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The OPIOID EPIDEMIC -- Seeking Your Thoughts.

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posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 09:09 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar


I have been administered IM morphine, and prescribed a variety of old-fashioned codeine preparations. They worked fine for me.

I have also been prescribed several of the opioid class of drugs including OxyContin. They worked fine too, but I didn't care for the side effects.

So if both drugs work equally well, what will it hurt to pull those that are so easily abused? I fully understand it is a subjective experience, but I don't buy into the line that we simply cannot exist without the opioids.




posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 09:46 AM
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originally posted by: Salander
a reply to: peter vlar


I have been administered IM morphine, and prescribed a variety of old-fashioned codeine preparations. They worked fine for me.

I have also been prescribed several of the opioid class of drugs including OxyContin. They worked fine too, but I didn't care for the side effects.

So if both drugs work equally well, what will it hurt to pull those that are so easily abused? I fully understand it is a subjective experience, but I don't buy into the line that we simply cannot exist without the opioids.



Just because something "works fine for you" doesn't mean that it's the case for every patient. It depends on the type of pain and the cause thereof, it varies from one patient to another what medications work best. Some people need a long acting medication like Fentanyl or OxyContin to make their day to day lives bearable and then use smaller dose medications for breakthrough pain.

It should be up to the patient and their doctor to decide what works best for the patient, not someone on the internet who says that codeinne worked fine for them so there's no need for anything stronger on the market. Also, morphine and codeine are both opioids.

It's great that an IM injection of morphine worked for you but unless a person is on hospice and has an RN there tand administer the medication, people can't just take home a vial of morphine and jab themselves with it sonyour comparison is a very poor analogy.

Removing nature classes of medications because a minority of patients abuse them is condemning far too many people to a life's of hell because you see the situation as simply black and white. The needs of the many far outweigh the abuses of the few and it's when people are in pain and desperate that they turn to the streets when legal pharmaceutical options are no longer available. A blanket ban on specific medications is just idiotic.


ETA Some people are allergic to morphine and codeine and synthetics or semisynthetic opiates are the only options they have that are safe to take.
edit on 3-8-2017 by peter vlar because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 05:30 PM
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We can go back and forth on this topic. Some people are prone to addiction, some docs may be a bit generous as well with the meds. Some people are weak, some are just plain bad etc etc

The bottom line is that people are dying and we have an moral and ethical obligation to help them........... Not only that individual addiction is like a social wrecking ball in terms of family and society. And this is no longer a "ghetto" issue, its hitting EVERYWHERE.

We need to bandaid the situation with tighter controls on meds, stop acting like pot is the same as heroin, and provide narcan injectors in the community much like an AED

Then we need to fix the problem with REAL MENTAL healthcare, education etc.



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

" The OPIOID EPIDEMIC "

Federal Intelligence Agencies Conspiring to Hook Millions of American People on Hard Drugs by Allowing the Protected Import of said Illicit Drugs while Contributing to their Black Budgets . Been going On since the 1950's.........



posted on Aug, 3 2017 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: FredT
We can go back and forth on this topic. Some people are prone to addiction, some docs may be a bit generous as well with the meds. Some people are weak, some are just plain bad etc etc

The bottom line is that people are dying and we have an moral and ethical obligation to help them........... Not only that individual addiction is like a social wrecking ball in terms of family and society. And this is no longer a "ghetto" issue, its hitting EVERYWHERE.

We need to bandaid the situation with tighter controls on meds, stop acting like pot is the same as heroin, and provide narcan injectors in the community much like an AED

Then we need to fix the problem with REAL MENTAL healthcare, education etc.



