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BOMBSHELL: New Report Shows Guccifer 2.0-DNC Files Were Copied Locally—Not Hacked

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posted on Jul, 9 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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We've known this for months now, and we've also known this will get no airtime on the Corporate Media. Do you think outing themselves and their IC masters as frauds was ever really going to happen? Of course not. They will keep the Russia Hoax going until they have totally destroyed Trump and any chance we had to restore America. That's what they get paid for.




posted on Jul, 9 2017 @ 11:43 PM
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And for those who cry hypocrisy/ anonymous source; the anonymous in Washington post get paid and a high incentive from their corporate overlords; this guy is just trying to get the truth out.



posted on Jul, 9 2017 @ 11:45 PM
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Not sure what's been posted yet, but USB 2.0 has a practical transfer max speed of 25mb/s. Go see for yourself. If the data were copied at that rate, it's almost assuredly a USB 2.0 copy as the bus gets saturated on a large file write copy or read operation, assuming of course opposite media is fast enough to serve at that rate.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 12:57 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Its because your internet connection is rated in Mbps (Mega(bits) Per Second) the maximum data transfer speed of the connection, when you download in a program, the program shows you how much of the program you are downloading per second. Programs are in Mega(bytes), so in this context mbps has two meanings in IT world.

When referring to transfer units the B means "bits" and when referring to file size/download the B then means "byte"

There's exactly 1024(kb) in 1(mb)
so 50(mb) x 1024(kb) = 51200(kb)

51200(kb) / 8(bits) = 6400kbps / 1024 or 6.25mbps theoretical maximum file download speed, you also need to deduct about 13-18% roughly depending on the case for packet overheading... In your final download speed is somewhere around 5.5mbps to 6mbps assuming the host your downloading from can send you that much...

But still the point they are using is silly, he's not saying its unlikely it got hacked because it was downloaded at 25mbps, the (analyst) probably meant that when you hack something and your trying to download files secretly, you don't hit the pedal to the metal and redline the file transfer speed because its going to make noise and the IT guy will probably pick it up, especially if all of a sudden his network slows down, your trying to act covertly to maintain access for as long as possible... So instead of trying to download the file in 2mins at 25mbps any normal (cracker not hacker) would download it at much lower speed and let it download for awhile to blend in the rest of the connections so nothing looks abnormal...

But that's under the assumption that "whoever did it planned to maintain access", nothing in there takes in account the perpetrator might just not have gave a f*** or was just in a rush trying to pull it out of there a.s.a.p...

It could also mean they used USB "because" use real time transfer speed is roughly usually around 26mbps in most cases, regardless the author made alot of assumption and is very narrow minded in his diagnostic, he already made up his mind and just points at the facts that works for his mindset...

You can't really tell if a file was copied through usb/lan/wifi all you can tell is the timestamps in the file, the creation times vs the time the file was closed so he checked the time it was created, the size of the file and the time it closed and calculated the speed a file would need to be transferred to fit within those two time boundaries and assumed from there applying normal hacking behaviors...

He didn't take in account it could have been someone that didn't care, they wanted to get in, knew what they wanted and soon as they saw it went for the grab and didn't care for maintaining access. If all you want is a single file, you just downloaded it a.s.a.p with a good connection speed you will fetch it before the IT/Sys admin have time to react unless he's already logged in and got alarms on which is unlikely...

Also we don't know the server specs, was it running on a cheap connection, if the server was hooked up to a connection that push less than 26mbps and then the timestamps shows it was transferred at 26mbps then this then becomes a bombshell, because it would have been impossible to do from the internet only with physical access to the server, but right now this article proves not much beside assumptions and theories...

I do think the Russia hack thing is bs plain and simple but that forensic guy is fetching...


edit on 10-7-2017 by _R4t_ because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 12:59 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

This is most likely completely bs.

The only people that would have access to this server is CrowdStike and if this is a CrowdStrike employee then he needs to come public and not hide his identity, there would be no consequences short of him being fired.

No one has access to this server, not even the FBI, only CrowdStrike.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:05 AM
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I don't even have the fastest internet package, and I can get 20mb/sec downloads. I do it quite routinely, actually.

As soon as I got that far, I said "rubbish" to this fake news story.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:13 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

More evidence posted here than I have seen during the course of the whole 'Russian' investigation.

23MB/s makes me think it was either a usb2 flash copying large files or a usb3 copying many small individual files (also possibly limited by the local network) but 23MB/s indicates gigabit LAN.

This is interesting!



