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0.5 mgs risperidone for a seven year old?

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posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: EvillerBob

We're just watching him for the weekend as we have many
times. We are seeing this kid grow up in pretty messed up
environment.




posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

In my own experience behaviour, mood, etc are situational. So he could unmedicated and fine in familiar places and situations, but introduce change (and you cannot control when that occurs) and and it can change in an instant.

Trouble is then that you need weeks for a resumed regime of medication to start being effective again.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:48 AM
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originally posted by: randyvs

My wife says his guardian dropped one of the pills on the floor
and said, " Oh sh1t don't let my cat get that, it'll kill her."
But she gives it to her grandson?

WTF is that?


Chocolate can kill dogs. It's still safe to give it to kids.

Different animals are better (or worse) at metabolizing certain compounds. In the case of chocolate, humans can easily handle theobromine but dogs can't, leading to it build up to lethal levels.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:54 AM
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originally posted by: randyvs
a reply to: EvillerBob

We're just watching him for the weekend as we have many
times. We are seeing this kid grow up in pretty messed up
environment.


Some kind of respite care I'm guessing. Good for you. I know people who have done that and it has been great for the child and their normal carers.

However, it also means that you really are not in a position to say what medicine you will or will not give him, even if you have the kid's best intentions at heart.

I know it sounds harsh but I wouldn't want you to get yourself into trouble over something that you can't fix.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: EvillerBob

Absolutely, often we took teens in on a heavy med regime and then gradually worked on individual communication and behavioural strategies and support plans etc.

Then we would look at reducing meds where appropriate and ultimately help them to live a more independent and healthy life.

Therpeutic input was a massive part of this



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:04 AM
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recommend to the parents that you have heard abilify is much better with fewer side effects. abilify will not give him breasts. it actually lowers prolactin. also abilify does not cause severe weight gain and lack of muscles. i think risperdal really reduces testosterone as well which is needed in boys and men to develop normally. also i have heard somthing that you cannot give someone under 13 or 18 risperdal not sure. somtimes though if you are not the parent, the actual parent will get really defensive with someone for telling them what to do with there kid. so i dont know how you should go about this. but i think the kid will thank you.
edit on 2-7-2017 by lizardghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:05 AM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: randyvs

Have you checked out every other avenue?

There are a host of learning issues that will cause symptoms close to ADD/ADHD in kids. We're investigating taking out 7-year-old out to a specialist in Colorado this summer to have his hearing checked. It's not that he doesn't hear, but that he had so many ear infections as a growing child that the center in your brain that allows you to filter out background noise and focus on one person talking may not have developed like it should have due to hearing impairment (fluid in the ears). Not being able to hear his teacher caused frustration which causes a kid to act out with ADD/ADHD like symptoms both because they genuinely are missing what's being said and because they're stressed out/frustrated.
Then there's the handwriting/fine motor issue which I have mentioned before which only amplified the problems.

Thing is, so many of the learning disabilities cause symptoms that mirror ADD/ADHD that really that diagnosis should be the one that is last resort or process of having eliminated everything else.

In our case, once he got out of school and started science camp this summer, his behavior has gone back to normal which means all those symptoms that might be an attentional disorder have died down to where they were before - only really an issue when he is tired.



So we aren't sure if he actually has an attention disorder that would need medication or if he just has other issues that need treatment and/or classroom accommodations that caused him to super act out last year.

So I would wonder if maybe there might be something else going on that needs to be addressed, especially if the medication doesn't address the actual problems very well or causes more problems than it's worth.


Hi, this is Randys wife. I've known this kid all his life. he is
full of life and has a huge heart. An awesome kid. His mom
was on drugs while pregnant so the doctor didnt treat the
mom properly with deliverly which caused cerebeal palsy.
He is active and has siezers. He is not depressed.
edit on Ram70217v06201700000026 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:09 AM
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a reply to: EvillerBob




I know it sounds harsh but I wouldn't want you to get yourself into trouble over something that you can't fix.


I hear you and my wife will just have to realize this.

You guys are to kool man

My wife is just going to try and persuade a second opinion for Kaden.
edit on Ram70217v13201700000014 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: lizardghost

Abilify! I'll tell the wife to keep this in mind and I
love you for your interest and time. This is such a tremendous
help because the wife and I really love this kid and just want to
help him. But I sure didn't come here looking to wave any advice.
I'm here to get some advice.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:21 AM
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originally posted by: skalla
a reply to: EvillerBob

Absolutely, often we took teens in on a heavy med regime and then gradually worked on individual communication and behavioural strategies and support plans etc.

