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Google to relese 20 million sterile mosquitos

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posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

That picture will give me nightmares...




posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: darkbake

originally posted by: Gothmog
My question is
How does anything mate if it is sterile ? Produce offspring ?



Mating is a synonym for sex in this case, and the mosquitoes can, believe it or not, have sex even if they are sterile. It just won't result in any offspring.

But wasnt the freakin point to have offspring that couldnt mate ?
Like I said , a box of rocks. Without the box...



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

You mean the puddles that form on the permafrost layer they migrate over?

Actually, contrary to the myth perpetuated over the years about the northern part of the Slope and ANWR, they don't actually migrate over that area, but we are going a little far afield here and that would be another conversation, for a different thread.

I see no real issue with the attempt to control mosquitoes the way they are doing it. Genetic modification I'm a little uncomfortable with, but not using things already present in nature as a tool.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: InTheLight

You mean the puddles that form on the permafrost layer they migrate over?

Actually, contrary to the myth perpetuated over the years about the northern part of the Slope and ANWR, they don't actually migrate over that area, but we are going a little far afield here and that would be another conversation, for a different thread.

I see no real issue with the attempt to control mosquitoes the way they are doing it. Genetic modification I'm a little uncomfortable with, but not using things already present in nature as a tool.


I don't know, but I've read a couple of times of large herds of caribou drownings (in Canada), but hey, I suppose bodies of water are not always available. How fast do they run...can't they out run them?



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

I'll start a thread about that over the weekend when I'm not working. We should not derail this one. It's not fair to this topic.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:16 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: InTheLight

I'll start a thread about that over the weekend when I'm not working. We should not derail this one. It's not fair to this topic.


Sounds good even though this may be one of the reasons why this virus exists in the first place.

edit on 17CDT06America/Chicago02460631 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:22 PM
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posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

What virus? They are using a form of bacteria?
edit on 7/18/2017 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Kermit, you are fired!



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:25 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight

Mosquitoes are a part of birds' diets, so first the birds' will have a scarcer food source (with already dwindling numbers), and if a few virus-ridden ones manage to become immune to the virus, then what effects will that virus have upon any mosquito-eating birds/animals? Did anyone bother to check?



What good do mosquitoes do?
Mosquitoes fill a variety of niches which nature provides. As such, placing a value on their existence is generally inappropriate. Although the fossil record is incomplete, they have been known from the Cretaceous Period (about 100 million years ago) in North America. Their adaptability has made them extraordinarily successful, with upwards of 2,700 species worldwide. Mosquitoes serve as food sources for a variety of organisms but are not crucial to any predator species.


Mosquitos.org/FAQ

I'd rather have sterile mosquitoes than the tons of the insecticide naled that are dumped in my area every week or so...


Effects on Behavior Exposure to naled has multiple effects on behavior.
In a study conducted by naled’s manufacturer, naled caused reduced muscle strength, slow responses to stimulation, and reduced activity in rats.


Naled Fact Sheet
edit on 18-7-2017 by Ineilio because: Placed "What do mosquitoes do?" in quotes



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: Ineilio

If it targetted mosquitoes only, hey I agree, we can all live without them, but it targets all anthropods. And, I will bet, that no research was done on the increased release of the virus into the environment and it's resulting effects...on us.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:37 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: Ineilio

If it targetted mosquitoes only, hey I agree, we can all live without them, but it targets all anthropods. And, I will bet, that no research was done on the increased release of the virus into the environment and it's resulting effects...on us.


These are genetically modified mosquitoes which will only breed with other mosquitoes (not ants or bees or dragonflies). Am I a researcher on this? No. So I can't say there isn't any chance for horizontal gene transfer, but it's a heckavuh lot more specific than a toxin dumped from the air that kills all arthropods...but hey who am I to judge.

If you have good evidence that no one has, or plans to study whether there is any chance this will have knock-on effects on other arthropod species because that would be just like, a lot of hard work and not worth their time, I'm more than happy to review your citations. But my guess is that they are studying any such effects.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

I thought the same thing - maybe Google have perfected AI and super mini mini mini cameras - save them using cars to film street view - use mozzies instead.

