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Does Trump have Dementia?

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posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Skywatcher2011

Hillary was a moron, she was untrustworthy, lied.

She was just as bad a choice as Trump.

I don't know how many times I have to say this to you but being anti-trump does not make someone pro-Clinton.




posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 10:59 AM
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Doesn't matter...Trump is and still will be far, far better for the Country than anyone the Democratic National Communists could come up with to replace him...



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: Iscool
Doesn't matter...Trump is and still will be far, far better for the Country than anyone the Democratic National Communists could come up with to replace him...


So you think that even if he did have Alzheimers that is progressive he would still be a suitable POTUS??



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:16 AM
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We can apply Betteridge's Law of Headlines. "Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no".



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:17 AM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
We can apply Betteridge's Law of Headlines. "Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no".


So care to elaborate on why you don't think Trump could have dementia?



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:19 AM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
We can apply Betteridge's Law of Headlines. "Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no".


So care to elaborate on why you don't think Trump could have dementia?


Nothing has shown me otherwise.



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:21 AM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope

originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
We can apply Betteridge's Law of Headlines. "Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no".


So care to elaborate on why you don't think Trump could have dementia?


Nothing has shown me otherwise.


So you mean that four paragraph note form Trumps doctor that wouldn't pass as a note to get out of gym is enough for you to say with certainty he does not have dementia.

What about his behaviours, his change in speech and the fact he is in a high risk group??

Does that not at the very lest make you think this is a possibility



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:23 AM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
a reply to: Skywatcher2011

Hillary was a moron, she was untrustworthy, lied.

She was just as bad a choice as Trump.

I don't know how many times I have to say this to you but being anti-trump does not make someone pro-Clinton.


I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but you're going to need to repeat this ad nauseum until you no longer vilify their god. Good luck with that though.

As far as your topic, it seems as though normal aging is affecting President Trump.

I personally just don't understand some people's assessment of him being such a genius....ANYONE can be a genius with daddy's money when they have a large enough buffer to fall back on....I think he's just an idiot lacking a shred of human decency more so than him suffering any real mental degradation, or rather, he has never experienced mental evolution enough to consider what he says now as dementia.



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

No, it's that I do not see evidence of dementia, only the rumour-mongering of obsessives.
edit on 16-7-2017 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: Iscool
Doesn't matter...Trump is and still will be far, far better for the Country than anyone the Democratic National Communists could come up with to replace him...


In this day and age, your opinion is not only idiotic , servile, shortsighted, and self-aggrandizing, but downright dangerous.
Are you so juvenile as to belive your choice to fix America is so perfect that a major mental problem is no big deal? ( No, I'm NOT saying he has dementia ,or not.)
Every candidate for higher public office should be examined for physical and mental stability. You don't give the football to someone without a clear thought process.
This is much more important than partisan politics.

VF



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:28 AM
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a reply to: alphabetaone




As far as your topic, it seems as though normal aging is affecting President Trump.


There is a difference between "normal forgetfulness" with ageing and early onset dementia.

Actually part of the reason that so many people get diagnosed with Dementia so long after symptoms start presenting is because a lot of people will put it down to normal ageing. When really its a symptom of something more serious.

The video in the OP showing trumps moments of confusion are very concerning, him just walking right by his car, forgetting to sign the Executive order or him sitting with the German chancellor totally dazed.... these are not "normal" things in my view for a older person to do.



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

No, it's that I do not see evidence of dementia, only the rumour-mongering of obsessives.


So how do you explain his decline in speech?

How do you explain his confusion?

Do you not think that his status as being at high risk does not mean that when we take into account his episode of confusion and his poor language skills that some form of cognitive impairment should at least be considered?



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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I think the mental disorder that we should be talking about relates to the craziness we are seeing in a minority of anti-Trump advocates who are showing that 9 months after an election they still can't deal with their emotions or reality.


