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Oklahoma ANG F-16 catches fire on takeoff

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posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 12:37 PM
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About 45 minutes to an hour ago, a Texas ANG F-16 pilot ejected from the aircraft at Ellington Field, near Houston. According to reports the aircraft was talking off when it caught fire, and the pilot ejected. Going by the video from the scene, the aircraft was either just airborne, and sank back onto its belly, or it departed the runway and the gear collapsed.

No word on the condition of the pilot. They were taken to a local hospital after ejecting. The airport has been evacuated while the situation is being handled.

www.houstonpress.com...

www.usnews.com...

www.click2houston.com...
edit on 6/21/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:00 PM
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NORAD statement:




posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Luckily he seems to have escaped relatively unharmed. Hopefully it was a one-off accident and not something that grounds the fleet.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Sure have been quite a lot of failures catastrophic and mundane with our jets this past year. A pattern could be emerging, maybe having nothing to do with quality control. Could sabotage explain the volume of lost jets over the past year operating outside of war??



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:06 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

It's just age. After a while attrition and wear add up. They're usually meticulously maintained and that's the only reason there aren't more accidents.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:10 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

Maintenance and funding. They're pushing off some of the required maintenance due to the operations tempo, and it's catching up to them. The Marine F-18 fleet is something like 3 years behind on Depot maintenance on the aircraft and 5 years on the engines.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

They lose too many senior maintainers because of their service limits and because civilian life is often more attractive as well. They either need to provide the training to do higher level maintenance at local facilities and take a chance with that or streamline and expand the depots to catch up.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: Caughtlurking

Over the next couple of years, the Air Force is facing a bigger crisis trying to keep maintenance around than they are pilots. They use a lot of civilian labor at the Depot level, but the units are getting hammered.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:22 PM
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They evacuated a one mile area around the scene, supposedly due to weapons being on board. I'm betting it was more because of the EPU. One mile is awfully large for an aircraft that supposedly only had live missiles on board.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Thanks for the update!
Thoughts & Prayers are with the pilot!



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:36 PM
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He had him a nice little fire burning.

mobile.twitter.com...

I'm guessing the engine caught fire, then when it fodded out, the fire went out as well.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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Had to know why the EPU is dangerous, same reason as the Me 163.....hydrazine



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: manuelram16

It was always fun when that damn thing went off. No closer than 100 yards to a building or another aircraft for a minimum of four hours.

The aircraft actually belonged to the Oklahoma ANG, and is a satellite unit operating out of Ellington.
edit on 6/21/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Expensive BBQ. Any idea on what went wrong? Closest I've been to an F-16 has been an airshow. I did see one hit a wild sow on the runway at Jacksonville International in the late 80's. Collapsed the nose gear and the pilot ejected. The plane went into the trees. They recovered it and FANG repaired it on site.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

Going by how fast the smoke quit, I'm leaning towards catastrophic engine failure. There have been a few P220 engines that threw fan blades through the oil tank over the years. Either a fan blade let go, or a hydraulic or fuel line worked loose.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
So I guess the shoes will now be on the other foot, and other countries will be cracking jokes at our air force for the lack of funding and maintenance to keep them from falling apart. Bull#!!! They can joke all they want, we can still deliver hell anywhere on Earth at a moments notice!



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

We're still flying more than many other air forces. Our pilots averaged 120 to 150 hours last year. That's down from what it used to be, but a few years ago Russian TacAir pilots were at 80 hours a year, and transports at 100.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

OUCH! As long as none of the blades went into the cockpit. I was near an A-6 that did that on a run up. The side of the aircraft looked like Swiss Cheese. Thankfully there was no fire.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

It's always fun when fan blades go. Big mess. There are a couple great shots of that F-35 in Eglin that have a couple good holes showing in them where the third stage turbine went through the fuselage.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

This is the result of another turbine blade failure.




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