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We all have a trust fund?

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posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 09:50 PM
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So I'm watching the YouTube and I come across some videos where a guy found out how to pay his bills using an account that's in his name and his SS#.

He has a video where he shows you how to access your trust fund account with the Federal Reserve Bank. I will not post that video here.

But I will post this one.

this video is interesting

If you read the comments, it seems to work for some and not for others.

My question is, why are there trust funds in our names?

It's kinda hard for me to explain in detail. But just watch the video.

Oh if you can, can someone embed the video for me please?




edit on 13-7-2017 by galaga because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: galaga

Good luck with this rabbit hole, friend.

You'll quickly come to the straw man argument, which appears to be completely valid- right up until high priced lawyers put you in prison for the rest of your life.



posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 09:54 PM
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originally posted by: lordcomac
a reply to: galaga

Good luck with this rabbit hole, friend.

You'll quickly come to the straw man argument, which appears to be completely valid- right up until high priced lawyers put you in prison for the rest of your life.


I'm not saying I'm going to try this. I'm just asking about an account in all of our names? I had not heard of this until now. How much money do we have in these accounts?


edit on 13-7-2017 by galaga because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: galaga



Here you go.



posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 10:02 PM
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Wonder if this works in Australia ? guess not.



posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 10:06 PM
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originally posted by: mazzroth
Wonder if this works in Australia ? guess not.


I did see a video he had where he mentioned Australia. He was working on it.


+3 more 
posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 10:06 PM
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originally posted by: galaga

originally posted by: lordcomac
a reply to: galaga

Good luck with this rabbit hole, friend.

You'll quickly come to the straw man argument, which appears to be completely valid- right up until high priced lawyers put you in prison for the rest of your life.


I'm not saying I'm going to try this. I'm just asking about an account in all of our names? I had not heard of this until now. How much money do we have in these accounts?



We don't have money in these accounts.
All the money has been transferred to the clinton foundation.

ETA- I am not suicidal in any way, I do not not fly, and I am a very safe driver.

edit on 2017-07-13T22:23:15-05:002201713America/Chicago7 by c2oden because: covering bases.



posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: c2oden

That is funny



ETA- I am not suicidal in any way, I do not not fly, and I am a very safe driver.



posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 11:36 PM
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Curious if anyone has comments on validity of all this??

I probably wouldn't mess with it , but pretty interesting ...


Could research it myself ... but this is ATS and it's past my bedtime.



posted on Jul, 13 2017 @ 11:44 PM
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a reply to: galaga

No we don't.

Strawman Account is a lie.


www.scambusters.org...

www.snopes.com...
edit on 13-7-2017 by Lysergic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:19 AM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
a reply to: galaga

No we don't.

Strawman Account is a lie.


www.scambusters.org...

www.snopes.com...


It didn't work that way. This guy got his FRB routing number and used his ss# as his account #.

He paid his bills on the internet. Nobody filled out any paperwork. It was really simple.
edit on 14-7-2017 by galaga because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:21 AM
link   
a reply to: galaga

Where is the proof of that?

I watched some of the stupid ass video.


Published on Jul 12, 2017
These stunts are performed by trained professionals and should not be tried at home unless your aren't scared of the boogeyman.

The resources you will need to crack my 'hidden' code are located on one site of an entity whose full name has three words. There is BANK in there somewhere

Again, this information is provided for ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY because how entertaining would it be if you could REALLY eliminate all your debt using some silly hidden account 🤣😂🤣

Conspiracy theorists are NUTS


CHECK OUT THE MOTU PROPRIO
Multiple Styles/Colors
teespring.com...

Check Out The Matrix
My First Day
youtu.be...




DISCLAIMER NOTICE: The live stream/video you’re about to view or just viewed is only my opinion. Any and all documents or graphics that is shown with my opinion cannot be construed as legal/lawful advice in any manner, but for entertainment purposes only. Any actions you take from the information given is your responsibility and to research the proper laws pertaining to your jurisdiction. This NOTICE is from a private non-citizen national pursuant to 8 U.S.C. § 1101(a)(21) under Common Law Jurisdiction. "U.S. adopted common laws of England with the constitution." See Caldwell v. Hill, 178 SE 383 (1934).
Category
Education


Smells like BULL#


Maybe he can use some of that money to fix his door frame; eh?


edit on 14-7-2017 by Lysergic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:26 AM
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I am also selling a bridge in Brooklyn.

Hurry don't wanna miss out!



