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One hundred and six degrees in apple valley ca. and hailing?

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posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 08:48 PM
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I kid you not. I was outside maybe an hour ago in the sweltering
heat. And it started hailing for a short time. Now I know this isn't
like rocks falling out of the sky or some big phenomena. But I'm
really intetrested in some of the minds here that I know can explain
this scientifically for me. Cause I'm lmao at the wife right now.
She's all freaked out.





posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

Pics or it never happened?



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 08:54 PM
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All hail is breaking loose over there.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 08:57 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

Instability in the lower atmosphere, cold air in the upper atmosphere. The larger hail makes it to the ground, the smaller hail doesn't.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: NewzNose

I could take some pics of some water vapor rising up
off our heated asphalt approachless desert driveway.
But as you might surmise the little ice speckles weren't
hang'n around to long.

Oh hell look pal you're just gonna have to take my word on this
one for rice sakes!


Wait I just looked outside and there are some tiny white rocks
I could pass off as hail?

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edit on Rpm62417v03201700000032 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 08:58 PM
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Not an expert but I live in a city that has very hot summers, the best storms and biggest hailstorms are always in the summer months. I have sweltered through many days above 100 degrees only for a storm to come in and rain hail down. I imagine convection plays a part.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:02 PM
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Just means the heat is at the surface... the air up inside the storms is below freezing.

That's actually pretty normal. As a cold front moves in quickly, the hotter air in front of it can get trapped, which causes the air to mix violently. Hot air at the surface is trying to rise, cold air above is trying to sink, and you get a storm. If it's got enough energy, you also get hail and tornadoes.

Been a while since we saw triple digits here. We used to get them for about a week a year in August, but that hasn't happened in the last 5 years at least.

TheRedneck



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
a reply to: TheRedneck



Thanks to Zaph and Red my wife is starting to calm down now.
Shes a blast.

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posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:08 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

We stopped in Coachella the other day and Boron today. It was 115 both days.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

Could of been some pee droplets from an airplane.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:12 PM
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originally posted by: thesaneone
a reply to: randyvs

Could of been some pee droplets from an airplane.


You're just try'n to freak my wife out again aren'tcha?



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:14 PM
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originally posted by: randyvs

originally posted by: thesaneone
a reply to: randyvs

Could of been some pee droplets from an airplane.


You're just try'n to freak my wife out again aren'tcha?





Not me.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:14 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

All you need is high cloud tops.

Hail is raindrops that got caught in an updraft and lifted up high in the cloud until they froze. They fall again and pick up a coating of water, but get caught in the updraft and lifted up to freeze again, but this time a bit bigger because of the new coat of water. This process repeats until the resulting hailstone gets too big for the updraft to keep pushing back up in the cloud top and the hail stone falls.

The best way for hail to form is for there to be a strong mesocyclone in a storm, usually in a rotating storm or supercell. That's why you often hear so many reports of large hail with reports of tornados. All a tornado is is the mesocyclone that got tilted up and down rather than horizontally inside the storm.

We get lots of these in the spring and early summer and then another round in the fall out on the plains.


It starts when you get competing air masses - hot and cold - so no, it's not unusual at all to have a very, very hot day and then get a situation with hail.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Thanks Ket I'll have the wifee read that.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

First time I ever saw Vegas it was 116 degrees... opening the truck door to get fuel was like opening an oven!

But it's a dry heat...


TheRedneck



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

We just fueled in Lake Havasu City. Black parking lot, hot day, lots of hot engines and exhaust under the truck. Truck sensor read 123 when I pulled forward after fueling.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 09:56 PM
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Living Dallas Tx. Area way back had 100 degrees around Christmas and Tornado hit Garland one of the suburbs.

Right after that was two-three week record cold snap that broke watermains all over DFW area.

100 degrees one day and 5 degree overnight Temps immediately after that.

Saw lots of freaky weather when living there.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 10:01 PM
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originally posted by: Phoenix
Living Dallas Tx. Area way back had 100 degrees around Christmas and Tornado hit Garland one of the suburbs.

Right after that was two-three week record cold snap that broke watermains all over DFW area.

100 degrees one day and 5 degree overnight Temps immediately after that.

Saw lots of freaky weather when living there.


I think it's a common saying all over the midwest/plains that if you don't like the weather, wait for 30 seconds.


My freshman season in track & field in high school, almost every meet we had would start out either very pleasant to downright hot and then go crappy in the space of a few minutes to a few hours. There was a one where it was actually sleeting on us by the end.

By the end of the season, every single kid on the team had adopted an extra large track bag (more like a suitcase duffle) that we called a coffin bag and packed it to overflowing with extra sweats and jogging suits and blankets ... just in case. Everyone else looked at us like we were crazy because we looked like we were moving in every time we left the bus. But we learned the hard way to always come prepared.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 10:27 PM
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We live in California. It hailed a week and a half ago real hard, but it wasn't hot. It is real hot here this week. I saw 109. Our air conditioner broke down, and has to be ordered. We got a portable one to keep us alive for now



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 10:38 PM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

Ours is broken too! I been taken two cold showers a day.
And I used to take one a week whether I needed one or not.







 
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