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Reflection? Space debris?... making a weird turn on the BulgariaSat-1 stream

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posted on Jun, 23 2017 @ 09:39 PM
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Hello ATS,

I'm pretty sure this is nothing, but I can't come up with a good explanation for the weird change in direction at the 26th minute mark in the video.

I had to wait for the stream to end to see it properly, so now that I've done this, I'm thinking about a small particle of debris that was blown at the last moment out of the camera view from some sort of exhaust, or lens flare/lighting effect (one could notice the lighting on a few of the visible details change at that moment) but am sure the change of direction is a bit strange. I'm more inclined towards debris from these two options, because it seems to be rotating but then again, tiny aliens in a tiny rotating saucer. Who would've thought.



The angle is still bizarre for me though... so...

Looking forward to your thoughts.
edit on 23-6-2017 by ch1n1t0 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 23 2017 @ 10:45 PM
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Ok I watched it does look like debris or ice .
It's clearly in front of the motor from the camera 's
perspective.
The angle change could be
because of the blast from the rocket .
I suspect even an idling rocket motor
can exert that force.



posted on Jun, 23 2017 @ 11:13 PM
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Again with the "cut out" landing video? You telling me they don't have more than one video source for monitoring the landing of a rocket project that costs millions? In case a malfunction or it crashed, wouldn't they want as many angles as possible for investigation? Even for "Bad Ass" documentation? Xgames has like 20 cameras just for a dude on a board pulling a 720°. What a let down. Looks CG anyway...



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 12:45 AM
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I agree. The thruster could have stayed low thrust and it kicked the object.

There's also a weird glitch at 40:50. Its was like his software was predicting the wrong path of the second stage for a moment.

Now the over thinking.

Since the camera isn't on the craft between 24:47-41:26. That's a long time... I watched the whole thing lol. I had a Carl Sagan moment while looking at the CGI render of the Earth.

Except at 27:33 and 27:53. The glitch in question shows stage two at the location when we lose it at 27:58. Also at a southerner longitude (I hope that sounds right). The Alt is 233km when we see it again for the burn. If this isn't a glitch what if it read the wrong object for a moment? Like they let go of something.

I don't know. You can do a lot of bad things up there. Or good, depending on how you want to look at it.

I don't think it could be reading a different craft like aliens. The software I'm assuming can only read the rocket its told to look at. Aliens wouldn't want or need Elon's outdated software. So I don't see an interference with that. Its a big glitch. Or little. Not an expert.

That freeze frame for the landing was very disappointing. Reminds me of the classic disappearing elephant magic trick.

edit on 24-6-2017 by ConscienceZombie because: silly little typos

edit on 24-6-2017 by ConscienceZombie because: added and subtracted



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 01:11 AM
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a reply to: ch1n1t0

this reminds me of the nasa tether incident,

video editing added after effect of flight path trails so its easier to see the turns the objects are making, can see that at 3:46

nasa's official explanation is they are ice particles, there was no explanation given for the fact they make their own turns/path corrections, the only explanation ive ever heard for that was from some ats poster here said they were probably getting pushed around by the jets of the ship when it course corrects, personally i dont think that explanation holds water with the slow arching turns these objects made,


someone should ad some path tracking to the object in the op video as well, cause im not really seeing this turning you are mentioning, it looks like its moving in a straight line.
edit on 24-6-2017 by NobodiesNormal because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 07:26 AM
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wast of time the partials are very small .
so not alien ships . No life in space so not space bugs .
whats left O yea ice



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 07:32 AM
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originally posted by: ch1n1t0


Hello ATS,

I'm pretty sure this is nothing, but I can't come up with a good explanation for the weird change in direction at the 26th minute mark in the video.

I had to wait for the stream to end to see it properly, so now that I've done this, I'm thinking about a small particle of debris that was blown at the last moment out of the camera view from some sort of exhaust, or lens flare/lighting effect (one could notice the lighting on a few of the visible details .



Woow..gee...did you think that one into existence or did you already read it somewhere ?

Sounds a bit familiar...



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: MarioOnTheFly

What are you unto, mossieur? Much rude? So wow.

Ontopic:

UnderKingsPeak - yep, I posted mostly to get a second point of view and it sounds reasonable there was a rocket blast that caused this to happen. I thought of the angle to be funny, but it is space and things behave pretty differently.

ConsciousZombie, that graph is just what I was looking for, thanks!
edit on 24-6-2017 by ch1n1t0 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: NobodiesNormal

In space, above the atmosphere, a rocket's blast must be directly upon the impacted object. Not like, say, a car whizzing by you as you stand by the road and feel the deflected wind. In space the particles from the exhaust MUST impact upon the object to cause it to lose its former motion.



posted on Jun, 24 2017 @ 01:37 PM
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It pulsates throughout it's travel.
spinning object ?

b



posted on Jul, 23 2017 @ 11:52 PM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: NobodiesNormal

In space, above the atmosphere, a rocket's blast must be directly upon the impacted object. Not like, say, a car whizzing by you as you stand by the road and feel the deflected wind. In space the particles from the exhaust MUST impact upon the object to cause it to lose its former motion.

um, whats your point? if anything that only makes it even more unlikely a path change could be due to rocket exhaust, such an event would cause a sudden sharp change in path, not slow arching turns, slow arching turns are more in line with intelligent pathing control.



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