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:37 AM
link   

Redemption / Strawman / Bond Fraud
Proponents of this scheme claim that the U.S. government or the Treasury Department control bank accounts—often referred to as “U.S. Treasury Direct Accounts”—for all U.S. citizens that can be accessed by submitting paperwork with state and federal authorities. Individuals promoting this scam frequently cite various discredited legal theories and may refer to the scheme as “Redemption,” “Strawman,” or “Acceptance for Value.” Trainers and websites will often charge large fees for “kits” that teach individuals how to perpetrate this scheme. They will often imply that others have had great success in discharging debt and purchasing merchandise such as cars and homes. Failures to implement the scheme successfully are attributed to individuals not following instructions in a specific order or not filing paperwork at correct times.

This scheme predominately uses fraudulent financial documents that appear to be legitimate. These documents are frequently referred to as “bills of exchange,” “promissory bonds,” “indemnity bonds,” “offset bonds,” “sight drafts,” or “comptrollers warrants.” In addition, other official documents are used outside of their intended purpose, like IRS forms 1099, 1099-OID, and 8300. This scheme frequently intermingles legal and pseudo legal terminology in order to appear lawful. Notaries may be used in an attempt to make the fraud appear legitimate. Often, victims of the scheme are instructed to address their paperwork to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Tips for Avoiding Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud:

Be wary of individuals or groups selling kits that they claim will inform you how to access secret bank accounts.
Be wary of individuals or groups proclaiming that paying federal and/or state income tax is not necessary.
Do not believe that the U.S. Treasury controls bank accounts for all citizens.
Be skeptical of individuals advocating that speeding tickets, summons, bills, tax notifications, or similar documents can be resolved by writing “acceptance for value” on them.
If you know of anyone advocating the use of property liens to coerce acceptance of this scheme, contact your local FBI office.



www.fbi.gov...


lulz...

Lemme know how it works out guise, lemme know when u gets rich!



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:37 AM
link   

Redemption / Strawman / Bond Fraud
Proponents of this scheme claim that the U.S. government or the Treasury Department control bank accounts—often referred to as “U.S. Treasury Direct Accounts”—for all U.S. citizens that can be accessed by submitting paperwork with state and federal authorities. Individuals promoting this scam frequently cite various discredited legal theories and may refer to the scheme as “Redemption,” “Strawman,” or “Acceptance for Value.” Trainers and websites will often charge large fees for “kits” that teach individuals how to perpetrate this scheme. They will often imply that others have had great success in discharging debt and purchasing merchandise such as cars and homes. Failures to implement the scheme successfully are attributed to individuals not following instructions in a specific order or not filing paperwork at correct times.

This scheme predominately uses fraudulent financial documents that appear to be legitimate. These documents are frequently referred to as “bills of exchange,” “promissory bonds,” “indemnity bonds,” “offset bonds,” “sight drafts,” or “comptrollers warrants.” In addition, other official documents are used outside of their intended purpose, like IRS forms 1099, 1099-OID, and 8300. This scheme frequently intermingles legal and pseudo legal terminology in order to appear lawful. Notaries may be used in an attempt to make the fraud appear legitimate. Often, victims of the scheme are instructed to address their paperwork to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Tips for Avoiding Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud:

Be wary of individuals or groups selling kits that they claim will inform you how to access secret bank accounts.
Be wary of individuals or groups proclaiming that paying federal and/or state income tax is not necessary.
Do not believe that the U.S. Treasury controls bank accounts for all citizens.
Be skeptical of individuals advocating that speeding tickets, summons, bills, tax notifications, or similar documents can be resolved by writing “acceptance for value” on them.
If you know of anyone advocating the use of property liens to coerce acceptance of this scheme, contact your local FBI office.



www.fbi.gov...


lulz...

Lemme know how it works out guise, lemme know when u gets rich!



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:37 AM
link   

Redemption / Strawman / Bond Fraud
Proponents of this scheme claim that the U.S. government or the Treasury Department control bank accounts—often referred to as “U.S. Treasury Direct Accounts”—for all U.S. citizens that can be accessed by submitting paperwork with state and federal authorities. Individuals promoting this scam frequently cite various discredited legal theories and may refer to the scheme as “Redemption,” “Strawman,” or “Acceptance for Value.” Trainers and websites will often charge large fees for “kits” that teach individuals how to perpetrate this scheme. They will often imply that others have had great success in discharging debt and purchasing merchandise such as cars and homes. Failures to implement the scheme successfully are attributed to individuals not following instructions in a specific order or not filing paperwork at correct times.