I totally agree that we need to stop treating cannabis like Heroin, we need to increase treatment options for people who want help, we need naloxone/narcan to be easily available and see much more. But how much tighter can we get with prescription controls? I have to be able to drive 40 min on less than 24 hours notice for pull counts and random urinalysis to make sure I'm taking the medications that I am prescribed and not dovert Big them for cash. I've had my prescriptions reduced recently because of state guidelines that puts legislators in charge of my medical needs and not the doctors who treat me and see me every 30 days. I pay out the ass for prescriptions, I pay for urinalysis because my insurance doesn't cover it, I lose hours out of a day to drive down, wait, take a drug test, get my pills counted and drive home and it costs Ken money for gas. I have sever chronic issues that I've been treated for for a decade and a half and suddenly I'm treated like a junkie off the street because other people can't be responsible for themselves or because somehow my prescriptions (not mine specifically, the same types and similar dosages) have led to other people to OD. Why am I punished when I have proven time and time again that I am nothing but compliant. All because when I was in high school I thought it would be really awesome to join the Army and jump out of planes to honor, protect and defend our Constitution. It's a hell of a thanks I'm getting when I have done absolutely nothing wrong or illegal.



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

No, morphine and codeine are not opioids, because when morphine and codeine were first brought into use, in the English language the word opioid did not exist, was not in use. Man had not yet coined that term. That is, in my 1976 Websters New Twentieth Century dictionary, the word opioid cannot be found. Nor in my son's 1986 Webster
Collegiate can the word be found.



The simple answer is they were called opiates. That word has existed for a long time. Opioid is only a recently used term, as the drug is a recently synthesized drug, designed for effect one might say.
edit on 5-8-2017 by Salander because: Simple answer



posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

My first reaction? 'They' are blowing this out of proportion to civer up how many lives are lost in and out of the hospital on prescribed drugs/chemo/etc - that are not opioids.

peace



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 06:34 PM
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originally posted by: silo13
a reply to: carewemust

My first reaction? 'They' are blowing this out of proportion to civer up how many lives are lost in and out of the hospital on prescribed drugs/chemo/etc - that are not opioids.

peace


Still, I think it's noteworthy that the White House's Opioid Commission, headed by NJ Gov Chris Christie is suggesting that the President declare a national state of emergency.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 06:52 AM
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originally posted by: Salander
a reply to: peter vlar

No, morphine and codeine are not opioids, because when morphine and codeine were first brought into use, in the English language the word opioid did not exist, was not in use. Man had not yet coined that term. That is, in my 1976 Websters New Twentieth Century dictionary, the word opioid cannot be found. Nor in my son's 1986 Webster
Collegiate can the word be found.



The simple answer is they were called opiates. That word has existed for a long time. Opioid is only a recently used term, as the drug is a recently synthesized drug, designed for effect one might say.


You're only point is to argue the semantics of etymology based on dictionaries that only include words in common, everyday use? The term opioid has been used for far longer in medical dictionaries since you want to split hairs.


Yes, originally, opioid was used for synthetic and semisynthetic medications like oxycodone (the active ingredient in OxyContin) Demerol and others of a synthetic or semisynthetic nature derived from another sportiest of poppy within the Papiver Genus. But today, and for decades and opioid is any drug that acts on the opiate centers in the brain. Some are agonists, others like naloxone, are opioid antagonists. And again, you're focusing on word etymology as a distraction from not having a valid argument to the legitimacy of the rest of my post. Different people respond to different medications and some people are Allergic to opiates like Morphine. Yes, Morphine is an opiate burnopioid is any drug that acts on those specific centers of the brain. Removing entire classes of medications based on what worked for you is just ignorant. A basic rule of thumb is that all opiates ar opioids but not all opioids are opiates. To put it in simplistic terms, Amy drug that acts on the brains opiate receptors is an opioid. But only medications derived from Palpver Somniferum are opiates. Hope that helps.

For further reading-
en.m.wiktionary.org...

medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com...

www.fda.gov...

en.m.wikipedia.org...

www.drugs.com...



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar


Yes, shame on me for getting into semantics.

I do understand and have no problems with the evolution of language. It is a fact of life. In some contexts "bad" can really mean "good".

But the fact is that before there were opioids, there were opiates. You may change the meanings of words if that's what suits you, and I will consider that in any future communications.

Synthetic opioids are different than the more organic opiates, whether you prefer to blur the meanings between words or not.



posted on Aug, 8 2017 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar


Take a moment to consider the function of suffices in the English language.

Note that "-oid" is defined as 1) Having the appearance of: RESEMBLING or 2) One that resembles something specified or has a specified quality. An example is humanoid. Not human, but resembling human.

Thus opioid, not opium but resembling opium



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