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posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

The nearest big town to me is Fayettville. The center of town has the "Market House", which was an auction house for slaves back then. It's still there, and a centerpiece of the town. It's not there to celebrate slavery, or to proudly demean the black man, it's there as a reminder of what once happened, and what should never happen again. I suspect it's not long for this world.
www.visitnc.com...




posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 10:02 PM
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How do people hold onto something that ended 150+ years ago. I suppose it means hatred is pretty strong.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 10:22 PM
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originally posted by: roadgravel
How do people hold onto something that ended 150+ years ago. I suppose it means hatred is pretty strong.


It does make you wonder why they are so offended by history now doesn't it?

Would you support the suggestion to tear down the concentration camps because Jews suddenly find them to be demeaning? What if Roma got upset by their continued existence? Or maybe what if European gays from those countries that suffered under the Nazis decided they wanted to tear down those symbols of homophobia and white supremacy and leave that to the pages of books most kids will never be allowed to learn out of?

What would you say then?



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 10:59 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: introvert

Me thinks thou dost protest too much.

If its "no big deal", why change the street names?


I don't want to change the street names. Someone else does. Ask them why they want them to be changed.

What I am saying is even if the names are changed, how does that change or erase history?

It doesn't.

It's an absurd assertion.
edit on 2-7-2017 by introvert because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: introvert
a reply to: network dude

They are street names for god's sake. Doesn't matter what you name them, it's not erasing history.


At what point would you look at this and say "hey, I think they may really be trying to remove history"?


When they actually do something to remove or change history as we know it.

Changing the name of a street does none of that.

It's the name of a street...let that sink in. It's the name of a damn street.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 11:23 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck



Slavery was not solely about race, but was always about placing a monetary value on a human.


In America it was, it was intregal. Race is the reason why Africans were choosen. And it wasnt solely economics you are wrong. The white slaves sued for inhumane treatment against their masters or ran away. the native americans either escaped or quickly succummed to disease or death due to the work.

Africana were choosen and thus, racism was born. this aint bout no money.
edit on 2-7-2017 by cenpuppie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 06:20 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Quite.

Erasing modern day fascists from the face of their nation, would be a more effective strategy.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 06:35 AM
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originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: introvert
a reply to: network dude

They are street names for god's sake. Doesn't matter what you name them, it's not erasing history.


At what point would you look at this and say "hey, I think they may really be trying to remove history"?


When they actually do something to remove or change history as we know it.

Changing the name of a street does none of that.

It's the name of a street...let that sink in. It's the name of a damn street.


Ah yes, selective quoting. the pin prick minus the pin.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 06:57 AM
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originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: introvert
a reply to: network dude

They are street names for god's sake. Doesn't matter what you name them, it's not erasing history.


At what point would you look at this and say "hey, I think they may really be trying to remove history"?


When they actually do something to remove or change history as we know it.

Changing the name of a street does none of that.

It's the name of a street...let that sink in. It's the name of a damn street.


What about when people pressured many places to no longer offer the confederate flag... (dukes of hazzard is a good example of the political pressure used)

What about removing the statues and storing them in an undisclosed location..not placing them in a museum.

What about the cities that are in a legal fight to dig up dead confederates and move their bodies because apparently a dead guy is offensive..

Or how about the changes in the history books, and the way it is taught in class that completely removes any and all mention of the other factors beyond slavery, or removes the mentions of the illegal and draconian steps taken by Lincoln from the curriculum..

We have already moved way past the point of its just a street name...



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 07:05 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

These things MUST be remembered.

In the same way as the Nazis must always be remembered, that Rome must always be remembered. Tyranny is a disease which must never be forgotten, and whose advocates must always be shunned or destroyed, depending on the threat they pose at the time. One cannot know ones enemy, by removing evidence of their existence from the record. The only way to defend against fascist and supremacist ideology, is to remember its every small detail, and crush anyone or thing whose ideology conforms to any small part of it.

The statues, the street names, the flags... they should all be remembered, and yes, the best of what the South stood for should be celebrated, but in order to defend against the worst of what it stood for, its darkside should never be forgot. You cannot protect a society from the worst excesses of its past, if you insist that it forgets them. There is no surer way to ensure that past mistakes are repeated, in fact.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

I agree... it was really eye opening for me when I went to Dachau and our guide was a 30 years and retired german soldier, whos father fought for germany during ww2.

one of the people in the groups asked how could he talk so brutally about the Nazi's when his father fought for them.. he was quick to point out that his father fought for Germany... not the Nazi's.

We in the states have forgotten that there can be many pieces of the puzzle and one piece cannot explain every conflict.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: cenpuppie


Africana were choosen and thus, racism was born. this aint bout no money.

Keep hanging on to that propaganda.


Philip Burnham, in the article "Selling Poor Steven" published in the February/March 1993 issue of American Heritage, found that in the US Census of 1830 there were 3,775 free blacks who owned 12,740 black slaves. Burnham wrote about the slave John Casor, who was denied his freedom by Black slave owner Anthony Johnson.
Source: www.ironbarkresources.com...

