It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

I think that OCD is more often than not is a result of lack of self control and coping skills.

page: 1
8
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 12:44 PM
link   
Now, I'll concede that sometimes there may be genuine, deep mental health issues at the root of obsessive-compulsive disorder, but I have a theory that I've developed over years of observing this phenomenon.

Things happen in all of our lives that we don't like, things we can't control. Used to be that when a kid experienced something he didn't like, he just had to suck it up, deal with it, get along - cope. It seems that we have a couple of generations of special people now who have been taught from the cradle to expect the world to bend to their whims instead of learing to cope with the reality that the world doesn't always accommodate one's every demand and quirk. If something was not right, mama or daddy would make it right for them. E.g., parents who talk about how their child won't eat this or that unless the parent meets some child-established criteria.

When a child's every whim is catered to, when everything in their world is tailored to their desire and made to be the way that they demand it be, they never learn the critical life skill of coping. The mental tools for just dealing with the world as it exist never develop and the need to have their bread cut a certain way or have the raisins picked out of their cookies - and their mommy's accommodation of these stupid demands - grows into a full-blown mental issue because the adults around them catered to their whims instead of teaching them to shut up and learn how to cope with living in the real world.

(Interestingly, coping is a carpentry word. It involves cutting a piece of molding on the end, reshaping it so that it fits the piece of molding that it is to sit beside. A very good life lesson in that.





posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 12:55 PM
link   
I have to agree. Once the medical community puts an acronym on a set of behaviors, suddenly it's an external "disease" over which you have no control rather than an internal set of behaviors that is not in your own or anyone else's interest. Same with alcoholism. It;s a "disease" because the medical community says it is. So it's not your fault you're acting like an idiot. Same with ADHD. Is that a kid who can't pay attention because he's been raised on snippet TV, or is it a function of a school system that cannot deal with individual differences? I know sometimes it's a fine line and your average person does not have the skills to determine which is which. After all, sometimes there really is something physically "misfiring" in the brain that causes aberrant behavior. But you can't deny that there has been an increasing tendency to absolve people of personal responsibility by externalizing the reasons for behavior. It's not a disease; it's an excuse.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 01:02 PM
link   
When I was a kid it was called "Hyper".

No Meds needed.

Mom would backhand him...no problem



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 01:03 PM
link   
a reply to: schuyler

Alcoholism is a disease because the body is not at ease when you consume or rely on alcohol to have a stress free day.

When someone drinks to the point where their hormones are altered and repressed they no longer physically can control certain emotions with just 'thoughts' and will power alone. This is when alcoholic depression sets in. And when someone finally quits it can take literally YEARS or even severe neurological damage can happen as a result with an extreme case of lucid thoughts leading to delirium.

Although I do agree a lot of someones upbringing and childhood does effect their adult life, it's rather situational, in the case of OCD and true OCD, I don't think so.
Some people have such bad OCD they need to touch a door knob 5 times before they can turn it. Or they will experience extreme anxiety if say more than three people are in a room at once.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 01:04 PM
link   
I agree to the extent that the environment plays a key role in development. Current society has put a premium on time, making things happen often far beyond the rate of the mind to keep up. Our technology is part of the reason for short attention spans and demands for instant gratification. OCD behaviors are found reassuring in that it usually results in the desired outcome, these behaviors are then repeated as a coping mechanism.

Other environmental factors are known to include chemicals in our foods, GMO products and possibly various bands of radiation whose effects are only now being tested. We know for example that there is a 1% decrease every year in males in 1st world countries. What is causing this and what are the long-term effects?

Genetic damage may also play a part and I think it's an oversimplification to put it all on the parent-child relationship.
edit on 3-7-2017 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 01:08 PM
link   
Absolutely disagree with the above. Do you think that people with psychological disabilities get any fun out of their conditions? Do you know what it feels like to have OCD?

Once diagnosed, a person with OCD has access to therapy, and for most of them it helps alleviate their agonised existence, as well as reassure them that they are not going insane.

In the past, people with OCD didn't have this option, and they coped as best they could. But that doesn't make the suffering they went through acceptable now that treatment can be delivered.

We could use that to arbitrarily dismiss any form of treatment for any condition. Cholera? Well, kids die, let nature take its course. Amputation? They didn't have prosthetics in my day. Blind? Give 'em a tin mug and some pencils.

