible. Cut one end, polished, the metal matrix and large chondrules evident.

Tested, and was most likely a member of one of a few strewnfields there.
The overall matrix color itself can be light brown, dark brown, metallic grey or combinations thereof.


edit on 23-7-2017 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught




posted on Jul, 23 2017 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: Trueman
Ohhhh, that's exciting. Here's hoping it is rare and worth a lot of money!
Will keep an eye on this thread to hear more.



posted on Jul, 23 2017 @ 07:56 PM
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I have a meteorite, it is heavy and it also feels strange in my hand. I was using it to beat on some other rocks and it is all silvery crystal inside. I didn't know it was a meteorite till after I was using it to hammer on rocks. Someone told me I destroyed it's value. Oh well, now I do not have to worry about someone stealing it anyway.

I also have some nodular hemitite and that a magnet will stick to in the nodular spaces.. If you hold it in your hand you can get ions registering from the circular nob on the end of it when you put an ion meter to it. It is like it converts your energy to ions. I wonder if that could be done to create a power source. My brothers ion meter does not tell you how much energy it puts out but it does put out a high amount on the most sensitive setting. About the same amount as a microwave over dumps into the kitchen about eight feet from the oven. There are lots more ions than that as you get closer to the microwave, it will peg the meter at four feet. After seeing that, I got rid of the microwave. The coffee pot or stove do not register anything at all.



posted on Jul, 23 2017 @ 09:26 PM
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Yep, it has the necessary regmorlyphs.....the thumb dents, but that crust picture looked different idk....

No scrap barges around?.....then it's looking better.....so it's a chondrite, huh!.....rocky!

Editt....the value wasn't really hurt due to hammering.......still lotsa fusion crust huh....no problem bringing one to two thousand or twice that ....magnetite would have that cube to it

editby]edit on 23-7-2017 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-7-2017 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2017 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse




I have a meteorite, it is heavy and it also feels strange in my hand. I was using it to beat on some other rocks and it is all silvery crystal inside. I didn't know it was a meteorite till after I was using it to hammer on rocks. Someone told me I destroyed it's value. Oh well, now I do not have to worry about someone stealing it anyway.


Very few meteorites are crystal like (like quartz nodules), however the exception would be a pallasite. It is a silvery iron matrix with green peridot crystals embedded in it. They only show their real beauty when cut and polished and are among the most valuable of all meteorites under moon or mars meteorites. You can damage the surface, but most meteorites are cut into slices before they are sold anyway, and retain considerable value.

Remember that if it is a meteorite, the main mass of it hit the Earth's atmosphere at cosmic velocity (around 20 to 40 Km/s
and detonated. What is left falls to Earth at terminal velocity. If it somehow made it to the surface at cosmic velocity it would probably be an iron, leave a crater and most likely be vaporized on impact. Most meteorites are pretty tough, but some of the carbonacious chondrites can have the consistency of charcoal, and are extremely rare as well.



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 01:05 AM
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OO what a great sounding hobby!
I want to give it a try,
Just looking at the pics I suspect you have an iron concretion. Are there tiny holes in the crust?
I think you do the mark test on unglazed ceramic,pottery or porcelain.. it's late and I havent read all the replies yet, I know there are several meteorite savvy folks here tho!
Good luck!



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 01:55 AM
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originally posted by: Starcrossd
OO what a great sounding hobby!
I want to give it a try,
Just looking at the pics I suspect you have an iron concretion. Are there tiny holes in the crust?
I think you do the mark test on unglazed ceramic,pottery or porcelain.. it's late and I havent read all the replies yet, I know there are several meteorite savvy folks here tho!
Good luck!

If you mean little holes like craters, yes it has some.



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 11:23 AM
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a reply to: Trueman

I think that you're supposed to rub it on the underside of the plate...the part that touched the table as you have it set in the picture. It's an unglazed part of the ceramic and will give you the proper results.

As a side note, in a pinch, that same part of the plate can be used to sharpen knives if you can't find your sharpener.

Here's to hoping that it's something really cool!



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Thanks for the tip. Will do that after work.

I'm learning a lot with this thread.



posted on Jul, 24 2017 @ 10:45 PM
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originally posted by: charlyv
a reply to: rickymouse




I have a meteorite, it is heavy and it also feels strange in my hand. I was using it to beat on some other rocks and it is all silvery crystal inside. I didn't know it was a meteorite till after I was using it to hammer on rocks. Someone told me I destroyed it's value. Oh well, now I do not have to worry about someone stealing it anyway.


Very few meteorites are crystal like (like quartz nodules), however the exception would be a pallasite. It is a silvery iron matrix with green peridot crystals embedded in it. They only show their real beauty when cut and polished and are among the most valuable of all meteorites under moon or mars meteorites. You can damage the surface, but most meteorites are cut into slices before they are sold anyway, and retain considerable value.

Remember that if it is a meteorite, the main mass of it hit the Earth's atmosphere at cosmic velocity (around 20 to 40 Km/s
and detonated. What is left falls to Earth at terminal velocity. If it somehow made it to the surface at cosmic velocity it would probably be an iron, leave a crater and most likely be vaporized on impact. Most meteorites are pretty tough, but some of the carbonacious chondrites can have the consistency of charcoal, and are extremely rare as well.