The conspiracy side of me thinks I dont trust them -

Google also owns DeepMind Technologies

en.wikipedia.org...


Controversies[edit] In April 2016 New Scientist obtained a copy of a data-sharing agreement between DeepMind and the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust. The latter operates the three London hospitals where an estimated 1.6 million patients are treated annually. The revelation has exposed the ease with which private companies can obtain highly sensitive medical information without patient consent. The agreement shows DeepMind Health is gaining access to admissions, discharge and transfer data, accident and emergency, pathology and radiology, and critical care at these hospitals. This included personal details such as whether patients had been diagnosed with HIV, suffered from depression or had ever undergone an abortion.[45][46] The agreement is seen as controversial and its legality has been questioned.[25] Officials from Google have yet to make a statement on the matter.

The concerns were widely reported and have led to a complaint to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), arguing that the data should be pseudonymised and encrypted.[47]

In May 2016, New Scientist published a further article claiming that the project had failed to secure approval from the Confidentiality Advisory Group of the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency.[48]

In May 2017, Sky News published a leaked letter from the National Data Guardian, Dame Fiona Caldicott, revealing that in her "considered opinion" the data sharing agreement between DeepMind and the Royal Free took place on an "inappropriate legal basis".[49]

The Information Commissioner’s Office ruled that London’s Royal Free hospital failed to comply with the Data Protection Act when it handed over personal data of 1.6 million patients to DeepMind. [50]



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:39 PM
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originally posted by: Ineilio

originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: Ineilio

If it targetted mosquitoes only, hey I agree, we can all live without them, but it targets all anthropods. And, I will bet, that no research was done on the increased release of the virus into the environment and it's resulting effects...on us.


These are genetically modified mosquitoes which will only breed with other mosquitoes (not ants or bees or dragonflies). Am I a researcher on this? No. So I can't say there isn't any chance for horizontal gene transfer, but it's a heckavuh lot more specific than a toxin dumped from the air that kills all arthropods...but hey who am I to judge.

If you have good evidence that no one has, or plans to study whether there is any chance this will have knock-on effects on other arthropod species because that would be just like, a lot of hard work and not worth their time, I'm more than happy to review your citations. But my guess is that they are studying any such effects.


I'll put my money on the mosquitoe coming through this virus and causing untold havoc.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:52 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight

I'll put my money on the mosquitoe coming through this virus and causing untold havoc.


That's all well and good, though I live in an area where pesticides are sprayed regularly (as are many communities) with pesticides to control the mosquito population.

I agree, viruses and bacteria sound really scary but thankfully there are smart people who muscle through their fear and find a way to use their knowledge of viruses and bacteria to find solutions to today's problems rather than just sitting around fearful of the world around them.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: Ineilio

originally posted by: InTheLight

I'll put my money on the mosquitoe coming through this virus and causing untold havoc.


That's all well and good, though I live in an area where pesticides are sprayed regularly (as are many communities) with pesticides to control the mosquito population.

I agree, viruses and bacteria sound really scary but thankfully there are smart people who muscle through their fear and find a way to use their knowledge of viruses and bacteria to find solutions to today's problems rather than just sitting around fearful of the world around them.


I just don't think these 'smart' people have taken their studies far enough.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: Czulkang

It begs the question, where does one get 20,000 sterile male mosquitos?



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: TobyFlenderson
a reply to: Czulkang

It begs the question, where does one get 20,000 sterile male mosquitos?


From the lab.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: Ineilio

originally posted by: TobyFlenderson
a reply to: Czulkang

It begs the question, where does one get 20,000 sterile male mosquitos?


From the lab.


What about the non-sterile ones, not from the lab? All for naught?
edit on 17CDT06America/Chicago05860631 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Why exactly? What is it about using this already present, very common bacteria Wolbachia that you see as an issue?

California has the most strict regulations in the country, to the point of absurdity and if they are good with it?



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