This scheme predominately uses fraudulent financial documents that appear to be legitimate. These documents are frequently referred to as “bills of exchange,” “promissory bonds,” “indemnity bonds,” “offset bonds,” “sight drafts,” or “comptrollers warrants.” In addition, other official documents are used outside of their intended purpose, like IRS forms 1099, 1099-OID, and 8300. This scheme frequently intermingles legal and pseudo legal terminology in order to appear lawful. Notaries may be used in an attempt to make the fraud appear legitimate. Often, victims of the scheme are instructed to address their paperwork to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Tips for Avoiding Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud:

Be wary of individuals or groups selling kits that they claim will inform you how to access secret bank accounts.
Be wary of individuals or groups proclaiming that paying federal and/or state income tax is not necessary.
Do not believe that the U.S. Treasury controls bank accounts for all citizens.
Be skeptical of individuals advocating that speeding tickets, summons, bills, tax notifications, or similar documents can be resolved by writing “acceptance for value” on them.
If you know of anyone advocating the use of property liens to coerce acceptance of this scheme, contact your local FBI office.



www.fbi.gov...


lulz...

Lemme know how it works out guise, lemme know when u gets rich!



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:37 AM
link   

Redemption / Strawman / Bond Fraud
Proponents of this scheme claim that the U.S. government or the Treasury Department control bank accounts—often referred to as “U.S. Treasury Direct Accounts”—for all U.S. citizens that can be accessed by submitting paperwork with state and federal authorities. Individuals promoting this scam frequently cite various discredited legal theories and may refer to the scheme as “Redemption,” “Strawman,” or “Acceptance for Value.” Trainers and websites will often charge large fees for “kits” that teach individuals how to perpetrate this scheme. They will often imply that others have had great success in discharging debt and purchasing merchandise such as cars and homes. Failures to implement the scheme successfully are attributed to individuals not following instructions in a specific order or not filing paperwork at correct times.

This scheme predominately uses fraudulent financial documents that appear to be legitimate. These documents are frequently referred to as “bills of exchange,” “promissory bonds,” “indemnity bonds,” “offset bonds,” “sight drafts,” or “comptrollers warrants.” In addition, other official documents are used outside of their intended purpose, like IRS forms 1099, 1099-OID, and 8300. This scheme frequently intermingles legal and pseudo legal terminology in order to appear lawful. Notaries may be used in an attempt to make the fraud appear legitimate. Often, victims of the scheme are instructed to address their paperwork to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Tips for Avoiding Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud:

Be wary of individuals or groups selling kits that they claim will inform you how to access secret bank accounts.
Be wary of individuals or groups proclaiming that paying federal and/or state income tax is not necessary.
Do not believe that the U.S. Treasury controls bank accounts for all citizens.
Be skeptical of individuals advocating that speeding tickets, summons, bills, tax notifications, or similar documents can be resolved by writing “acceptance for value” on them.
If you know of anyone advocating the use of property liens to coerce acceptance of this scheme, contact your local FBI office.



www.fbi.gov...


lulz...

Lemme know how it works out guise, lemme know when u gets rich!



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:37 AM
link   

Redemption / Strawman / Bond Fraud
Proponents of this scheme claim that the U.S. government or the Treasury Department control bank accounts—often referred to as “U.S. Treasury Direct Accounts”—for all U.S. citizens that can be accessed by submitting paperwork with state and federal authorities. Individuals promoting this scam frequently cite various discredited legal theories and may refer to the scheme as “Redemption,” “Strawman,” or “Acceptance for Value.” Trainers and websites will often charge large fees for “kits” that teach individuals how to perpetrate this scheme. They will often imply that others have had great success in discharging debt and purchasing merchandise such as cars and homes. Failures to implement the scheme successfully are attributed to individuals not following instructions in a specific order or not filing paperwork at correct times.

This scheme predominately uses fraudulent financial documents that appear to be legitimate. These documents are frequently referred to as “bills of exchange,” “promissory bonds,” “indemnity bonds,” “offset bonds,” “sight drafts,” or “comptrollers warrants.” In addition, other official documents are used outside of their intended purpose, like IRS forms 1099, 1099-OID, and 8300. This scheme frequently intermingles legal and pseudo legal terminology in order to appear lawful. Notaries may be used in an attempt to make the fraud appear legitimate. Often, victims of the scheme are instructed to address their paperwork to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Tips for Avoiding Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud:

Be wary of individuals or groups selling kits that they claim will inform you how to access secret bank accounts.
Be wary of individuals or groups proclaiming that paying federal and/or state income tax is not necessary.
Do not believe that the U.S. Treasury controls bank accounts for all citizens.
Be skeptical of individuals advocating that speeding tickets, summons, bills, tax notifications, or similar documents can be resolved by writing “acceptance for value” on them.
If you know of anyone advocating the use of property liens to coerce acceptance of this scheme, contact your local FBI office.



www.fbi.gov...


lulz...

