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Paranoia grips the U.S. capital

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posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 12:01 PM
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not the board, just the image that heads it


'orange alert' is from The Prisoner, whenever Number 6 escapes they say 'orange alert!'




posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 12:11 PM
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Huh?
You might wanna expand your horizons with regard to information and sources. Rumsfeld and Goss are currently pushing the CIA out to the very outer limits of responsibility, seizing near-complete control of the budget and are not accountable to anyone for their deep black ops. If you support these moves, you would've done well in the former Soviet Union, commrade.


ECC,
My sources are employees of the CIA and the DIA.

The reason the DIA had to become more actively involved in SOCOM operations is because CIA Ops was stretched too thin and was suffering from the effects of crushing congressional oversight, which had the effect of limiting their ability to do their jobs.

If Rumsfeld and Goss feel that the CIA is bungling field ops badly enough to warrent the creation of a ops support group at DIA, well, that is their perogative. They are, after all, members of the President's cabinet with broad powers. Everyone who hasn't been living under a rock for the last 10 years knows that the CIA is having trouble breaking out of its "Cold War" menatility, and has been slow to embrace the fast-moving, fluid ops tempo that the modern war on terrorism demands.

The phrase "extra-legal missions", by the way, was a reference to international law, not US law.

Rumsfeld could go to Germany any time he wanted. The legal action pending against him is a civil suit by private citizens in a civil court. His diplomatic immunity, which is guarentted by treaty, is shield enough to ensure that. I suspect most of the readers of your post(s) already understood this fact, I'm surprised that you did not.

While I personally dislike Rumsfeld and his bad policies, I am not going to criticize how he keeps his house, having never walked a mile in his shoes.....

And I also make it a habit to not believe everything I read on the internet, and in foreign newspapers for that matter, regarding US intelligence policy and the conspiricy to invent the American Nazi Party.....sheesh

I am suddenly reminded of the word of the fictional Col. Jessup (as portrayed by Jack Nicholson)....

"We use words like honor, code, and loyalty. We use these words as the backbone to a life spent defending something. You use 'em as a punchline. I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom I provide, then questions the manner in which I provide it. I'd rather you just said thank you and went on your way".

I know A LOT of people who feel this way, yet due to their professionalism and sense of duty, they would never utter those words out loud.

Start showing the names and faces of US citizen who have been deprived of their liberties, real liberties, and then maybe your statements might hold some water. Otherwise I hear nothing but rhetoric.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 12:17 PM
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Rumfeld does not want to go to Germany because he does not want to endure the public response that will welcome him in that country.

By the way our are not the only one with friends in the CIA.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 12:36 PM
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Originally posted by Pyros
I am suddenly reminded of the word of the fictional Col. Jessup (as portrayed by Jack Nicholson)....

"We use words like honor, code, and loyalty. We use these words as the backbone to a life spent defending something. You use 'em as a punchline. I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom I provide, then questions the manner in which I provide it. I'd rather you just said thank you and went on your way".


Col. Jessup was arrested shortly thereafter for ordering the murder of a young man to make sure his IDEA of how military should function remained intact. The very quote of this line shows the contradiction in your mind but more importantly the truth of the matter and the facts that exist for every citizen to behold, whether military or no, that the SecDef is as corrupt as Col. Jessup.

Those who believe murder is the just effect to garner their belief in a system or ttheir OWN analogy of how any government shall run is not only guilty by the law but should be tried by the law. How pitiful we are today that the very leaders of our nation are the murderers, the thieves, and the liars who are above the law.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by Ritual
Really? Nothing in his biography indicates he is American that I can see.


No American citizen could possibly disagree with FearLess LeeDar.
You Bushies are sumthin else.
Guess what? I'm a Republican, a Christian and a WAR VET. BushCo. is the most corrupt administration in U.S. history.

As my VIETNAM VET buddy likes to say to Bush sycophants:

Your flag wavin' ain't gonna getcha into heaven no more!

AMEN, BROTHER.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 03:22 PM
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Originally posted by Pyros
ECC,
My sources are employees of the CIA and the DIA.


As if you were the only person on ATS with connections.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 04:51 PM
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Originally posted by Ritual
Where in the bill of rights or the Constitution does it say that they cant?


It doesn't have to, any powers not specifically granted to the government in the constitution are not theirs, they are the people's



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 05:00 PM
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EastCoastKid-

You have to understand, as long as some people have their buffalo wings on Friday night and their six pack, they do not care in the slightest what could be going on in the US.

It wont be long now before we see "special forces" at every street corner- Looks like things are progressing for this nation, doesnt it.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 05:38 PM
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My conversation with Eric Margolis earlier today about what country he is a citizen in.