Depersonalization disorder (DPD), also known as depersonalization-derealization syndrome, is a mental disorder in which the person has persistent or recurrent feelings of depersonalization and/or derealization. Symptoms can be classified as either depersonalization or derealization. Depersonalization is described as feeling disconnected or estranged from one's self. Individuals experiencing depersonalization may report feeling as if they are an outside observer of their own thoughts or body, and often report feeling a loss of control over their thoughts or actions.[1] In some cases, individuals may be unable to accept their reflection as their own, or they may have out-of-body experiences.[2] While depersonalization is a sense of detachment from one's self, derealization is described as detachment from one's surroundings. Individuals experiencing derealization may report perceiving the world around them as foggy, dreamlike/surreal, or visually distorted.[1] In addition to these depersonalization-derealization disorder symptoms, the inner turmoil created by the disorder can result in depression, self-harm, low self-esteem, panic attacks, phobias, etc. It can also cause a variety of physical symptoms, including chest pain, blurry vision, visual snow, nausea, and the sensation of pins and needles in one's arms or legs. Depersonalization-derealization disorder is thought to be caused largely by severe traumatic lifetime events, including childhood abuse, accidents, natural disasters, war, torture, and bad drug experiences. It is unclear whether genetics plays a role; however, there are many neurochemical and hormonal changes in individuals with depersonalization disorder.[3] The disorder is typically associated with cognitive disruptions in early perceptual and attentional processes.[4] Diagnostic criteria for depersonalization-derealization disorder include, among other symptoms, persistent or recurrent feelings of detachment from one's mental or bodily processes or from one's surroundings.[5] A diagnosis is made when the dissociation is persistent and interferes with the social and/or occupational functions of daily life. However, accurate descriptions of the symptoms are hard to provide due to the subjective nature of depersonalization/derealization and persons' ambiguous use of language when describing these episodes. In the DSM-5, it was combined with Derealization Disorder and renamed Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder (DDPD).[6] In the DSM-5, it remains classified as a dissociative disorder, while the ICD-10 calls it depersonalization-derealization syndrome and classifies it as a neurotic disorder.[7] Although the disorder is an alteration in the subjective experience of reality, it is not a form of psychosis, as the person is able to distinguish between his own internal experiences and the objective reality of the outside world. During episodic and continuous depersonalization, the person can distinguish between reality and fantasy. In other words, the grasp on reality remains stable at all times.[

edit on 16/7/2017 by UKTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

Right, regretfully I'm well familiar with it. As well as the negative aspects of complacency on it. But at what point do we stop over analyzing things and instead relegate them to a part of the natural process anyway?


Youre leaving out the key element of WHY I said what I said, and it boils down to him never having had enough intellectual evolution to call what he displays NOW as dementia. He's simply an idiot. He has ALWAYS struggled with topics; has ALWAYS struggled with unfamiliar subjects....you post two videos, each offsetting the other to display a pattern and, lets face it, that is hardly any type of conclusive control group. I can post videos too from years, MANY years ago when he wasn't in your target age bracket acting exactly the same.


Let's not forget about that whole debacle when he made the phone call pretending to be his own publicist.....



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: UKTruth

hmmm.... intersting.

So now do you care to address any of the issues that I have raised in the OP or are you just going to do what you usually do and deflect



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

All speech declines with age. But He's still quick and sharp. As for confusion, the only sense I get of that pertains to him being a rookie in politics. He's learning fast.

The fact of the matter is yes he is old as balls. It is very possible he can get dementia. I think it is a reasonable question, but when made by those who wish to discredit him, a highly suspect attempt at diagnosing a human being from afar for the sake of slander.



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope




All speech declines with age.


look at the link I posted regarding spontaneous speech patterns compared to Bush Snr and Reagan makes for interesting reading. Its much more than just general speech decline.



But He's still quick and sharp


You sure about that?



It is very possible he can get dementia.


Yup and its also possible he may be displaying some early sings.



I think it is a reasonable question, but when made by those who wish to discredit him, a highly suspect attempt at diagnosing a human being from afar for the sake of slander.


I am not trying to diagnose him only make the point that there is a very really possibility that the Commander in Chief may be starting to show signs of cognitive impairment.



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
a reply to: UKTruth

hmmm.... intersting.

So now do you care to address any of the issues that I have raised in the OP or are you just going to do what you usually do and deflect


It does address your question and also gives you some advice on what you may be going through.
Perhaps you are not seeing things clearly. Take special note of this :


The disorder is typically associated with cognitive disruptions


So, to be more direct. No, I don't think Trump has dementia, I think there is more evidence of a mental disorder in those that keep wishing it were true and pushing it in order to slander a President they did not want to win office.



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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70 isn't really that old. Trump has never smoked, used illicit drugs, nor has he drunk alcohol. He has stayed active playing golf and being involved in business, family, and travel.

As a matter of fact, there is a lot of talk recently in changing the official retirement age from 65 to 70, so lots of people at 70 are healthier and sharper than many are at 50 who don't take such good care of themselves.

I see Trump as naturally hyper (always staying busy), highly focused, and a bit eccentric, to say the least. But, I would have to say 'no' to dementia. Now, Maxine Waters, Nancy Pelosi, John McCain, and a few others I can think of may be another thing.



posted on Jul, 16 2017 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: UKTruth
a reply to: UKTruth
So, to be more direct. No, I don't think Trump has dementia, I think there is more evidence of a mental disorder in those that keep wishing it were true and pushing it in order to slander a President they did not want to win office.


Boy, talk about hyperbole.

I think it's reasonable to have concerns about anyone in power, let alone the president of the US, who doesn't seem to have the capacity to explain his positions to any reasonable amount of depth. Personally, that scares the hell out of me. Considering all the factors outlined in the OP, I don't think it unreasonable to posit the idea of early dementia as an explanation for that.
edit on 16-7-2017 by redtic because: (no reason given)



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