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Are you a true patriot?

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posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: pthena




A "real patriot" is someone 'from the same country', regardless of ideology, race, religion, political affiliation, or choice of media consumption. Any American is not a patriot of yours if you are from a different country.


That's not true, and it is an etymological fallacy to proclaim words should retain their original meaning.




posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: buster2010

Incompetence is enough for an impeachment?

So in other words, just impeach him because you don't want him as your president.


A true measure of intelligence can be measured by how you measure somebody else's intelligence. Discern at your own free will.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope


an etymological fallacy to proclaim words should retain their original meaning.

So any word can have any meaning in any sentence. Kind of defeats the purpose of language itself.

I understand the idea of definition by usage. That's why I answered the original post in the manner I did, denying being patriotic. Patriotic/unpatriotic labels are often used to shame people into taking certain positions about actions or policies.

I remember well, in the lead up to U.S. voluntary invasion of Iraq, that congressmen and senators not in favor, felt compelled to preface their remarks with: "I'm patriotic but ..."



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 05:18 PM
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a reply to: pthena




So any word can have any meaning in any sentence. Kind of defeats the purpose of language itself.

I understand the idea of definition by usage. That's why I answered the original post in the manner I did, denying being patriotic. Patriotic/unpatriotic labels are often used to shame people into taking certain positions about actions or policies.

I remember well, in the lead up to U.S. voluntary invasion of Iraq, that congressmen and senators not in favor, felt compelled to preface their remarks with: "I'm patriotic but ..."


I'm not sure of your point that any word can have any meaning in any sentence. The purposes of language are many.

My point was that the patriotism you described wasn't the topic.

It's true, "unpatriotic" and "un-American" are attempts at delegitimization. But admitting to being unpatriotic doesn't dispel that slander.


edit on 18-7-2017 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: Aristotelian1

Donald Trump is not perfect, but he is doing his best.... I think he wants the same thing I do-a flourishing and prospering USA.



The 1st thing The Donald did wrong, was bring his family into the White House, and made them part of the government.

Ruling in a democratic capitalist nation is not supposed to be a dynastic or family affair. It's "just a job" that has term limits. After your term is over, you're supposed to be "out." Not to find a way to keep power (like Putin) through promoting associates or family members to take over the roles when you exit.

In Monarchies, "the family" is an important part of the government, because they "inherit" the responsibility for ruling that nation, and need to be totally familiar with the affairs of governing from an early age. So, Royalty rules with the family in toe, having the family members as advisers and playing important roles, to get them involved and practicing to eventually fullfill their obligations.

Trump is treating the White House like a Royal assignment, he comes with his grown children as advisers, as if Ivanka Trump, for example, is being "groomed" to be the next President of these United States.

No doubt, Ivanka will be the 1st female President of the United States. But, it should have been on her own merits, rather than a build up of media attention garnered from her Fathers' reign, like George Bush Jr.

edit on 18-7-2017 by AMPTAH because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: Salander
Mark Twain said that patriotism means supporting your country all of the time, and supporting its government only when it deserves i


Mark Twain was a smart man. Probably because he was a Mason.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 05:52 PM
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I am a true patriot to my country and thus support American leadership and power abroad, to include the Democratically elected President of the United States.

Anyone pushing the fake russo news narrative are traitors and seditionist to this great country, contributing to the divide of this country.

Line them up.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 05:56 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: Salander
Mark Twain said that patriotism means supporting your country all of the time, and supporting its government only when it deserves i


Mark Twain was a smart man. Probably because he was a Mason.


Is that the way it works?

Was he smart, because he was a Mason?

Or did he become a Mason, because he was smart?



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: AMPTAH

First way you had it.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Meh, I prefer the latter...



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:01 PM
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originally posted by: Arnie123
Meh, I prefer the latter...


Ever notice how his career took off after he joined? Coincidence? I think not. Career success = Satan - Your Soul x Damnation.



edit on 18-7-2017 by AugustusMasonicus because: I ♥ cheese pizza.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 06:16 PM
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Im supportive of the US Constitution not a President. Trump is only about Trump. He doesn't care about the US.



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope


My point was that the patriotism you described wasn't the topic.

It's true, "unpatriotic" and "un-American" are attempts at delegitimization. But admitting to being unpatriotic doesn't dispel that slander.

Regardless of the definition of patriot supplied in the article, in context of the article, the meaning would be "A person who refrains from watching, listening to ,or reading media which Trump and/or his surrogates have identified as false and 'enemies of the people', because Trump and surrogates have identified them as such."