Me: "I was wondering if you were from the US and just resided in Canada or what your nationality is"

Mr. Margolis: "American residing in Canada. I call myself a North Americaner".

Me: "Sorry I dont think I was specific enough. What country are you a citizen of, since Canada is America too".

Mr Margolis: "Born NYC".

Me: "Are you a citizen of the US or Canada since you can be born somewhere and change citizenships".


No reply back.

Either too anti USA to admit his citizenship or he was born in the US and is now a citizen of Canada. Oh well I tried getting a straight answer.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 05:41 PM
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Originally posted by Ritual
Mr. Margolis: "American residing in Canada. I call myself a North Americaner".



Your answer is there. If this is how someone chooses to identify, why have a problem with that, for any reason?



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 05:49 PM
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For whatever reason when he said he called himself a North Americaner that he was saying he was just in America and was therfore an American. Since everyone who lives in North and South America is American.

So a Mexican is an American. Same with a Brazilian. Same with a Canadian. It was kind of broad.

And the next response I got was the same smoke and mirror about the whole thing. How hard is it to say your a citizen of the US. Instead he tells me where he was born, which lead to my next question of again asking for a specific.

Secret Service probably banished him to Canada or something and he is holding a grudge.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 06:04 PM
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Does it really matter where he is from? His article is an opinion piece (which I happen to agree with), and if you don't agree, stating he is not an American doesn't really change things does it?

Anyway, perhaps people that can see the US from the outside in can be a little more objective and have some insights that can broaden your horizons somewhat.

And yes, I'm Canadian, but I have opinions on US and other countries politics especially when they affect the world as a whole.



posted on Feb, 7 2005 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by ColonelForbin

Originally posted by Ritual
Where in the bill of rights or the Constitution does it say that they cant?


It doesn't have to, any powers not specifically granted to the government in the constitution are not theirs, they are the people's


Here's where it says they can't: The Posse Commitatus Act

And that's the law.



posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 08:03 AM
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Originally posted by Ritual
My conversation with Eric Margolis earlier today about what country he is a citizen in.


It doesn't matter, either way. That's just a poor attempt at diverting the issue from the fact that he's saying things the US Corporate media is too spineless to say.

He mentions Cointelpro. If you don't know what that is, look into it. It's back.



posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 08:09 AM
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Originally posted by Chakotay

Originally posted by ColonelForbin

Originally posted by Ritual
Where in the bill of rights or the Constitution does it say that they cant?


It doesn't have to, any powers not specifically granted to the government in the constitution are not theirs, they are the people's


Here's where it says they can't: The Posse Commitatus Act

And that's the law.


Not for long, if Rumsfeld has his way.

Look into OPERATION NORTHWOODS. The DC Sniper case comes straight out of it. The point? To weaken Posse Commitatus to the point of being irrelevant. Successful? Absolutely.

Basically what we'll be seeing in the near future is the assassination and disappearing of people who stand up and speak truth to power. There's no other reason to loose Rummy's goon squads upon our own soil. He's a f-ing little madman.



posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 09:19 AM
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Perhaps Paranoia is rapidly becoming a world wide problem. Seems like everyone (countries) are looking over their shoulders in this time.
Dallas



posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 11:19 AM
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They have good reason to be paranoid. If BushCo. doesn't like your country's views/policies, you're "with them." We all know what that means.



posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 11:47 AM
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To clarify:

Toronto Sun's Eric Margolis was quoting William Arkin. Margolis said:


This week, former military intelligence analyst William Arkin revealed a hitherto unknown directive, with the Orwellian name "JCS Conplan 0300-97," authorizing the Pentagon to employ special, ultra-secret "anti-terrorist" military units on American soil for what the author claims are "extra-legal missions."

William M. Arkin's bio can be read here. He sounds like he knows what he's talking about.


Arkin served in the U.S. Army as an intelligence analyst in West Berlin from 1974-1978. After leaving the Army, wrote a ground breaking book in 1981 on how to do research on military and national security affairs, coauthored the first volume of the Nuclear Weapons Databook series for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the first comprehensive unclassified reference book on nuclear weapons, a book the Reagan administration sought to suppress on secrecy grounds. He then coauthored a best selling book in 1985 – Nuclear Battlefields – revealing the locations of all U.S. and foreign nuclear bases worldwide. Again the Reagan Administration condemned the work.

The PDF that mentions JCS Conplan 0300-97 is on his website and can be downloaded here.

You'll find that plan about halfway down this PDF.



posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 12:05 PM
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Arkin's got one helluva interesting biography. I wonder if he ever sleeps?


thanks for the links.


[edit on 19-09-2003 by EastCoastKid]



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