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Ocean Bottom Seismometers Off Of Pacific Northwest Coast Are Online!

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posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 08:10 PM
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Now this is pretty cool for someone like me that is into monitoring live seismic data for earthquakes and volcanoes. The ocean bottom seismometers they have been working on for years have finally come online, and are streaming real time data, as of mid June. I discovered this as I was searching for something else.

This means in the event of the Big One off the Pacific coast, the seismic waves will now hit these stations first, before they ever arrive on land! And that means, now that I have a few of them up and running on my rig, it might be possible to give earlier warning if a big quake were to happen. I have asked over at the PNSN site if this is tied into any kind of early warning system yet, so we'll see what they say.

This venture is an extremely well thought out and planned initiative that took many years in the making. And it is not for just seismic data, but much more. It is called the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), and their website can be seen here:
oceanobservatories.org...

Japan has had something like this for many years now, in order to get a jump on warning their population against those massive offshore quakes. We face a very similar situation off the west coast, as many know, and so it is great to see this program finally delivering data. The data streams are real nice and clear, and hopefully the instruments won't be impacted too much from being at the bottom of the ocean.

What I notice so far is that interestingly, there is a lot of very low frequency energy (like 1 to 2 Hz) residing constantly at the bottom of these spectros. It is very reminiscent of what I see off the Japan coast. Big, mean, and extremely powerful. Take a look at their site, and for anyone wanting to access the live seismic data feeds, if you need help, PM me.




posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 08:24 PM
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Very cool. Great link, it will be fun to go thru it. Thanks!



posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

Are these the sensors that the Navy has to scrub sensitive signals from before the data gets passed on to scientists?

Is there anything to which those low frequency signals can be attributed?



posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

Q1: I seriously doubt it. The data is coming in just like any other seismic data, right off the seismometers, through a data logger, and passed on to IRIS.

Q2: that I'm not sure. This 1-2 Hz hot band is present in some other data feeds too around the world, and actually, on quite a many stations. For instance, Cleveland volcano in Alaska just had a minor eruption, and one of the channels there has this band looking hotter than normal. I see this band hot on a station or two down in the Caribbean as well. And of course, in Japan on several of their stations. Chile shows this as well on some of theirs, and particularly during hot periods of large quake and aftershock sequences. I don't know what it is for sure, but it is scary looking. Anything down that low gives me pause.
edit on Tue Jul 4th 2017 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 09:09 PM
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Thanks for sharing, something else for me to keep an eye on.




posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 09:54 PM
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Well I suppose I should point out that the seismic waves will hit these new seismometers first, but only IF the quake occurs along the mega thrust fault out in the ocean. If it's closer to shore, or even under land, then obviously the land seismometers are going to pick them up first...

But if it's anything like what happened in Japan in 2011, with the epicenter out at sea, these new seismos could be very helpful, and may even give me just enough time to get a post up. Of course by the time you read it, you will be shaking profusely- probably. But better almost early than never.

edit on Tue Jul 4th 2017 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2017 @ 11:36 PM
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originally posted by: jadedANDcynical
a reply to: TrueAmerican

Are these the sensors that the Navy has to scrub sensitive signals from before the data gets passed on to scientists?

Is there anything to which those low frequency signals can be attributed?


Well there is that inter dimensional rift around that area.....



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 09:48 AM
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originally posted by: TrueAmerican
The ocean bottom seismometers they have been working on for years have finally come online ... I discovered this as I was searching for something else.

Did you find this odd?



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: Snarl

No....? Nothing odd about it. I knew about the fact that they were trying to get that program going, and forgot about it long ago. We've talked about it before here on ATS. But it was just like yesterday I happened to notice that the real time data started streaming in June. What's your point? Or do you have one?



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: TrueAmerican
What's your point? Or do you have one?

I know you're one of the ATS SMEs on this topic. I was wondering if you knew (or suspected) something that just slips past the notice of the masses.

Has this equipment been working ... and the data produced restricted?
What was your opinion on an 'unannounced' activation? I'd think something like this might have made the news .. a long-term project coming to fruition.

I'd also like to know if you think there are any potential military applications in this system. Can it detect ... things?



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: Snarl

From what I can tell, the seismometers have been producing data since about August 2014. And as far as I can tell, the data has not been restricted, because it is available in archive at IRIS. Going online streaming though is a bit different, and that portion of this has just been available since early June 2017. Network changes and projects added are not generally "big news" that is reported much of anywhere except maybe in bulletins within the industry.

Curiously though, data has stopped flowing today. But it stopped flowing from Yellowstone too the other day, and then came back up. It just means there's an issue usually at the data warehouse (IRIS). The scientists probably still see it, it's just for the moment it is down from IRIS to the public. It is relayed data from the individual network that operates the seismometers. There is a lot of telemetry there, so a lot can go, and often does go, wrong.



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 11:59 AM
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The low vibration (Tesla) is because Earth's root chakra is to hold the third density or dimension. If it's something else then earth was meant to be flat.

Anyway don't worry too much if something does happen.

Think of it is a cleansing for the earth. Sure we might die and lose every beautiful thing in life but it's another way of showing how much damage we caused to our gift. The only gift the creator ever gave us was this earth.



posted on Jul, 5 2017 @ 10:31 PM
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And, just like Yellowstone, the data is back again from these ocean bottom seismos. Some of these instruments are setup around an underwater volcano off the west coast, called axial sea mount. Some time back, it erupted, and I only wish I had access to the data back then. Our scientists captured the whole thing, up close and personal, with seismometers surrounding the volcano all over. You can read about that whole experience here:
Massive Underwater Eruption Captured in Real Time

And that was right off our own coast!


The sea floor split open on April 24, 2015, but scientists had seen it coming for months.

Drawing on data from more than a dozen instruments arrayed around the underwater volcano known as Axial Seamount, they documented telltale tremors that shook its slopes. They watched the caldera at the top of the volcano swell like a balloon filling with air, building up pressure until it finally burst. They couldn't see much of the eruption that happened next — the water was too cloudy with debris — but they know that it involved plumes of super hot water and bubbles of gas and steam that popped with the explosive force of a mortar round. By the time the eruption ended a month later, nearly 88 billion gallons of molten rock had flooded ocean bottom.


Man, I could have been reporting the whole thing here, with spectro shots of the tremors and everything!


Good news is next time, I probably will, if it erupts again in my dwindling lifetime.



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