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Do you think I could be an electrician?

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posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:07 PM
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I've posted a few times about looking for a career path and such, and I'm curious if I've found it.

In helping my mom build her house, the things I enjoyed the most, was the electrical parts.

Wiring outlets, lights, appliances, labeling the breakers, troubleshooting issues, changing out cords for large appliances to fit the particular outlet we had in the wall - none of this intimidated me like other skilled trade work does, and a lot of it was things I think I could keep doing, and would enjoy myself doing it.

That being said, I obviously am not well versed in a lot of the jobs electricians do, I'm sure residential wiring is just the tip of a
much larger ice berg... For one, I realize becoming an independent master electrician can take years and years..

So I'm wondering what you all think - how much more in depth does this type of job go?




posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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Union electricians make big money.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope
Absolutely you can be an electrician, and anything you choose for your future. But really, it is not us you need to be asking. You should be repeating this question to the guy in the mirror, I guarantee his answers are the most relevant and applicable to your situation.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

Ground yourself.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

You need to talk to yourself more and not pay too much attention to what strangers think of your thinking.
Really. Take yourself seriously. If you get 20 "yeas" and 2 "nays" is that going to set your course for life? Or if the opposite tally is somewhat close to that are you going to say, "Oh, darn, I think I might have liked that kind of work?"
Yep, get serious.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: Aliensun

I will put myself first in line when making life choices, but on the other hand, it's nice to know what I'm getting into. The collective experiences of others creates a fairly good template that can be generally followed, or rather be learned from as a guideline moving forward.

I don't like doing tons and tons of paperwork, for instance - someone here might tell me that an electrician does more paperwork than they spend time working with electricity (sounds ridiculous, but likely applies to some professions)



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope
That paperwork issue certainly applies to Law enforcement. Im fairly certain they spend more time on paperwork than anything else except training.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

You can be whatever you want. Don't worry about what other people say.

www.explorethetrades.org...



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:33 PM
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Its a great job, electricians will always have work, trade schools are usualy not too expensive and usualy if you get good grades you can find easy apprentiship positions, get payed to learn, up north you need to do 5 years of school, also a number of hours worked to qualify to for your certification, you should check into getting your 1st year under your belt, it should be easier to get work. At start its alot of grunt work, but the pay is usualy worth it.

Hope that helps.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

Becoming an electrician can have some shocking consequences. That being said it is one of the most highly sought after skills in all of the construction trades. Here's a list of some of the positions that you could expect to find available.

Residential wiring

Commercial building wiring

Mechanical/machine maintenance

Electrical engineering

Small electronics components and product design.

Security alarm install / access and locks

Robotics

Warehouse conveyor/ temp control


These are all positions that I guarantee you can start off at about $20 an hour. Most of them you can get on the job training or at least minimal Time spent in school.


There are some sophisticated fields of study right now in prosthetic arms, drones or any kind of remote control vehicle, In different forms of security monitoring.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

I went to a community college for HVAC. This will and has opened a number of doors.

Skilled trades still pay, because of the dangers of letting "just anyone" do dangerous work like skilled trades do leads to accidents and lawsuits. And idiots usually weed themselves out pretty quick, so there are few who can do skilled trades safely.

Community college can give you a direction.

At any modern factory you will have electricians that can trouble shoot Allen Bradley stuff-program robots-run wire-and just deal with "normal" building electrical stuff.

You can still make a wage where you can buy a house-car-vacation-afford health insurance being an electrician.

Go for it!!!



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

The electrician I knew, 90% of the work was new construction wiring.
10% was crawling through attics and basements around peoples gross homes, routing wires impossibly for no gratitude.

The way I see it- if you have to ask if people think you have what it takes to do something, you probably don't.
Nobody knows you like you do- do YOU think you could?



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:48 PM
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There are all kinds of apprenticeship programs out there.

Same with HVAC technicians, welders, plumbers.

There isn't really a solid trade out there that isn't in high demand.