In terms of sheer callousness and lack of empathy, this argument is on an equal footing with "Autistic kids just need a good spanking and being told to behave."



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 01:46 PM
link   
I grew up with Tourette Syndrome, diagnosed and treated for a very short time with haloperidol, until decided I liked being me. Still have it as an adult. It was - still is - a moderate case, but I had lost of the traditional symptoms pop up. My mama never let me use that as an excuse. I was expected to deal with it and cope.

Coprolalia? Got smacked in the mouth.

Obsessive behaviour? Was made to deal with the urges.

Felt odd and unsocial because I was "different?" Told that that was the way life was and taught that I should do all I could to cope and then realize, past that, that the world would not always be accommodating to me.

I am now a fairly well adjusted adult, married 32 years, two kids, career that I enjoy and friends who tell me that once they get to know me, they don't even notice the tics and such.

I don't deny that there are extreme cases that need serious intervention, but I suspect that too often, as schuyler mention up above, we let support behavior and habits with excuses and accommodation and then get mad at the world because it does not accommodate.

Years later, as an adult, I spoke to a group of TS kids at a local TS Association meeting. Most of them were good kids. There were a couple of them who were monsters. It was clear that somebody was letting them get away with all kinds of shenanigans, using their "disability" as an excuse.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 01:47 PM
link   
From the millions of OCD sufferers: let's be glad your opinion has no bearing on medical progression in the treatment of this extremely debilitating disease.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 01:53 PM
link   
a reply to: incoserv

There's the flipside of modern day overusage too. Got a clean kitchen? OCD! Like a hygienic bathroom? OCD. Don't like guests messing your home up? OCD.

Feel a bit down in the dumps? Depressed. Headache? Migraine! Kids being kids? ADHD!



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 02:04 PM
link   
a reply to: incoserv

While I understand your idea, and to an extent I can agree with it....But I was born in the 60's and I can tell you I have a mild form of OCD. I don't like chairs to be at anything other than 90* angles to the room, and aligned perfectly. Also flatware on a table must be parallel and aligned. Silly, right? But if I don't fix it, it sticks in my mind and becomes an obsession. Just these two things. I don't have to flick lights on and off 3 times, or wash my hands every 10 minutes...but I know people that do just that. I don't take meds for my little obsessions, never felt the need to medicate over something so silly.

If you were talking about certain other "conditions" which the AMA has "invented" like ADD or ADHD, IMO those are manufactured by environmental factors, and can be treated without meds. Those were the kids we called "hyper" back in the day.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 02:13 PM
link   
It was inevitable that the indignant apologists would spring forward to defend their favorite "diseases" on this thread. It happens every time. All the acronym diseases have support groups, NGO organizations for "sufferers" and their fellow travelers, all earnestly believing that whatever malady they champion cannot POSSIBLY be the result of a character flaw, indulgence, or lack of self control. It simply MUST be an externally caused "disease" in the same category as a disease caused by bacteria or a virus. Just read some of these justification statements:


Alcoholism is a disease because the body is not at ease when you consume or rely on alcohol to have a stress free day.


Say what? That doesn't even make sense. It's semantic gibberish trying to equate "at ease" with "dis ease." Using a definition like that anything that causes you any sort of distress must be a "disease" because you are not "at ease" with the results. So getting obese can't possibly be the result of over-indulging in empty calories and putting more calories in your body that you take out in exercise. Instead, it must e a "disease" because you can't help yourself from eating cake.

I have quite a lot of sympathy for someone with Tourette's (which isn't even in the same category that we are discussing,) and very little for the alcoholic that wants to invoke the "Americans with Disabilities Act" to explain that he is a lush and shouldn't be fired. This just leads to indiscriminate leniency in things like DUIs and eventually gets innocent people killed. And what "therapy" are we talking about here? You have your "talking therapies" where some psychologist sits you down for $75 an hour so you can "talk about" how messed up you are, or some sort of medical "therapy" that amounts to drugs to slow you down so you can become functional. The only people "suffering" from OCD are the people that have to live around these people while they drive everyone else crazy. We're raising a generation of people who believe they don't need to take responsibility for their actions.




posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 02:19 PM
link   

originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: incoserv

There's the flipside of modern day overusage too. Got a clean kitchen? OCD! Like a hygienic bathroom? OCD. Don't like guests messing your home up? OCD.