Someone threw a nice box out during spring cleanup. It had many very nice and expensive rocks in it, one was this meteorite. The box is probably fifty some years old and in decent shape. I saved all the rocks, they are as good as the ones my Uncle saved, I have his collection. Why these people threw out all those rare rocks and a box that is probably worth at least fifty bucks as an antique I do not know. They must have been cleaning out the attic of the house, there was a lot of junk out by the road during the spring cleanup quite a few years ago. We found a lot of good stuff during the spring cleanups, my wife found three crystal dishes, we found at least six oil paintings in perfect shape too. They tend to put the better stuff out front so someone takes it.

The cities have gotten rid of the spring cleanups now, but a few do have the put out the good stuff you want to give away day. Many people do not have enough stuff to have a rummage sale. I got around fifty old life magazines from one woman during the spring cleanup one year, she had them in the garage and came out when we were there, she was putting stuff out and taking it back in in the evening. I also got around twenty first edition books from the old lady.



posted on Jul, 26 2017 @ 01:32 AM
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The high density is a good clue that it might be Fe-Ni meteorite.
I have found a very small iron meteorite in the past.
Given where I found it, in a sand pit on top of a granite peak, in its own little crater, it was a pretty easy determination. I then proceeded to lose it on the way home
.

And if anyone has a chance, the museum of nat history in DC has a fantastic meteorite collection



posted on Jul, 26 2017 @ 02:47 AM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Besides the rock presented in this thread, I found 3 more. Each one different, but attracted by my magnet. Hopefully I'll find time this weekend to analyze the.

Also sent a photo to a detectorist friend in South America. He has experience with meteorite hunting. He believes it is a meteorite and strongly recommend to sent a fragment to an expert.

I'll try to come back to the same location this Sunday.



posted on Jul, 26 2017 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: Trueman

here are a couple of the specimens from the MoNH





the photos do no justice to the items and i wish the exhibit was better lit, so you could get a decent photo



posted on Jul, 26 2017 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

If you have stumbled over a Strewn Field you could find more.
Good luck with your hunt.

I've never gotten into meteorites, but have put together and sold a couple of large collections of mineral specimens in my life. The first I started in the 1960's as a child would have made many museums envious. I have a small one now.



posted on Jul, 26 2017 @ 06:25 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: Trueman

If you have stumbled over a Strewn Field you could find more.
Good luck with your hunt.

I've never gotten into meteorites, but have put together and sold a couple of large collections of mineral specimens in my life. The first I started in the 1960's as a child would have made many museums envious. I have a small one now.


We'd love to see a thread about your collection


Let me post 2 photos of the other 3 rocks in a minute...

...here :



They not even have the same color but my magnet is not racist at all


What you think?
edit on 26-7-2017 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2017 @ 07:42 PM
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What you think?


 



looks common Earthly stuff to me...


Carboniferous

The Carboniferous is a geologic period and system that extends from the end of the Devonian Period, at 358.9 ± 0.4 million years ago, to the beginning of the Permian Period, at 298.9 ± 0.15 Ma. The name Carboniferous means "coal-bearing" and derives from the Latin words carbō (“coal”) and ferō (“I bear, I carry”), and was coined by geologists William Conybeare and William Phillips in 1822


www.bing.com... ock&sc=2-18&cvid=268d0d4a48224617989c01bff95e23a2&cc=US&setlang=en-US


look at the sample rocks on the linked search site....from Cortiana


now look at the weird stone I still cherish...be it a ocean product or a Cosmos relic, I can't tell, but the stone is 2X heavier than a appox. sized golf ball...




i'll be happy in my own world... be happy in yours



edit on th31150111658626492017 by St Udio because: (no reason given)

edit on th31150111680226532017 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 26 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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a reply to: St Udio

It's always good to have a different approach, even if it is not charming.



posted on Jul, 27 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: St Udio




looks common Earthly stuff to me...


The criteria gauntlet:
What a meteorite looks like is probably 10% of the criteria. I have many that look like common ordinary rocks.
Regmaglypts and flow lines in a fusion crust bump that up 20%
Attracting to a magnet weeds out 70-80% of ordinary rocks, but accounts for another 20% of the criteria.
Passing a Hardness (streak test) with no or little streak, bump the candidate up 50%.
The Chromatograph supplies the definitive test. (nickel,iron,pyroxene,irridium.. and isotopic signatures.



posted on Jul, 27 2017 @ 02:14 PM
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Probably not a meteorite. Likely just a hunk of slag that somebody tossed in the water, or as somebody said, a naturally occurring chunk of semi-metallic rock. It just doesn't look "smooth" enough?



posted on Jul, 27 2017 @ 02:21 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Probably not a meteorite. Likely just a hunk of slag that somebody tossed in the water, or as somebody said, a naturally occurring chunk of semi-metallic rock. It just doesn't look "smooth" enough?


Again, looks are deceiving, and score low as an indicator. Yes, "Probably not a meteorite" always applies, because of the rarity of finding one. You only get a lab involved if you can pass all of the other tests.



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