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: GreenGunther

I have a 200 megabit connection. I get 25 megabytes a second.

Sometimes, even a little bit more during non-peak hours, depending. I think my ISP gives people a bit more than stated to handle heavy traffic times.

So, that fact alone makes me think this entire story is crap.




posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:18 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra

originally posted by: underwerks
a reply to: Xcathdra

My internet connection is at 54 MB/s right now.

So...


Mine is around 50 however when you try to download something you wont hit 50mbs. It will drop way down to around 1mbs to about 4mbs, depending on type of connection. You wont be getting anything near 23mbs.


I really wish some of you would learn about what you're talking about before talking about it with such conviction.

A standard USB 2.0 bus speed is 480mbps (megabits per second) which is the rough equivalent of 60 MBps (megaBYTES per second).

Any document copied locally would have transferred at a MUCH higher speed than 23 mbps and the ONLY bottleneck that could possibly have existed would have been on severly outdated and ancient technology whereby a USB data bus would be operating at only version 1.0

By the way, my fiber optic connection at my house is far in excess of 150 mbps (megabits per second) and if Russia were performing state sanctioned hacking, they would be in the realm of gigabits per second transfer rates.

If you're going to attempt to inform someone, especially based upon baseless and factually irresponsible information, at the very least why don't you make an attempt to learn about it.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: Kettu

you get 20mb/s, not 20MB/s - there's a difference.
Also, I'm betting the transfer rate is not the only evidence showing these files were copied over a local network.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: GreenGunther

You don't know what you're talking about.

200 Mbps = 25 MBps

200 Megabits

=

25 Megabytes

I have a 200 megabit per second connection. That means I get 25 megabytes per second.
edit on 10-7-2017 by Kettu because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:28 AM
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From this handy calculator:



What is a Megabit per second (Mbps)?

A Megabit per second is a unit used to measure data transfer rates and is based on "Decimal multiples of bits". The symbol for Megabit per second is Mbps or Mb/s or Mbit/s. There are 8 Megabits per second in a Megabyte per second.

What is a Megabyte per second (MBps)?

A Megabyte per second is a unit used to measure data transfer rates and is based on "Decimal multiples of bits". The symbol for Megabyte per second is MBps or MB/s. There are 0.125 Megabytes per second in a Megabit per second.

checkyourmath.com

200/8 = 25.

200 megabits divided by 8 = 25 megabytes.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: alphabetaone



Any document copied locally would have transferred at a MUCH higher speed than 23 mbps


The article indicates it was transferred at 23 MBps. Mega BYTES.

USB 2 speeds normally max out at 280Mbps (35MBps) due to bus access.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: Kettu

Unfortunately I do know what I'm talking about.

I'm quoting you here -


I don't even have the fastest internet package, and I can get 20mb/sec downloads.


Meaning 20 megabits/s
If you meant to say MB then please say you made a mistake?



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:40 AM
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originally posted by: Kettu
I don't even have the fastest internet package, and I can get 20mb/sec downloads. I do it quite routinely, actually.

As soon as I got that far, I said "rubbish" to this fake news story.


It's not about download speeds, it's about the upload speed of the DNC server which was most likely not to 20mb/sec, probably half that but we have no way to know for sure.

You can only download as fast as the server can upload.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:41 AM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
a reply to: JoshuaCox

3 replies on the first page, all trying to discredit the article. Trying a little too hard aren't you?


From my POV, all this does is actually validate the article. The more they try, the more obvious it becomes. With enough of an effort, you can determine which truths they are afraid of.

Keeps the mind busy and amused.

P



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: GreenGunther

Okay, whatever. Trying to parse everything here because I failed to capitalize two letters.


And I'm sure the DNC servers are capable of pushing well beyond 23 megabytes per second, as they have to coordinate campaigns nation wide, and some of those files are quite large.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 01:59 AM
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a reply to: Kettu

You don't know that for sure. There needs to be more investigation. It seems a simple enough question to have answered.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: RainbowPride

And you don't know that they don't have a halfway decent upload speed.

The DNC would need good upload speeds for vid conferences and the like. It sounds like people here haven't worked in the corporate sector or something.

Organizations like the DNC aren't on residential internet plans. They have offices all over the country and have to send large data sets and files to one another all the time.

I'd be shocked if they have anything LESS than 50 megabytes/sec upload speed.



posted on Jul, 10 2017 @ 02:47 AM
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The download and upload speed is about 1:8 ratio to the official speed. So in the best case scenario, upload speed of the DNC had to be 184 Mb/s.



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