Lemme know how it works out guise, lemme know when u gets rich!



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:37 AM
link   

Redemption / Strawman / Bond Fraud
Proponents of this scheme claim that the U.S. government or the Treasury Department control bank accounts—often referred to as “U.S. Treasury Direct Accounts”—for all U.S. citizens that can be accessed by submitting paperwork with state and federal authorities. Individuals promoting this scam frequently cite various discredited legal theories and may refer to the scheme as “Redemption,” “Strawman,” or “Acceptance for Value.” Trainers and websites will often charge large fees for “kits” that teach individuals how to perpetrate this scheme. They will often imply that others have had great success in discharging debt and purchasing merchandise such as cars and homes. Failures to implement the scheme successfully are attributed to individuals not following instructions in a specific order or not filing paperwork at correct times.

This scheme predominately uses fraudulent financial documents that appear to be legitimate. These documents are frequently referred to as “bills of exchange,” “promissory bonds,” “indemnity bonds,” “offset bonds,” “sight drafts,” or “comptrollers warrants.” In addition, other official documents are used outside of their intended purpose, like IRS forms 1099, 1099-OID, and 8300. This scheme frequently intermingles legal and pseudo legal terminology in order to appear lawful. Notaries may be used in an attempt to make the fraud appear legitimate. Often, victims of the scheme are instructed to address their paperwork to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Tips for Avoiding Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud:

Be wary of individuals or groups selling kits that they claim will inform you how to access secret bank accounts.
Be wary of individuals or groups proclaiming that paying federal and/or state income tax is not necessary.
Do not believe that the U.S. Treasury controls bank accounts for all citizens.
Be skeptical of individuals advocating that speeding tickets, summons, bills, tax notifications, or similar documents can be resolved by writing “acceptance for value” on them.
If you know of anyone advocating the use of property liens to coerce acceptance of this scheme, contact your local FBI office.



www.fbi.gov...


lulz...

Lemme know how it works out guise, lemme know when u gets rich!



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:37 AM
link   

Redemption / Strawman / Bond Fraud
Proponents of this scheme claim that the U.S. government or the Treasury Department control bank accounts—often referred to as “U.S. Treasury Direct Accounts”—for all U.S. citizens that can be accessed by submitting paperwork with state and federal authorities. Individuals promoting this scam frequently cite various discredited legal theories and may refer to the scheme as “Redemption,” “Strawman,” or “Acceptance for Value.” Trainers and websites will often charge large fees for “kits” that teach individuals how to perpetrate this scheme. They will often imply that others have had great success in discharging debt and purchasing merchandise such as cars and homes. Failures to implement the scheme successfully are attributed to individuals not following instructions in a specific order or not filing paperwork at correct times.

This scheme predominately uses fraudulent financial documents that appear to be legitimate. These documents are frequently referred to as “bills of exchange,” “promissory bonds,” “indemnity bonds,” “offset bonds,” “sight drafts,” or “comptrollers warrants.” In addition, other official documents are used outside of their intended purpose, like IRS forms 1099, 1099-OID, and 8300. This scheme frequently intermingles legal and pseudo legal terminology in order to appear lawful. Notaries may be used in an attempt to make the fraud appear legitimate. Often, victims of the scheme are instructed to address their paperwork to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Tips for Avoiding Redemption/Strawman/Bond Fraud:

Be wary of individuals or groups selling kits that they claim will inform you how to access secret bank accounts.
Be wary of individuals or groups proclaiming that paying federal and/or state income tax is not necessary.
Do not believe that the U.S. Treasury controls bank accounts for all citizens.
Be skeptical of individuals advocating that speeding tickets, summons, bills, tax notifications, or similar documents can be resolved by writing “acceptance for value” on them.
If you know of anyone advocating the use of property liens to coerce acceptance of this scheme, contact your local FBI office.



www.fbi.gov...


lulz...

Lemme know how it works out guise, lemme know when u gets rich!



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