In that definition, I am not a patriot because I do watch, read, and listen to sources, eg. CNN, NYTimes, regardless of what Trump characterizes them to be.



admitting to being unpatriotic doesn't dispel that slander

So what? I'm not running for office. Even if the slander sticks, so what? U.S. citizenship or right to vote, or liberty of movement (not incarcerated)
does not depend upon somebody's definition of patriot.
edit on 18-7-2017 by pthena because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2017 @ 11:27 PM
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originally posted by: Aristotelian1
Are you a true patriot? Are you prejudiced?

I try to be neither, because being a patriot often leads to being prejudiced (it can also happen the other way around). Patriotism ties in with nationalism, both of which can cause a heavy amount of prejudice.

Prejudice and Discrimination—Getting to the Roots: Awake!—2009

...
A good start is to acknowledge that none of us are above developing prejudices. The book Understanding Prejudice and Discrimination says: “Perhaps the most important conclusions to emerge from prejudice research are these: (1) no one capable of human thought and speech is immune from harboring prejudice, (2) it often takes deliberate effort and awareness to reduce prejudice, and (3) with sufficient motivation, it can be done.”

Education has been described as “the most powerful tool” in the fight against prejudice. The right education can, for example, expose the root causes of prejudice, enable us to examine our own attitudes more objectively, and help us deal wisely with prejudice when we are victims.

Getting to the Roots

Prejudice causes people to distort, misinterpret, or even ignore facts that conflict with their predetermined opinions. Prejudice may have its beginnings in seemingly innocent, but misguided, family values, or it may be sown by those who deliberately promote warped views of other races or cultures. Prejudice can also be fostered by nationalism and false religious teachings. And it can be a product of inordinate pride.
...
Nationalism. One dictionary defines nationalism as “a sense of national consciousness exalting one nation above all others and placing primary emphasis on promotion of its culture and interests as opposed to those of other nations.” Ivo Duchacek, a professor of political science, observed in his book Conflict and Cooperation Among Nations: “Nationalism divides humanity into mutually intolerant units. As a result people think as Americans, Russians, Chinese, Egyptians, or Peruvians first, and as human beings second—if at all.” A former UN secretary-general wrote: “So many of the problems that we face today are due to, or the result of, false attitudes—some of them have been adopted almost unconsciously. Among these is the concept of narrow nationalism—‘my country, right or wrong.’”
...
Religion. The book The Nature of Prejudice says: “Abominations inevitably result when men use their religion to justify [selfish pursuits] and ethnic self-interest. It is then that religion and prejudice merge.” What is especially striking, the same book observes, is how readily many religious people “seem to slip from piety into prejudice.” Evidence in support of those words is seen in racially exclusive churches, sectarian hatred and violence, and acts of terror inspired by religion.

What does the Bible say? “The wisdom from above [from God] is . . . peaceable, reasonable, . . . not making partial distinctions.” (James 3:17) “The true worshipers will worship the Father with spirit and [religious] truth.” (John 4:23) “Love your enemies and . . . pray for those persecuting you.” (Matthew 5:44) Ask yourself: ‘Does my religion promote genuine love toward all, even toward those who may want to hurt me? Are the doors of my church open to people of all kinds, regardless of nationality, skin color, gender, income, or social status?’

Pride. In the form of inordinate self-esteem or haughtiness, pride can make a person more susceptible to prejudice. For example, pride can cause a person to be prone to feelings of superiority or disdain toward the less educated or the materially poor. It may also make him inclined to believe propaganda that elevates his national or ethnic group. Clever propagandists, such as Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, have deliberately nurtured national and racial pride to rally the support of the masses and to malign those considered to be different or undesirable.
...
Yes, for good reason the Bible cautions: “More than all else that is to be guarded, safeguard your heart, for out of it are the sources of life.” (Proverbs 4:23) So view your heart as truly precious, and let nothing corrupt it! Instead, fill it with godly wisdom. Then, and only then, will ‘thinking ability and discernment safeguard you, to deliver you from the bad way, from the person speaking perverse things.’—Proverbs 2:10-12.

edit on 18-7-2017 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 19 2017 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: buster2010




Incompetence.

Can we impeach posters on the same grounds ?
Do you have Trump's IQ numbers ?
Another opinion piece ? You should head on over to WaPo . Probably hire you....



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