There are plenty more sources if you care to look.

I know it's more fun to envision a whole country of evil white guys who sat around every night laughing maniacally and trying to figure out how to torture black people. After all, that's straight out of the comic books or straight off the latest TV drama. But it's simply not true.

Slavery has existed since the dawn of mankind, and has been practiced against every race. The Biblical Law of Moses actually had restrictions on how to treat slaves. The earliest American slaves (if you discount indentured servants, who still held some rights since their slavery was time-limited) were natives... members of conquered tribes!

Wake up, son. The coffee's ready.

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 08:08 AM
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originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: introvert

Me thinks thou dost protest too much.

If its "no big deal", why change the street names?


I don't want to change the street names. Someone else does. Ask them why they want them to be changed.

What I am saying is even if the names are changed, how does that change or erase history?

It doesn't.

It's an absurd assertion.

Derp, thats why they placed the names there, to remind everyone of History. Thats why they want to change them, so people will forget.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 09:27 AM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf

originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: introvert
a reply to: network dude

They are street names for god's sake. Doesn't matter what you name them, it's not erasing history.


At what point would you look at this and say "hey, I think they may really be trying to remove history"?


When they actually do something to remove or change history as we know it.

Changing the name of a street does none of that.

It's the name of a street...let that sink in. It's the name of a damn street.


What about when people pressured many places to no longer offer the confederate flag... (dukes of hazzard is a good example of the political pressure used)

What about removing the statues and storing them in an undisclosed location..not placing them in a museum.

What about the cities that are in a legal fight to dig up dead confederates and move their bodies because apparently a dead guy is offensive..

Or how about the changes in the history books, and the way it is taught in class that completely removes any and all mention of the other factors beyond slavery, or removes the mentions of the illegal and draconian steps taken by Lincoln from the curriculum..

We have already moved way past the point of its just a street name...


I would disagree with all of those. Although, I don't see how a street name is comparable.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 09:29 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: introvert

Me thinks thou dost protest too much.

If its "no big deal", why change the street names?


I don't want to change the street names. Someone else does. Ask them why they want them to be changed.

What I am saying is even if the names are changed, how does that change or erase history?

It doesn't.

It's an absurd assertion.

Derp, thats why they placed the names there, to remind everyone of History. Thats why they want to change them, so people will forget.


Sure. Still doesn't change history.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: introvert

Add in a few doses of propaganda and you can change what people believe about history. We have plenty of examples of that already in this thread.

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck



Slavery ended in the South before it ended in New York.


Only in the sense that an Executive Order deemed it so for the traitor states in open rebellion against the United States of America. Except that that EO didn't actually end slavery in the south, for three major reason:

1) President Lincoln's Emancipation Declaration didn't end slavery anywhere. It said that current slaves in the traitorous States in rebellion on 1 January would be free. It relied on the international ancient principle of 'war booty' for its authority. So slavery wasn't ended - slaves were considered to have been confiscated as war booty and then emancipated since the new 'owner' could do whatever he wanted to do with his share of the war booty.

2) Since the those traitor States in open rebellion didn't actually recognize the Government or its President that they were rebelling against, nobody in those States paid any attention to it.

3) Furthermore according to The New York Historical Society

In 1799, New York passed a Gradual Emancipation act that freed slave children born after July 4, 1799, but indentured them until they were young adults. In 1817 a new law passed that would free slaves born before 1799 but not until 1827. By the 1830 census there were only 75 slaves in New York and the 1840 census listed no slaves in New York City.


So, are you saying that Slavery in the South was ended before 1840? I would really like to see some documentation for that.

Of course there were slaves that were imported into New York from southern states after that date, and Congress (and SCOTUS) went out of its way to ensure those monsters could maintain that vile practice with impunity even while in New York jurisdiction. Never-the-less, slavery was ended in New York by 1840.


In fact, slavery was ended everywhere in the United States at exactly the same time when the 13th Amendment was certified as approved on 18 December 1865.

edit on 3/7/2017 by rnaa because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: introvert

By itself it is a minor thing... but when you look at the overall steady assault on the history surrounding the Civil war, it is comparable.

Everything I listed has happened or is happening right now in various places in the United States, people are trying to erase or hide history to spare feelings... it is wrong.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 09:55 AM
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a reply to: rnaa

I see you know as much about American history as you do about electricity.

I like consistency.


TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck




That's right... New England. Not the South, not Carolina, not Georgia... New England. Slavery spread to the South from New England as southern plantation owners became wealthy enough to afford them.


Ah... No.

Wickham: Do you know when slavery began and ended?

Sadly, most people don't know that the first slave ship docked in Jamestown, Va., in August 1619, a year before the pilgrims dropped anchor at Plymouth Rock.


Yes, English merchants were the major culprits in transporting and selling African captives into slavery in America - especially after slavery and the trade in slaves were banned in Britain.



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