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Native American canoe foundon the Red River La. by boaters

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posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 04:45 PM
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This is a fantastic find,

A Native American dugout canoe was discovered by local boaters on the Red River north of Shreveport two weeks ago. They reported the find to Wildlife and Fisheries who contacted the Division of Archaeology concerning the find. After Dr. Chip McGimsey, State Archaeologist, had secured landowner permission, Dr. Jeff Girard visited the discovery. He recorded the canoe which is 10.2 meters or 33 feet long and 90 cm or almost 3 feet wide. That was one big tree! A wood sample has been sent for radiocarbon testing to get an exact age and confirm Jeff’s belief that the canoe is Native American.




Its a big one too












Today, the canoe is being removed from the bank. The landowners have donated the canoe to the State. Texas A&M has agreed to store the dugout until we can start the conservation process. The dugout will be displayed locally once the conservation process is complete.


Louisiana Office of Cultural Development

Canoes do not survive well. This is a truely awsome find.




posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10
They should have some rollers underneath it.
I wonder how many pieces it is in now.
Great find, SnF!


edit on V012017Wednesdaypm30America/ChicagoWed, 21 Jun 2017 17:01:26 -05001 by Violater1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Id like to know what kind of wood it is...that could explain its not rotting. For instance black locust doesnt rot even wet, and I imagine old growth would be even stronger.

Epay(spelling) has similar attributes to locust, but its from S. America, which could be intriguing as well.

Great find.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 05:17 PM
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A canoe maker once said, when asked how he makes canoes:

" You start with a tree, then remove everything that is not a canoe"



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: punkinworks10

Id like to know what kind of wood it is...that could explain its not rotting. For instance black locust doesnt rot even wet, and I imagine old growth would be even stronger.

Epay(spelling) has similar attributes to locust, but its from S. America, which could be intriguing as well.

Great find.




I want to know what kind of wood it is as well, I dont know much about the arboreal scene in the river south, knowing what kind of wood it is could be very enlightening.
It is of similar size and shape to carribean/gulf of mexico voyaging canoes, and there is plenty of evidence showing extensive trade with the gulf coast of mexico in La.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Agreed.
I have a number of working theories regarding the Native American cultures of Central and S. America and Central and Southern North America. Im certainly not alone in that regard, but your musings triggered some of my thoughts on the matter when you mentioned the Carribean.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 07:49 PM
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Shouldn't that be put in a Native American Museum somewhere?



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 09:24 PM
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originally posted by: punkinworks10
This is a fantastic find,

A Native American dugout canoe was discovered by local boaters on the Red River north of Shreveport two weeks ago. They reported the find to Wildlife and Fisheries who contacted the Division of Archaeology concerning the find. After Dr. Chip McGimsey, State Archaeologist, had secured landowner permission, Dr. Jeff Girard visited the discovery. He recorded the canoe which is 10.2 meters or 33 feet long and 90 cm or almost 3 feet wide. That was one big tree! A wood sample has been sent for radiocarbon testing to get an exact age and confirm Jeff’s belief that the canoe is Native American.




Its a big one too












Today, the canoe is being removed from the bank. The landowners have donated the canoe to the State. Texas A&M has agreed to store the dugout until we can start the conservation process. The dugout will be displayed locally once the conservation process is complete.


Louisiana Office of Cultural Development

Canoes do not survive well. This is a truely awsome find.


Pretty amazing, I am Into small craft, reminds me of the pirogue. Like others said, probably used for trade. Very awesome.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 10:51 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Shouldn't that be put in a Native American Museum somewhere?

Aftet A&M preserves it, its going to the local museum.



posted on Jun, 22 2017 @ 12:32 AM
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The white man just can't pass up the opportunity to steal a little more from the Indian.

You would have thought that they would have at least the decency to notify one of the many local tribal offices.

You know the two most favorite words in English of all modern Native Americans ? Jewish Attorney



posted on Jun, 22 2017 @ 01:07 AM
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a reply to: flatbush71

I'm sure they did, this wasnt some looting operation, Texas A&M has a top notch native american studies program.
A local tribal affiliation is not guaranteed, these water ways were heavily traveled by people of many regions and ethnicities, and for a great period of time.



posted on Jun, 22 2017 @ 06:59 AM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Great find my friend! Please keep me Updated on any new information that creeps out!



posted on Jun, 22 2017 @ 10:24 AM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: punkinworks10

Id like to know what kind of wood it is...that could explain its not rotting. For instance black locust doesnt rot even wet, and I imagine old growth would be even stronger.

Epay(spelling) has similar attributes to locust, but its from S. America, which could be intriguing as well.

Great find.


My guess would be Cyprus. It's prolific in that region, grows extremely straight and is soft enough to carve out relatively easily.

PS: It doesn't rot or deteriorate very fast.
edit on 2017-06-22T10:26:44-05:0010amThu, 22 Jun 2017 10:26:44 -0500ThursdayAmerica/Chicago4430 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2017 @ 03:24 AM
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Looks like it was intact til they tried pulling it out with a jeep



posted on Jul, 1 2017 @ 10:00 PM
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The dating for the canoe is in,


A sample of wood from the canoe has been radiocarbon dated by Beta Analytic, Inc. of Miami, FL, to determine when the canoe was made. This dating method does not identify a specific year but instead gives a range when the tree was cut down to make the canoe. The dating result indicates the canoe was made sometime between 1300 and 1420 AD



posted on Jul, 1 2017 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Thanks for the update. Do you have a link for the dating by any chance?



posted on Jul, 2 2017 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar
Sorry got sloppy

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