It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Is the sea salt from the pacific ocean safe to consume

page: 3
11
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 09:59 AM
link   

originally posted by: Dogwooddoors
Alternative to salt, I use Braggs Amino acid, alternative to soy sauce. It gets put on almost everyting I cook and enhances the flavor tremendously. It adds salt flavor with low sodium, tenderizes meats if allowed to soak in it. Yup, pink Himalayan salt for those few things I dont want Braggs in!!


That is a high tyramine chemistry. For people who can't break neurochemicals down well, they should avoid it. For those who make lots of the enzymes to break it down, they actually need the glutamates and other tyramine chemistry or they get cranky. More people need tyramines than those who don't in the world. For me, I have all three of the gene mutations that mean I do not make much of the enzymes to break down aged food chemistry. So I can eat them occasionally but not often. I used to get a lot of headaches from tyramines, now I very rarely get one because I have cut way down.




posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 10:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: MichiganSwampBuck
An interesting question to be sure. I used to take iodine supplements in the form of kelp. I took it daily during Chernobyl, then again during Fukushima. After Fukushima I began considering this pretty hard and stopped taking kelp supplements for iodine.

I've been wondering what would be the harm of using halite salt mined here in Michigan as I would assume that salt from the ancient seas would be more less pollution free, but being buried underground for so long, other minerals and contaminates could be in ancient sea salt. It makes me wonder how it could be purified if it is contaminated. I would assume that the mined salt is a source of much of our table salt.

As far as iodine is concerned, few foods contain much of it and kelp is an excellent source, but as polluted as all the modern oceans are, radiation would be only a single concern regarding the potential health effects of ocean based food products.


The salt from Lower Michigan Detroit area mines has a lot of bromide in it. It made people sick and a long time ago the government passed laws because of Detroit salt to refine salt to make sure it was more pure. If you ever wondered why they passed those laws, research this. I do not know why the bromide levels were so high there in that area.

Bromide got a bad name. It is naturally in all sea salt, in areas where it is high it isn't good for you. But a little is good for you. Shrimp and oysters are high in it. Bromide actually settles people, so does Iodine. Chloride and flouride actually increase our energy level. Fluoride is actually a little too strong, so it triggers us to pee. Bromide is also found in Rutabaggas. It settles people when they eat rutabagga. It does not trigger the thyroid like iodine does to balance the adrenal gland, but a little bromide actually helps our DNA repair mechanism to work properly if I remember right.

Just so you know that the level of bromide in Detroit raw salt is a little too high.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 10:28 AM
link   

originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: rickymouse

Isn't it packaged?
Food has to say where it comes from.
Look on the package. Or is this sold from a bulk barrel or something?
I just finished a box of sea salt so I can't look to see where it comes from but it was Morton's Sea Salt.
This link talks about harvesting ponds near the San Francisco bay. I imagine the water comes from the Pacific.

www.thekitchn.com...




It may say on the little tag on the bulk container. I should look at that or ask again. There are a lot of health conscientious people running the Marquette food coop, they are kind of picky. I actually talk to the workers quite a bit when I go there, I ask them questions and also will clarify properties of food with them and tell them about chemistry in foods that is good and bad and how much they contain. They are really interested, my wife gets embarrassed, she does not realize that these people are food nuts like me and want to learn important properties of food. I used to belong to a coop in Hancock before, when they were not popular, when most people believed commercially grown food was safe. I had a life time membership there back in the seventies, I now belong to the one here.

I started researching food because it is a challenge. Most people do not look at both good and bad qualities and genetic factors. But then again, they are working, I spend at least six hours a day researching what I do, I used to spend around eight to ten hours. Been doing this for over eight years now, my eyes are suffering from researching things.

Back in my earlier years eating organic, I knew a lot of strange health nuts, sort of Hippy types. I ate chocolate covered ants and cleaned night crawlers to use in a spaghetti type dish. They were both actually pretty good, I never thought chocolate covered ants would taste like chocolate covered raisins. I actually had a hard time getting my wife to believe organic foods tasted better. Till she actually tasted them. Now she is hooked, especially on the ketchup.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 12:33 AM
link   
a reply to: Lagomorphe

Yes: we sometimes use fleur-de-sel, but don't know which brand.

Of course: did lick the cooking-slab, and even licked the rock-crystal lamp... more than once...


The tongue is an excellent way to explore the physical universe!



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 12:38 AM
link   
a reply to: Nothin

Interesting, I didn't know there were salt cooking slabs, how do you like it? It goes in the oven or how does it work? Would you recommend it?
edit on 21-6-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: Nothin

Interesting, I didn't know there were salt cooking slabs, how do you like it? It goes in the oven or how does it work? Would you recommend it?


Hi D8Tee.
It adds a very natural-tasting light saltiness to the food. Steak, shrimp, salmon, all very nice.
It can go in the oven, or on the side of the BBQ, but not exposed to direct flame, because it need to be heated-up slowly.
Recommended indeed! (No specific brand recommendation though).

Salt-block cooking,



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:26 AM
link   

originally posted by: Nothin
a reply to: Lagomorphe

Yes: we sometimes use fleur-de-sel, but don't know which brand.

Of course: did lick the cooking-slab, and even licked the rock-crystal lamp... more than once...


The tongue is an excellent way to explore the physical universe!


If it's fleur de sel and has a label with AOC on it then it is definately from Gironde in France. Although other French coastal places harvest it too.

I lived by Fleur de sel until I got REALLY decent pricing on Austrian and Himalayan mined salt rocks, granulate and powdered salt.

A colleagues wife imports it so I get it for next to nothing. (Have about 20 kg of each at the moment)

Great taste and when mixed with dehydrated powdered celery even Greater...

Warmest

Lags



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 06:29 AM
link   
Even though there is one Pacific ocean there are probably good and bad places to harvest it.



new topics

top topics



 
11
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join