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Mandela Effect - Proof - Brenden Urie Openly Blames Song Change On Mandela Effect

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posted on Jul, 1 2017 @ 04:30 PM
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I remember once looking at the lyrics in the insert of a Japanese import of Billy Idol's "Hot in the City", and the line "Gonna move with the beat now" was rendered as "I'm a loo with a peanut."

The strange thing was, once you had read it and listened to the song, it didn't seem entirely impossible.

I'm not sure what grade of recreational substances Mr Idol can afford these days, but I'm willing to bet they're pretty good, so perhaps asking him whether he remembers writing the peanut lyric could yield interesting results.




posted on Jul, 1 2017 @ 04:39 PM
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originally posted by: audubon
I remember once looking at the lyrics in the insert of a Japanese import of Billy Idol's "Hot in the City", and the line "Gonna move with the beat now" was rendered as "I'm a loo with a peanut."


I'm not saying that "I'm a loo with a peanut" is the actual lyric of the Japanese import (or if it just a misheard lyric), but it is not uncommon for songs to have different lyrics for different markets.

A prime example is how explicit lyrics are changed in some songs for versions of the soong to be played on family-friendly radio.

One I can think of in recent times is Vampire Weekend's "Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa". The original studio version has a line:

"Do you wanna f**k, like you know I do" (with the "F-word" clearly sung)

But the "AM radio" version is

Do you wanna fly, like you know I do"

Both versions of the lyrics are right, because both are written and sung that way by Vampire Weekend.


edit on 2017/7/1 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2017 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: Box of Rain

Yeah, I can remember hearing the song "The Devil Went Down to Georgia" on the radio numerous times when growing up (for some odd reason, it was quite popular in the UK for several years) and a line towards the end always went


"I done told you once, you son of a gun, I'm the best there's ever been."


Except one day, a DJ obviously called up the wrong version from the library and listeners across the UK dropped their biscuits into their tea in shock as it was revealed that the uncensored lyric actually went: "I done told you once, you son of a bitch, I'm the (etc)"



posted on Jul, 1 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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Lots of songs gets penned down incorrectly such as the and a(h). Don't know the song though, so can't really weigh in to call everyone silly.



posted on Jul, 1 2017 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: Box of Rain

When you put it that way how can I argue.



posted on Jul, 1 2017 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

You'll find a way, of that I'm sure.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 02:47 AM
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Surely when the album art was being made the graphic designer would have received the official lyrics from the band/manager not just try to guess what they sound like.... I doubt the band would have got their own lyrics wrong :S

It doesn't make sense that he would sing "a door" because the song is about wedding guests calling the Bride a "whore" in earshot of the groom who gets upset and tells them "haven't you people ever heard of closing the Goddamned door?"



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 06:35 AM
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a reply to: Pearj

I am assuming they were joking and not being serious with their reply, so I joined in on the joke.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:00 AM
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originally posted by: Kalixi
Surely when the album art was being made the graphic designer would have received the official lyrics from the band/manager not just try to guess what they sound like.... I doubt the band would have got their own lyrics wrong :S

It doesn't make sense that he would sing "a door" because the song is about wedding guests calling the Bride a "whore" in earshot of the groom who gets upset and tells them "haven't you people ever heard of closing the Goddamned door?"




The song was insanely popular years ago. It was always the door.. its the only context that makes sense on top of that..

"Hey guys close a door to the room you are in please so no one sees." Lol.. close THE door damnit.

Of course thuh and uh.... sounds dreadfully similar..





edit on 2-7-2017 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: Reverbs

The makes sense as far as actual English, but as far as what rolls off the tongue easier it would be A .. which likely explains the lead singer saying he sings it both ways.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

Yes.

Still bothers me it's written that way though. :p


edit on 2-7-2017 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: Reverbs

Reverbs, I can't tell if your being sarcastic. Are you on the fence?



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: Pearj
a reply to: Reverbs

Reverbs, I can't tell if your being sarcastic. Are you on the fence?

Pretty sure he thinks what I think, which is not this is a ME.



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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You should let people speak for themselves.

...like the guy who wrote this song - he says it's an ME - and you argue.

I'm absolutely convinced you are more interested in arguing than the topic at hand - and therefore not really worth conversing with.



posted on Jul, 3 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: Pearj
You should let people speak for themselves.

...like the guy who wrote this song - he says it's an ME - and you argue.

I'm absolutely convinced you are more interested in arguing than the topic at hand - and therefore not really worth conversing with.

But Brendon Urie himself says he sings it both ways on different occasions -- meaning in practice, the lyric is both "a" and "the" depending what he decides to sing during a particular gig (even if the officially published lyrics are "a goddamned door"), and that we "shouldn't torture ourselves" over which way it is supposed to be.

What I gather from that whole tweet and associated responses, Urie was just messing around when he called it "ME", hoping to get a reaction. His later tweets about singing it both ways and telling people not to worry about it sort of indicates that.


edit on 3/7/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2017 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

I disagree.. To me he is plainly saying it was "the" - it changed and he can't explain the change - so it's ok to sing it either way.

In the last radio interview he flat out says it's a Mandela Effect.



posted on Jul, 30 2017 @ 09:47 AM
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a reply to: Pearj



Well isnt that something !

Well

Brandon Himself Sings the Song with Both A and THE

The "A" in the Beginning and "The" close to the End


in this Acoustic version

Panic! At The Disco - "I Write Sins Not Tragedies" ACOUSTIC (High Quality)

www.youtube.com...



posted on Jul, 30 2017 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: Wolfenz

..after it changed - which he says he didn't do - he's already said that now he sings it both ways.



posted on Jul, 30 2017 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: Pearj
In the last radio interview he flat out says it's a Mandela Effect.

So what?? Because HE said it, makes it true and validates the delusion of MElievers??

Once again, another 'pop culture' Manbela effect delusion.

Funny how the Manbela Effect only seems to affect pop culture and not science or physics or maths. Weird how it only affects things which are easy subjective targets, like the name of some children's books, or song lyrics -things very much popular in the MM and social media.

Strange how the formula for acceleration hasn't changed, or that A=πr2 is still the area of a circle.

@Pearj -- why haven't any of those things been affected? Why isn't 1+1=4? Why aren't the sciences affected by your Manbela Effect?



posted on Jul, 30 2017 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: Pearj
a reply to: Wolfenz

..after it changed - which he says he didn't do - he's already said that now he sings it both ways.


So Urie decides to goes along with some misheard lyrics istead of trying to fight those misheard lyrics. So what?

Misheard lyrics being repeated by others thinking those ARE the lyrics are an extremely common thing. There are a lot of people who hear lyrics wrong, but think they are right. Also, many people mishear some lyrics the same way (mainly because the song itself is not 100% clear).

"Feel Good Inc." by "The Gorillaz" is one good example. There are many people who think the first line of the song is "Santa's breaking down on a camel's back", when in reality it is "City's breaking down on a camel's back". Personally, I heard it as "Santa", but I knew I was most likely mishearing it, because "Santa" makes no sense. I was only sort of surprised that when I went to find the right lyrics there were many others who also heard (or I should say "misheard") it as "Santa".

Anyway, the point is that Brenden Urie simply went along with the misheard lyric. It's not a big deal, and does NOT prove that the cause for the confusion is the "Mandela Effect"....

...The idea that lyrics are commonly misheard is a perfectly reasonable explanation.

In addition, even if Urie says it is due to ME, that does not mean it is due to ME. He can think whatever he wants, but "misheard lyric being repeated by others" is still a reasonable non-ME explanation.


edit on 2017/7/30 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)




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