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What makes a criminal mind?

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posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 12:42 AM
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Or what is your perception of a criminal? Do you throw all criminals on
the same fire? Or do you consider what's wrong with our correctional
institutions, to possibly be the afore mentioned. Or is okay to toss non
violent criminals in with violent criminals and divide them with different
yard levels on the inside?

Do you even realize the only criminals in prison are the ones that got
caught? The rest, violent or not, have either achieved their goal, or are
still working on it. And for most, that goal is two fold consisting of
both money and power. And the ones that reach their goal, you can't
even recognize for what they truly are. But they're still criminals whether
they were caught or not.

But the fact that they haven't been caught I guess just allows for a
more pleasant illusion does it not? You might spit on any criminal in prison
violent or not. But would at the same time sit down to dinner with a ruth
less violent murderer who out smarted the whole system. Of course you
may not know of a persons violent or otherwise criminal exploits. Or would
you?

Here's a piece about the criminal mind.



The criminal mind On the outside, violent offenders come in all shapes, sizes, colors and ages. But on the inside, research finds that they may share some traits. Here’s a look at some of the biological risk factors psychologists and others have linked to violence — and the interventions they’re testing to reduce that risk. February 2014, Vol 45, No. 2 Print version: page 39 On the outside, violent offenders come in all shapes, sizes, colors and ages. But on the inside, research finds that they may share some traits. Here's a look at some of the biological risk factors psychologists and others have linked to violence — and the interventions they're testing to reduce that risk. Brain structure and function The amygdala — a part of the brain involved in fear, aggression and social interactions — is implicated in crime. Among the research that points to this link is a neuroimaging study led by Dustin Pardini, PhD, of the University of Pittsburgh. His team found that 26-year-old men with lower amygdala volumes were more than three times more likely to be aggressive, violent and to show psychopathic traits three years later than men of the same age with more normal-sized amygdalas — independent of factors including history of violence and social background (Biological Psychiatry, 2013). Other research, such as an fMRI study led by psychologist Andrea Glenn, PhD, of the University of Alabama, suggest that amygdala functioning — not just size — is also more likely to be reduced among those with psychopathic tendencies (Molecular Psychiatry, 2009). At least one study indicates that such deficits may appear long before people commit crimes. Adrian Raine, DPhil, of the department of criminology at the University of Pennsylvania, led a study with Yu Gao, PhD, at CUNY-Brooklyn that examined fear conditioning, which is dependent on amygdala function, in a group of 1,795 3-year-olds. The researchers put electrodes on the children's fingers while repeatedly playing two tones: one that was followed by a loud, unpleasant sound and another that was played alone. Subsequently, the difference in sweat responses to each tone by itself yielded a measure of each toddler's fear conditioning. Twenty years later, the team identified participants who had gone on to commit crimes and compared them with noncriminal counterparts, matching them on gender, ethnicity and social adversity. They found that those children who went on to commit crimes had "simply failed" to demonstrate fear conditioning, Raine says. In other words, they were fearless when most of us would be fearful. This finding suggests that deficits in the amygdala, which are indirectly identifiable as early as age 3, predispose to crime at age 23 (The American Journal of Psychiatry, 2010). The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which plays a major role in behavior regulation and impulsivity, has also been linked to crime. Psychologist Kent Kiehl, PhD, and colleagues at the University of New Mexico used fMRI to look at the brains of nearly 100 adult male inmates while they completed a cognitive task involving inhibitory control. They found that prisoners with lower ACC activity were twice as likely to reoffend four years after they left prison than prisoners with higher ACC activity (PNAS, 2013). While such studies need replication and extension, Raine says, they are "proof of the concept that there may be added value with bringing on board neurobiological information, including brain imaging information, for future prediction of violence."


Here's the source

Notice how they use the term prisoner and inmates.

I think we need some study and education on how we perceive criminals.

Would you ever think of a psychologist as a criminal? How about a judge? A sheriff?

Is it smart to assume anything in this day and age?


edit on Ram62617v45201700000031 by randyvs because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 12:51 AM
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Some criminals get caught over and over...and never go to prison, due to having friends in high places, or mental issues.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 12:55 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

One word. Charles Manson.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 01:14 AM
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A criminal is one that commits a crime. A crime is an act that is considered wrong by an authority. That authority is based on a complex and ever changing system of public opinions (laws)

so I would say that anyone that doesn't give authority to public opinions of right and wrong would have a criminal mind.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: Notably0ffbeat




so I would say that anyone that doesn't give authority to public opinions of right and wrong would have a criminal mind.