Feel a bit down in the dumps? Depressed. Headache? Migraine! Kids being kids? ADHD!


People in society today do tend to throw around terms like that. Someone watches a talk show or two, or maybe a documentary, and suddenly they feel comfortable labeling things. There is a good deal of over usage of many diagnostic terms. I've even seen it occur in community based group therapy sessions. This is not meant to minimize true and relevant issues that many suffer on a daily basis though of course.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 02:32 PM
link   
Your 'theory', in the title hints at the real causality, your interpretation is dangerously ignorant.

The root of all anxiety based disorders is repressed anger or the stifling of righteous emotional expression.

The precedence is pretty simple, Say you're a young child and you leave a door open in the house. Instead of receiving the normal parental response of a quick snap of anger followed by a rational explination of why you need to shut the door, turn the light off, ect... You receive an over the top irrational show of force, anger, threats, violence or physical abuse from parents or guardians. You submit to the chaos and confusion in terror, and are then further scolded for you reaction.

These irrational double binding situations if repeated enough through anyone's life, especially a child who is wide open to suggestion and desperate for a secure grasp on the rules of reality... will cause and reinforce a hesitated stop-gap within their emotional range. One that based on the situation, suspends them in a hyper-vigilant state of anxiety that they in turn begin to cope with by way of their own mechanisms.

OCD specifically, is the perpetuation of a nervous state and belief that 'something is wrong and I need to fix it before I get in trouble." This manifests and matures through emotional unawareness often into adulthood, where the delusion is exaggerated. "I just touched the handle on a stall door in a public restroom, I need to wash my hands 97 times in the next half hour or I'm gonna die."

And as one whose brother has had OCD for these very reasons, I've got a short fuse when comes to dumb@#$ emotionally dead theories that do nothing but further propose the wickedly ignorant assumption that the suffers themselves are the cause for their weakness.

Do the world a favor and do a little research before you enlighten us all with your 'insightful' theories.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 02:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: kelbtalfenek
a reply to: incoserv

While I understand your idea, and to an extent I can agree with it....But I was born in the 60's and I can tell you I have a mild form of OCD. I don't like chairs to be at anything other than 90* angles to the room, and aligned perfectly. Also flatware on a table must be parallel and aligned. Silly, right? But if I don't fix it, it sticks in my mind and becomes an obsession. Just these two things. I don't have to flick lights on and off 3 times, or wash my hands every 10 minutes...but I know people that do just that. I don't take meds for my little obsessions, never felt the need to medicate over something so silly.

If you were talking about certain other "conditions" which the AMA has "invented" like ADD or ADHD, IMO those are manufactured by environmental factors, and can be treated without meds. Those were the kids we called "hyper" back in the day.


i have mild OCD too.
there is a pretty decent list of things i just can not cope with.
all minor in the grand scheme of things but if it is not how it should be for me i will have a major meltdown.
there is no dealing with it. i dont take meds for it i just make sure things are how they should be

little things to most people

something must be placed a certain way for example

ive left work before because i had to go home and check to make sure something was a certain way

its just not possible not to handle it

my most major issue is with time. i have a clock in every room. always have my watch on if i leave. if i decide to go around the corner to get a icee and will only be gone 5 minutes i have to have my watch.

if someone tells me(or if i tell myself) this or that will be done by a certain time and it even starts to look like it wont i start to get really anxious and agitated.
i will be 40 next march and i can not recall a single time in my life where i have been late

i do it to myself too

last week at work i was working on something and i wanted to be done by 10am. didnt have to just told myself i would be.
it started to get close so my anxiety started to rise.
i ended up finishing at 10:02 and i was pretty #ed up about it for several hours



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 02:55 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

A sense of urgency is not what it means to be a true case of OCD.
I think people use the word OCD far to loosely then they should. And that's the issue I think OP is trying to convey to us.