Electricians probably pay the best. Union isn't always the best way to go, but in most cases union electricians do very well for themselves.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

I think that I don't know much about the job...

New construction wiring would definitely interest me.. Repair, I'd suck it up and do it anyways.

I'm getting a feel for what this career path might entail...



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: deadlyhope
a reply to: Aliensun

I will put myself first in line when making life choices, but on the other hand, it's nice to know what I'm getting into. The collective experiences of others creates a fairly good template that can be generally followed, or rather be learned from as a guideline moving forward.

I don't like doing tons and tons of paperwork, for instance - someone here might tell me that an electrician does more paperwork than they spend time working with electricity (sounds ridiculous, but likely applies to some professions)


IF you know yourself that you like working with your hands and don't mind too much that dirt, dust, heat and tight places are involved and can visualize tracing down a blueprint, then maybe you will make the grade to be an electrician.

You will know early, within two weeks if you are cut out in abilities, body strength and intelligence to handle the job. So if you fail within that two weeks as a starting apprentice, you know more about yourself than you do right at this instant. Frankly, I'm not sure you are at all that serious in this career. Push yourself and find out.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:03 PM
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I worked in the commercial field for about 8 years as electrician, got a cushy computer job now, but thinking about going back. I just miss the work, it's engaging, physically demanding, and requires a good bit critical thinking and you're doing something different everyday.

All I can tell you is, if you're really considering this as a career, get on with a commercial only contractor. In time, what you'll learn on the job will pretty much cover any residential scenario, you may later come across.

Get started with a company as a 'helper'... then get in school and the apprenticeship program early (IBEW).

Work hard, work fast, work efficiently, don't complain, don't drag your feet, or you wont last long. You're not going to be doing anything but heavy grunt work for your first few years. But it'll all pay off big time.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:07 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

Oh ya you can do it... the course takes a bit of time but its not hard work and it pays good

I managed to get through 3/4 of my electricians program, but ended up going into health care instead

Getting an apprenticeship is not easy around these parts... thats why i gave it up

Might be easier where you live though.... and its interesting work




posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:26 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

Yes. Do not go to school. Go to an electrical contractor. They will hire you to do what you're told, which in some cases will be "go out to the truck, get X and bring it back to me." They will pay for your school too. ABSOLUTELY APPRENTICESHIP HAPPENS FOR ELECTRICIANS. Good luck.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:29 PM
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originally posted by: deadlyhope
I've posted a few times about looking for a career path and such, and I'm curious if I've found it.

In helping my mom build her house, the things I enjoyed the most, was the electrical parts.

Wiring outlets, lights, appliances, labeling the breakers, troubleshooting issues, changing out cords for large appliances to fit the particular outlet we had in the wall - none of this intimidated me like other skilled trade work does, and a lot of it was things I think I could keep doing, and would enjoy myself doing it.

That being said, I obviously am not well versed in a lot of the jobs electricians do, I'm sure residential wiring is just the tip of a
much larger ice berg... For one, I realize becoming an independent master electrician can take years and years..

So I'm wondering what you all think - how much more in depth does this type of job go?


I wouldnt be asking faceless people on the internet...change the "Do you think I...." to "I'm thinking of being...."



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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My daughter is an electrical engineer, and started as an apprentice with the IBEW. (International brotherhood of Electrical Workers). She also teaches at the IBEW in Oakland. Unfortunately I would imagine it is easier as a women or minority to get an apprentice position, but you should call your local union and ask about their apprentice program. She ranked the highest in her class. So she earned it fair and square.

I would also, research on-line for sample testing and find out what areas you need to bone up on. Begin to teach yourself. Learn Learn Learn. Then go pester and watch anyone who will let you while they work.

My son is an electrician too. And even under the table makes 40 per hour. My daughter makes over 200,000 per year as an Electrical Engineer for the city of Berkeley. I have to say that their dad is also an electrician. But, hey my mayan birthday says Im an Electric White Wizard from the Northern Crossing, lol what ever that means. But the only thing electrical I can do is plug in an appliances and call one of my kids to fix stuff.



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