That's pretty damn good right there.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: AngelicIRage




One word. Charles Manson.


I assume you meant one name? Is that where you set the bar?



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 01:39 AM
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Some people are true psychopaths I know one.

Very bad people who should be shot IMO.

Other criminals are severely damaged and stuck in a perpetual cycle due to their broken psyche and a judicial system that does more damage than good.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 01:40 AM
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originally posted by: Notably0ffbeat
A criminal is one that commits a crime. A crime is an act that is considered wrong by an authority. That authority is based on a complex and ever changing system of public opinions (laws)

so I would say that anyone that doesn't give authority to public opinions of right and wrong would have a criminal mind.


Did Otto Warmbier have a "criminal mind"? North Korea thought he did. Maybe a "criminal mind" is defined by the authority in control of the location where you commit the "crime"? Punishment for any given "crime" varies greatly from country to country as well.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 01:43 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

Have you ever heard the term, "Publish or Perish"? Many resident professors are REQUIRED to publish articles. white papers, and a book or two every so often otherwise they can/will be replaced with one that does making the smartest people in their field writing about NEW THEORIES from one study or even more and with "their" approach makes it a fact.... and here is the error in science.

edit on 26-6-2017 by DeathSlayer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 01:48 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

If a psychologist, sheriff or judge broke the law, and was duly convicted of their crime, I could very easily think of or refer to them as criminals. Because at that point it is an accurate description.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 01:52 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

While the commonality of some psychological traits may be accurate, it is not indicative of everyone with said traits. Correlation does not equal causation.
This article reminds me vaguely of phrenology for some reason.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 02:25 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

I know of dis people not good. No moral and try to hurt others and reputation. Ma friend went thru dis and i lose respect for them who wish harm on da people.

Mon i not know what wrong with people dis days day so evil and need much help.

I thank you



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 03:12 AM
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a reply to: randyvs

A criminal mind is basically a mind state that feels it can break any law without persecution.

It astonishingly is used at times more or exercised best by some who make the laws.

Ex- When LORD JESUS CHRIST was said to of walked amongst mankind over 2 millennia ago he was basically labeled a criminal by the Roman Empire back then that controlled the laws.
Labeled criminal the Son of GOD, for not doing what the Romans wanted which was to stop enlightening mankind.
Because the Romans knew it would make it harder for laws they were breaking themselves to continue to control the people they controlled if those people became wiser... So the Romans Crucified CHRIST for breaking their laws.

Yet they were said to of had gladiator games and even would sacrifice people to animals in arenas for entertainment (criminal minded)

Fast forward a few years and across the pond there was a time jim crow laws existed to keep people oppressed segregated and in consistent conscious down spiral. Jim crow laws that were based on color. And if you were the wrong color or race as humans prefer to label themselves back then the laws did not apply the same to you.
You could be hung or shot to death and or see hear the females of your family being raped for being the wrong color.
And it was all legal... Because legal papers representing the law classified those people as property and not actual CREATOR Creations that had natural rights as beings of this planet...
So basically if you were in love with someone of the different ethnicity or wrong color or race (wrong by human standards) it could of been an immediate death sentence or long prison sentence. Not because it was wrong but because some who felt they had the right over others life making laws back then felt it was going against the grain.

Which is what I mean about, it astonishingly is used a criminal mind at times more or exercised best by some who make the laws...
Think about Nk laws and how they keep those people under control oppressed.
They the oppressed people and or their families there can actually face fire squad or long prison terms in what seem to be modern concentration camps for simply speaking out loud against their dictator, who can break all the laws he wants? (criminal minded)

So to reiterate a criminal mind to 1 is basically a mind state of a being or beings that feel it/they can break any law without persecution.