Then we would look at reducing meds where appropriate and ultimately help them to live a more independent and healthy life.

Therpeutic input was a massive part of this


Sharing your knowledge is a blessing to both of us. Thank you.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

The truly discouraging thing is that especially if you are going through school, the focus will be on control and getting performance before it will be on what's actually best for the kid.

My sister is in a boat where they cannot afford to go independent, we barely can/really can't, but we're not going to let the school personnel get their hands on ours and slap the ADD/ADHD label on him when we know *if* that's an issue, it's not the only issue and likely not the main issue.

And my sister has her middle son stuck where he has that label and it's not the only thing wrong, but because he's got enough control through medications, support through home that he's barely scraping his grades out ... the school is content that he's "fixed" when he almost certainly has some kind of literacy issue like a dyslexia on top of his ADD/ADHD (which he honestly does have).

So unless the parent is willing and able to fight outside the system and become an expert in the laws governing what you are and are not entitled to, this is sort of what happens.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

If the kid is nuts without it it's appropriate.

It's not for you to judge what his parents are doing to control his behavior. You don't know everything about what goes on at home.

The dose sounds correct. Adults get 2 or 3 milligrams.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:29 AM
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originally posted by: randyvs
a reply to: lizardghost

It says risperidone on the bottle are they the same thing?'


Risperdal is the trade name. Risperidone is the generic.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:29 AM
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originally posted by: randyvs
a reply to: EvillerBob

We're just watching him for the weekend as we have many
times. We are seeing this kid grow up in pretty messed up
environment.





[The] kid is on a smorgasbord of pills for hyper activity and cerebral palsy siezures.




My wife refuses to give it to him and he's fine with us. She's about to go balistic.


Oh .. it is not your kid?

To be brutally honest, I do not think your wife get a say then.

Your wife is taking care of a kid who gets cerebral palsy seizures. He is given medicine presumably in accordance with the will of both his doctors and his legal guardians.

Your wife should take her concerns up with the kids doctors and guardians, but she really must respect their medical decisions for the time being.

She may have known him his whole life, but there is a world of difference to knowing someone and having sat in on doctor's consultations, having weight pros and cons as laid out by medical professionals and so on.


And even without that difference it is simply not her place.

edit on 2-7-2017 by DupontDeux because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:32 AM
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originally posted by: randyvs
a reply to: PokeyJoe

My wife refuses to give it to him and he's fine with us.
She's about to go balistic.


She has no business denying his meds. I hope his parents stop using you as babysitters.

You are interfering with a med plan designed for the boy by a team of medical specialists.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko




So unless the parent is willing and able to fight outside the system and become an expert in the laws governing what you are and are not entitled to, this is sort of what happens.


Yeah, I know what it amounts to mostly. Us sticking our
noses where they don't belong. But seeing what happens
to a kid full of life until he takes this stuff? The affects seem
liketo much. He can't even walk thru the mall. And he usually
is bouncing off the walls. IDK

I thank you Ket

edit on Ram70217v33201700000036 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: randyvs
a reply to: PorteurDeMort




They gave this to my great aunt who had Alzheimer's. Even though the contraindications said not to prescribe to elderly patients with dementia. One of the side effects is sudden death in those patients. Within 3 months, she was dead. No one should take risperidone.


You just sent chills down my spine.
My wife says his guardian dropped one of the pills on the floor
and said, " Oh sh1t don't let my cat get that, it'll kill her."
But she gives it to her grandson?

WTF is that?

Chocolate can kill your dog, are you afraid to give that too?



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:34 AM
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originally posted by: randyvs
a reply to: PorteurDeMort




They gave this to my great aunt who had Alzheimer's. Even though the contraindications said not to prescribe to elderly patients with dementia. One of the side effects is sudden death in those patients. Within 3 months, she was dead. No one should take risperidone.


You just sent chills down my spine.
My wife says his guardian dropped one of the pills on the floor
and said, " Oh sh1t don't let my cat get that, it'll kill her."
But she gives it to her grandson?

WTF is that?


Chocolate and onions are toxic to cats and dogs. You need to seriously educate yourself.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

I'm pretty sure Sharyl Attkisson dealt with this issue in the last month or two.

www.sharylattkisson.com...



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: 123143




Misquoted


I know I know, that's why I'm here!
edit on Ram70217v15201700000051 by randyvs because: (no reason given)




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