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Loch Ness monster spotted? Tourists' photo sparks debate

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posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 06:15 AM
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a log, a gd log. a gd log with a branch that long.




posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 06:51 AM
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And with one dubious snap, the Loch's continuing popularity as a lucrative tourist attraction is assured.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Not Loch Ness Monster



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 09:48 AM
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If it was any other lake, nobody would look twice. Tree branch for sure.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 03:20 PM
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I think you may be right. There are not many monsters that have leaves.
a reply to: BlueAjah



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 03:26 PM
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Ah, "the Loch Ness lobster", as my younger brother used to call it.
Loch Ness has an outlet in the Ness river, which leads to the sea (in a controlled way, because it is all part of the Caledonian Canal system). So geography says there ought to be a slight current, heading north.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: Sublimecraft
Well, if it's not a piece of thread disguised as a mermaid, it's a log that's a monster.

Either way - these 2 are LESS fake news than all the TV's put together.

I am inclined to be suspicious that the mermaid and monster are working together to # us all up.



I lost it here.


Its string shaped by mermaids to show us to never stop believing



posted on Jun, 30 2017 @ 09:46 PM
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The origin of the monster (first sighting) is really a good read. WP has a great history of it :

First sighting



Saint Columba (year: 565)
The earliest report of a monster in the vicinity of Loch Ness appears in the Life of St. Columba by Adomnán, written in the sixth century AD.[15] According to Adomnán, writing about a century after the events described, Irish monk Saint Columba was staying in the land of the Picts with his companions when he encountered local residents burying a man by the River Ness. They explained that the man was swimming in the river when he was attacked by a "water beast" which mauled him and dragged him underwater. Although they tried to rescue him in a boat, he was dead. Columba sent a follower, Luigne moccu Min, to swim across the river. The beast approached him, but Columba made the sign of the cross and said: "Go no further. Do not touch the man. Go back at once."[16] The creature stopped as if it had been "pulled back with ropes" and fled, and Columba's men and the Picts gave thanks for what they perceived as a miracle.....MORE at WP[16]


We are talking 1452 years ago, which is quite impressive. The idea that more than one exists, and procreation would be absolutely required to take the sightings up to today.




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