edit on 6/26/17 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 05:42 AM
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I'd imagine resentment and being a product of their environment from a young age could possibly be a couple of the numerious reason a criminal mind is born. You hear everyone shout these days about bullies and shaming them, but what if the bully is beat at home and then emotionally scared with, words like a love you in the same breath but never talks about it? Is he/she still wrong since that's how they perceive love to be. Same with the criminal who steals, is he/she wrong for taking from a source with plenty when they have nothing in a system that won't provide the help. It's easy for a judge high up in his/her seat in their well off lives to cast the law down on a broken person. Perception has a lot to answer for. Granted some peoples action are hard to explain but just like animals I'm sure people stuck on a rock floating in space with nowhere to go feel trapped and give up at times, so f*** it is a constant thought. A criminal can be made from someone not putting sugar in anothers coffee, killing the barista. That couldve been a long line of actions that broke the camels back, like a lion who turns on the lion tamers after years of the small whips.
As someone said above it's all down to public opinions and preceptions of the law. Another example, sorry haha. If someone went around killing all the peadophiles they found, would he/she be a hero to society as 90% of peadophiles will reoffend or are they deemed an evil person and deserve life in jail? What if someone kills your child in a cold act, are you a criminal for seeking justice that you deem right yet outside the perimeters of the law?
It's all perception and i guess in that moment you need to be that person to understand their actions whether malicious or justified in their own heads. Wrongs can always be rights depending the shoes you're wearing.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 05:50 AM
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Its probably not that complicated. What makes a criminal mind is the culture in which they are brought up. First - family, and then every one else they are exposed to. The principles of the parents and the people they are around are passed down.

Like I have an aunt who was a con artist and would borrow money from people and never return it. Her son turned out to be the same way. I think it be no coincidence.



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 06:35 AM
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originally posted by: AngelicIRage
a reply to: randyvs

One word. Charles Manson.



Ummm...One word...genetics...


YouSir



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 07:48 AM
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Not all psychopaths are violent evil people. Just the ones who have a weak mind that can't control it.

You people have absolutely no idea how many times you have walked by or interacted with one. Awe look, your still here.

Just stop with the senseless fear. There's fear. Then there's ignorant.

Most are very ignorant. Those are the people I don't trust.
edit on 26-6-2017 by ConscienceZombie because: silly little typos



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 10:12 AM
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originally posted by: DeathSlayer
a reply to: randyvs

Have you ever heard the term, "Publish or Perish"? Many resident professors are REQUIRED to publish articles. white papers, and a book or two every so often otherwise they can/will be replaced with one that does making the smartest people in their field writing about NEW THEORIES from one study or even more and with "their" approach makes it a fact.... and here is the error in science.


I have to admit Idk that! But that is very interesting indeed. Hmmm....



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 10:22 AM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13




So to reiterate a criminal mind to 1 is basically a mind state of a being or beings that feel it/they can break any law without persecution.


Wow you summed up what I was driving at in superb fashion and
better than I ever could have.
edit on Ram62617v32201700000042 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: Chillman




I'd imagine resentment and being a product of their environment from a young age could possibly be a couple of the numerious reason a criminal mind is born. You hear everyone shout these days about bullies and shaming them, but what if the bully is beat at home and then emotionally scared with, words like a love you in the same breath but never talks about it? Is he/she still wrong since that's how they perceive love to be. Same with the criminal who steals, is he/she wrong for taking from a source with plenty when they have nothing in a system that won't provide the help. It's easy for a judge high up in his/her seat in their well off lives to cast the law down on a broken person. Perception has a lot to answer for. Granted some peoples action are hard to explain but just like animals I'm sure people stuck on a rock floating in space with nowhere to go feel trapped and give up at times, so f*** it is a constant thought. A criminal can be made from someone not putting sugar in anothers coffee, killing the barista. That couldve been a long line of actions that broke the camels back, like a lion who turns on the lion tamers after years of the small whips. As someone said above it's all down to public opinions and preceptions of the law. Another example, sorry haha. If someone went around killing all the peadophiles they found, would he/she be a hero to society as 90% of peadophiles will reoffend or are they deemed an evil person and deserve life in jail? What if someone kills your child in a cold act, are you a criminal for seeking justice that you deem right yet outside the perimeters of the law? It's all perception and i guess in that moment you need to be that person to understand their actions whether malicious or justified in their own heads. Wrongs can always be rights depending the shoes you're wearing.


Holy crap you guys? There are some awesome answers here.



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