It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

C-130 down in Mississippi

page: 2
21
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 08:12 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Was just about to post that...


Wings dont appear to have disconnected. But they're on fire so..😔

R.I.P.

Edit: ok Zaphod i saw your edit. I see it now.

edit on 10-7-2017 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)


More: 8 recovered now.

edit on 10-7-2017 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 08:28 PM
link   
Can we Id by the rows of Tobacco exactly where the plane went down?
C130's are about as reliable a plane as was ever built, they won't even shake apart in the eyewall of a hurricane.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 08:32 PM
link   
a reply to: Cauliflower

The main wreckage is on the Sunflower-Leflore county line, along Highway 82.

The debris field covers a 5 mile radius. The aircraft was carrying ammunition, which has caused problems for responders.
edit on 7/10/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 08:43 PM
link   
"Mishap"

Is that common nomenclature for "accident investigations"

And almost looks like it got pushed down, like a belly flop?
And crushed?
With the engines and fuel burning after impact?

What happened here?



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 08:52 PM
link   
Did the plane disintegrate with no visable reckage like flight 93 or no ?



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 08:53 PM
link   
a reply to: iWontGiveUP

It's on its back.

Accident discussions are kept as sterile as possible. The aircraft will be referred to as the Mishap Aircraft (MA), and the crew the Mishap Crew (MC) with each crew member referred to by their position with mishap included.

We know they broke apart in flight. That's the only way to get a debris field that size. Based on the truncated horizontal stabilizer on the left side of the debris field, it appears that the right horizontal stabilizer broke off before the crash (you have to flip the stabilizers since it's on its back). That would have caused the aircraft to go out of control.

Based on the fact that it's recognizeable as an aircraft, it fell more or less straight down. That tells me that they flipped on their back, and went into an inverted flat spin. With only one working elevator, they didn't have the control authority to recover.

That's my theory based on the wreckage.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 08:56 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Always impressed with your knowledge.

While I'm sad this occurred, I'm thankful we can learn from these tragedies from people such as yourself.




posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 08:59 PM
link   
a reply to: CuriousPaddy

Not every plane crash has to do with 9/11. I know that's hard to believe but it's true. Not even false comparisons to wreckage.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 09:01 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

This is just awful. I spent a lot of time in and around C 130A's when I served and I've jumped out of plenty of perfectly good ones without any problems.

A really close friend was a crew chief on one for the Air National Guard up here in NY and spent a fair amount of time on base with him showing me all the ins and outs of these monsters when he was trying to convince me to go Air Forde instead of the Army because my post military career options would have been significantly increased going that route as opposed to a dirty 11 B. He kept telling me that with my ASVAB scores that I was throwing my life away. In hindsight, he was right because my body is a giant mess in my early 40's and the outcome would have been much different had I taken a career track that was less hostile to my physical well being.

They are some very impressive machines and I was astounded at the OCD level of attention to detail he went through before he would let his crew leave the ground. My thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of everyone on this flight. To say it's a terrible tragedy is the understatement of the year.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 09:12 PM
link   
a reply to: peter vlar

Accidents like this one are horrible because they had all that time from when the stabilizer went, to impact to know what was going to happen. I'm sure the flight crew fought the entire way down, but the rest of the people on board had nothing to do.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 09:57 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58


Exactly. And I just can't imagine the feeling of helplessness in that scenario, knowing that theres not a damned thing you can do but ride it out and say a prayer. If the stabilizer went and the plane flipped over on its back, there's absolutely nothing to be done as a passenger but watch the descent as if its in slow motion. I really can't imagine the panic and utter fear going through their minds in those moments. Hell, to this day I hate flying commercial. The take off I'm fine. Cruising altitude... no problems. We start our descent for landing and I'm all nerves because I was never in the plane for a landing lol we went up, did our check, waited for the green light and go...go...go... and I was out. So the landing alone freaks me out. THIS "landing" ... I can't even begin to comprehend and I just feel horrible for anyone that wasn't flight crew because at least they had a job to do and if nothing else it serves as a distraction until you hit ground. Ughhh.... my heart breaks for these Marines and their families. I really hope it wasn't someone on the ground who was at fault when the investigation is all said and done. It's just a real mind F# even thinking about this. I still live near where I grew up and the house I own is very near Stratton where the 109th is based out of and my house is right there and I watch them landing multuple times a day. They are so low over my house that I can almost see inside the cockpit so it just feels a little too close to home for me with my personal history with these planes and my proximity to the 109th.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 09:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Zaph! The link now says 16 dead. Typo? There's a conference feed but requires a plug-in.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 10:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Bigburgh

Apparently not. Multiple sources are saying 16 on board now.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 11:17 PM
link   
Sources are saying all 16 have been recovered.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 11:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Sounds like a team...

Flying south towards Eglin?



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 11:29 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

While I'm gad that all remains are recovered and the families can have closure, I was hoping for some minor miracle and some survivors. I knew the likelihood was highly unlikely, but my eternal optimism does bring out a smidgen of naiveté in these cases. Fingers crossed that it wasn't negligence by someone on the ground that led to this. Any idea how old this particular aircraft was? Would they even give that info in the public statement they will inevitably release?



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 11:32 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Thanks for keeping up the thread. I stopped when i saw Structural Failure @ 20,000 feet.

Now just updated..
"According to the Associated Press, 12 bodies have been recovered so far from the wreckage in rural Mississippi."

1st we give condolences..
Then we wait for a year for the cause.
😔

I hate these things.


edit on 10-7-2017 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 11:53 PM
link   
a reply to: iWontGiveUP

They came out of the Naval Support Activity, and would have been heading to a Naval or Marine Air Station. Having 16 on board with a weapons shipment sounds like an augmented crew, along with the babysitters for the weapons. That means they had a long day of flying ahead of them.



posted on Jul, 11 2017 @ 12:04 AM
link   
a reply to: peter vlar

It'll come out over the next few days. There are always tidbits of information that get leaked out. I'll keep my ear to the ground and see what I can see over the next few days.

USNI is reporting it as a J, which means it's not very old, but they're the only ones reporting it as a J. They're mostly operating Js, but they still have about a dozen T models. So it could be either.
edit on 7/11/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2017 @ 12:13 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Based on the flight path
and the minimal amount of fuel based on the fires
And the weapons/ordinance?
A mid-air explosion?

Not a long flight at all...


edit on 11-7-2017 by iWontGiveUP because: Edit




top topics



 
21
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join