I am a welder by trade and when I see a weld or something that is not square by eye I freak out a little inside. But that has been ingrained my thought process because if I myself do not produce solid welds I get get 'punished' and in turn beat myself up mentally to get it right next time.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 03:08 PM
link   
a reply to: strongfp

Yes, a specific sense of urgency is not needed for OCD to be diagnosed. Below is the actual criteria, directly from the DSM-5 which is used by doctors and clinicians. Please pardon the lack of quotes etc. The post would not format properly for some reason when I tried to quote from an outside source in this instance for some reason.

----------------------------------------------------------------

DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (300.3)

A. Presence of obsessions, compulsions, or both:

Obsessions are defined by (1) and (2):

1. Recurrent and persistent thoughts, urges, or impulses that are experienced, at some time during the disturbance, as intrusive and unwanted, and that in most individuals cause marked anxiety or distress.

2.The individual attempts to ignore or suppress such thoughts, urges, or images, or to neutralize them with some other thought or action (i.e., by performing a compulsion).

Compulsions are defined by (1) and (2):

1. Repetitive behaviors (e.g., hand washing, ordering, checking) or mental acts (e.g., praying, counting, repeating words silently) that the individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession or according to rules that must be applied rigidly.

2.The behaviors or mental acts are aimed at preventing or reducing anxiety or distress, or preventing some dreaded event or situation; however, these behaviors or mental acts are not connected in a realistic way with what they are designed to neutralize or prevent, or are clearly excessive.

Note: Young children may not be able to articulate the aims of these behaviors or mental acts.

B. The obsessions or compulsions are time-consuming (e.g., take more than 1 hour per day) or cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

C. The obsessive-compulsive symptoms are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or another medical condition.

D. The disturbance is not better explained by the symptoms of another mental disorder (e.g., excessive worries, as in generalized anxiety disorder; preoccupation with appearance, as in body dysmorphic disorder; difficulty discarding or parting with possessions, as in hoarding disorder; hair pulling, as in trichotillomania [hair-pulling disorder]; skin picking, as in excoriation [skin-picking] disorder; stereotypies, as in stereotypic movement disorder; ritualized eating behavior, as in eating disorders; preoccupation with substances or gambling, as in substance-related and addictive disorders; preoccupation with having an illness, as in illness anxiety disorder; sexual urges or fantasies, as in paraphilic disorders; impulses, as in disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders; guilty ruminations, as in major depressive disorder; thought insertion or delusional preoccupations, as in schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders; or repetitive patterns of behavior, as in autism spectrum disorder).

Specify if:

With good or fair insight: The individual recognizes that obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are definitely or probably not true or that they may or may not be true.

With poor insight: The individual thinks obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are probably true.

With absent insight/delusional beliefs: The individual is completely convinced that obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are true.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 03:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Sagacity

It's a double-edged sword. Psychology in the 21st century shouldn't be like a priest class with terminology and diagnoses hidden from the public or patients. Transparency is good. On the other hand, some people take advantage and exploit it for their own ends.

Right now someone's washing their hands for the 21st time and about to go round the apartment flicking the lights 21 times. OCD. Someone else is ducking responsibility and saying, "I've got anxieties and OCD."



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 03:21 PM
link   
Good explanation.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 03:34 PM
link   
OCD and the flipside condition of being a sloppy, hoarder are both problems that family members of mine have to the max.

I sense that Toxoplasma Gondii, The Cat Brain Parasite is one part of the ongoing cause of-the-problem I have learned to tolerate over the years...
dumpster diving, neighborhood junk pile raids... are two of the ways that the 3-too-many-Dogs (yard forever full of crap piles) are being fed on the budgets of an SSI retiree and a 45 y.o. un-married daughter Its also how old couches are found to replace the ones being thrown out after one year of service in a living room that 6-8 cats and 3 dogs roam free & destroy the heart-pine T&G flooring throughout the house (except my Studio apartment section)


but hey...i'm schizo, and all this crap surrounding me is Karma...I have life discomforts and disgusting living situations to endure this time around on the reincarnation Merry-Go-Round


those of you that have to endure OCD persons in your network/family...
Quit complaining & Buck Up, even if the SnowFlakes have a feigned OCD pattern of behavior



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 03:46 PM
link   
a reply to: strongfp

i have a diagnosis and it is not just a sense of urgency

did you read the entire post?

i did not mention everything...



new topics

top topics



 
8
<<   2 >>

log in

join