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China's Second Long March 5 Rocket Launch Ends in Failure

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posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:46 AM
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Per Nasa Spaceflight's Reporting, the People's Republic of China's second launch of the Long March 5 vehicle has ended in failure. The launch occurred July 2, 2017, and was carrying an experimental heavy communications satellite called Shijian-18.

Video of the launch vehicle in flight seemed to show good separation of the boosters and first stage, so it would appear that the second stage may have caused the failure. China Global is reporting that the rocket began malfunctioning shortly after takeoff, and based on the limited technical information available, the first stage seems to have under-preformed.

The Long March 5 vehicle had a successful first launch on November 3, 2016, when it launched the Shijian 17 (which was billed as a technology demonstration satellite) to GEO. It had been scheduled to launch the Chang'e 5 lunar sample return mission in November 2017 and the Tianhe core module for China's next space station sometime in 2018 or 2019. Today's failure will in all likelihood delay those planned launches.




posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:35 AM
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The cause of the anomaly that led to the mission’s failure is being investigated by experts.

Tell them to investigate the possibility of laser attack.

Don't we have that ability by now? Who says we don't or wouldn't use it?



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 10:14 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

I can't speak to whether the capability exists or not. I also don't' know what the disintegration of a rocket brought on by a laser strike would look like, but for now, this looks more like the teething problems that are relatively common in new rockets using new engines.

Right now, it is looking like one of the two YF77 rocket engines in the Long March 5's core stage lost chamber pressure and that the core stage under-performed as a result. Some of the video is suggestive of a turbopump failure, but it's still early, and being that this is the PRC, it's unlikely they will release full details anytime soon.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Yes indeed we do.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 10:32 AM
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a reply to: MaestroMind

LOL



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: Lysergic


You must be a non believer of our secret space program which includes high energy weapons deployed as satellites. That's fine. No argument will come from me. Besides John's videos I've seen my fair share of it. Say as you will. Ignorance is not knowing is all I can say. Enjoy your darkness.
edit on 2-7-2017 by MaestroMind because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: PhloydPhan

What an awful, awful shame it failed. Rivalry between blocs put humans in space as much as science ever did. Chinese plans to land on the moon would have motivated all the others.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: PhloydPhan


I can't speak to whether the capability exists or not.


I can. Airborne lasers. Now everyone pretends they don't exist?

The failed Russian satellite launch, various Korean and now the Chinese...

Plausible and outright denial...



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 12:07 PM
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a reply to: MaestroMind


You must be a non believer of our secret space program which includes high energy weapons deployed as satellites.

Lasers from space can't penetrate that far into the atmosphere and disable launch vehicles at sea level.

However, a nearby laser in the stratosphere disguised as a civilian airliner could...

(see my last post)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 12:46 PM
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edit on 7/2/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 12:53 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: PhloydPhan


I can't speak to whether the capability exists or not.


I can. Airborne lasers. Now everyone pretends they don't exist?

The failed Russian satellite launch, various Korean and now the Chinese...

Plausible and outright denial...


The Boeing YAL-1 was sent to the boneyard and scrapped out. I know that there has been talk of putting smaller lasers on C-130s, and I understand that there are rumors that a Soviet-era fly laser testbed that was built into an IL-76 was reactivated as recently as 2009.

That said, there's no evidence a laser was involved here. Space is hard, and rockets sometimes blow up. Particularly relatively new rockets using relatively new (for the Chinese) engine technology.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 01:01 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

You misunderstood my post. For clarification I wasn't talking about lasers.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: PhloydPhan

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: PhloydPhan


I can't speak to whether the capability exists or not.


I can. Airborne lasers. Now everyone pretends they don't exist?

The failed Russian satellite launch, various Korean and now the Chinese...

Plausible and outright denial...


The Boeing YAL-1 was sent to the boneyard and scrapped out. I know that there has been talk of putting smaller lasers on C-130s, and I understand that there are rumors that a Soviet-era fly laser testbed that was built into an IL-76 was reactivated as recently as 2009.

That said, there's no evidence a laser was involved here. Space is hard, and rockets sometimes blow up. Particularly relatively new rockets using relatively new (for the Chinese) engine technology.

mmm hmmm, "Rumors", "Talk" and "scrapped programs"...

You already 'alluded' to but then distanced yourself from the cause well enough.

I didn't leave the tracks for you or others, anyway.

But what you can't disprove:

The US intel knows where when any launch is going to occur. A disguised airliner en route near there at that time could easily detect the launch (thats their job), fire an invisible laser that could "cause a loss of chamber pressure", i.e. burn thru a propellant tank or engine without being detected.

The disguised laser platform (747) would be perfect for that, wouldn't it... In fact the team aboard such a platform would take great pride in disabling the rocket as close to launch as possible, proving their prowess . Launch detection, lock on and destruction of a large rocket. After all, ICBM interdiction is one of their primary functions.

Tell it to someone else that they 'scrapped' the airborne laser program, they been working on it since at least the early 80's.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: MaestroMind
a reply to: intrptr

You misunderstood my post. For clarification I wasn't talking about lasers.

I am.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 02:33 PM
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edit on 7/2/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


Of course I ave no proof this is what occurred. Neither do you. Or do you?



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: intrptr








posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

That proves they scrapped one sample.

You prove they only built one or any others.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: PhloydPhan

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: PhloydPhan


I can't speak to whether the capability exists or not.


I can. Airborne lasers. Now everyone pretends they don't exist?

The failed Russian satellite launch, various Korean and now the Chinese...

Plausible and outright denial...


The Boeing YAL-1 was sent to the boneyard and scrapped out. I know that there has been talk of putting smaller lasers on C-130s, and I understand that there are rumors that a Soviet-era fly laser testbed that was built into an IL-76 was reactivated as recently as 2009.

That said, there's no evidence a laser was involved here. Space is hard, and rockets sometimes blow up. Particularly relatively new rockets using relatively new (for the Chinese) engine technology.

mmm hmmm, "Rumors", "Talk" and "scrapped programs"...

You already 'alluded' to but then distanced yourself from the cause well enough.

I didn't leave the tracks for you or others, anyway.

But what you can't disprove:

The US intel knows where when any launch is going to occur. A disguised airliner en route near there at that time could easily detect the launch (thats their job), fire an invisible laser that could "cause a loss of chamber pressure", i.e. burn thru a propellant tank or engine without being detected.

The disguised laser platform (747) would be perfect for that, wouldn't it... In fact the team aboard such a platform would take great pride in disabling the rocket as close to launch as possible, proving their prowess . Launch detection, lock on and destruction of a large rocket. After all, ICBM interdiction is one of their primary functions.

Tell it to someone else that they 'scrapped' the airborne laser program, they been working on it since at least the early 80's.


I'm not sure what cause you think I have "alluded" to other than a mechanical failure on either the first or second stages or possibly both.

As for "US Intel" knowing when launches happen, anyone with an internet connection or able to read a Chinese-language newspaper would have known this launch was going to happen. It's been announced for months.

If you're going to theorize about the shooting down of one nation's rockets by another country's lasers, you need to bring some better evidence.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

You're making the claim that there's more than one, so for once you prove your claim instead of expecting others top disprove it.



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