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Why is Space black? What does nothingness look like?

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posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 09:56 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

I'm asking are there other properties of space that make it black besides being the absence of light from human perspective.




posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: game over man

So that what works??? You're not making any sense.

The universe still works if we aren't looking at it. There are plenty of places in the universe that we don't see at all. Are you suggesting that they stop working because we aren't looking at them???

I honestly don't understand what you're trying to say.

Space is black, or better yet it's Dark, because visible light isn't being reflected for us to see anything there. Or at least not enough for it to register with our eyes. But what do you mean it won't work unless we see it in black. The darkness of space is just dark because the visible light isn't hitting something for us to see.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 10:24 PM
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a reply to: game over man

Yes.

Mater that can absorb or block light.

It's summer here in the Northern Hemisphere, and what's great about that is: on a crystal clear night, in a dark area, you can see the Milky Way galaxy quite well as during this time of the year, our night sky is facing towards the center of our galaxy.

Now, if you look, you'll notice that there are black looking areas that do not have anywhere near the amount of stars:



We see that because there are large amounts of dust that are actually blocking the light. You can see it quite well in the image I took above.

Take a look at this image I made of the Flame Nebulae:



The redish/orange nebula seems to have something dark splitting it....and it does. It's dark dust and gas that is blocking the light towards us.

Take a look at this galaxy. Notice the dark material that is blocking some of it's light:



Why does it look black? Again: blocking or absorbing light, is the absence of light.......which to our eyes is the color black.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 10:40 PM
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originally posted by: mOjOm
a reply to: game over man

So that what works??? You're not making any sense.

The universe still works if we aren't looking at it.


That is not true! You have to look at space to know it even exists. How do you know how it's working, you wouldn't know if you hadn't discovered it, tested it, and proved it. You already know how the Universe works, or at least you think you do...and in this conversation you're cheating by saying the Universe was always working the way it always has only based off your understanding of the Universe now.

You understand our understanding of the Universe is constantly evolving? At one point in human civilization people were debating, the Earth has always been in the center of the Universe, and that is how it's always worked! So I'm asking is there more to the blackness of the Universe rather than the only answer of it's the absence of light. I feel it could be more than one reason.

In this thread when I've mentioned that, other posters have said well it's not just black, there are lots of colors we're not seeing such as heat, radio, and infrared waves...so what does the Universe really look like? Or is still black and is there a reason of structure or efficiency for the Universe to appear black other than being absence of life? There is nothing else in the Universe that benefits from space being black besides our eyes?



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Well here on Earth black has many uses and properties other than being the absence of light. So I'm wondering if the Universe is the same.

Doesn't space move faster than light? Isn't that what the big bang is all about? Space was accelerating faster than light so what color was space then? Because it couldn't have matched the color of nothingness before the big bang surrounding the point of singularity. The color of nothing is incomprehensible because it is impossible for us to understand nothingness. Unless you think if you pass the edge of the Universe there would be more blackness?



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 11:00 PM
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a reply to: game over man



ou have to look at space to know it even exists.


Not quite true.

A blind person knows space exists as long as they can move through it. Just as they know music exists without having to read sheet music: they can hear it.

One can learn a lot about something without ever directly observing it.

Take electricity for example: electrical current is electrons moving......and humans were experimenting with electricity, and even developing things that use electricity for a very, very long time without once anyone having ever directly observed an electron.

Nuclear power: again, we spend a lot of time experimenting and even creating devices that showed nuclear power existed without having once laid eyes on an atom. We split it just fine, as the math said it was there.

You can look at a map of thick forest and know where a river is.....without ever seeing the river. Why? Why because the trees on the banks of that small river will be much more lush and larger than the trees away from it, and will follow the course of the river. So you know there is one there, without having to directly observe it.

As for "what does the universe actually look like?" that really depends:

What are you using to look at it with? Your eyes? A camera? A radio dish?

Is space black just for our benefit?

Of course not. Do you think your fridge is dark inside once you close the door just to benefit your eyes? No.....it gets dark because when you close the door, a switch turns the light out. And it would look black in there......because of the absence of light.

Now....put a thermal camera in there and you'll see something different.....but again, the only reason you would see something different is because we made a camera to show us something our eyes can't see on their own.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 11:00 PM
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a reply to: game over man

Space and the stuff in it still exist when we aren't looking at it. Blind people can't see space but it's still there even if they can't see it.

Just like the food in your fridge is still there when the doors closed. Here's an experiment even. Go to the Fridge with your eyes closed so you can't see in there and open the door and reach inside. You'll find that your food is still there even when your aren't looking at it.

Look I get it. You want to somehow link the blackness of space to being some kind of proof of God. But you're not making much sense and you seem to be fishing for something and making up stuff and ignoring simple facts.

Also, I was one of the posters who first said that space is full of other types of energy which we just can't see but is still there. When you ask, "What does the Universe really look like?" That is kind of a meaningless question without including from what perspective. It looks like what it looks like depending upon what is viewing it. For us it looks like it is. To something which sees in a different spectrum it will look different. We can only "See" what we can "See" and that is limited to the Visible spectrum. So that is what it looks like to us.

We see Black because our Visible spectrum which includes all the colors is from White Light. When you use a prism you can split our visible spectrum of White Light into all the colors of the rainbow which account for the colors we see. Black, or Darkness of space is the lack of that White Light which is black. Why it's that way is because it just is. I don't know why you think it's so special though. If it was something else you'd think that was just as normal as you think it is now.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 11:16 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Dude you are tripping me out because you keep using similar examples as me. Even the fridge example. But I didn't read your post before posting mine. I was in the middle of writing mine when you made yours and only read yours after I posted.

Get out of my mind man!!!! It's freaky!!!



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 11:19 PM
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a reply to: game over man

First: you need to understand what "color" is, it's what we see in the visible spectrum of light, and electromagnetic energy.

that's a very narrow bandwidth.

You can't describe what the color of gamma rays are, because we can't see them with just our eyes. That's how that works. You could just randomly think up the name of some color.....but then that would be you just making something up. There is no visible way to see it naturally. Instead, we have to use visible colors to represent something we can't normally see.

In order for us to see color, we need photons from the light of the visible spectrum. Without those photons, we would not see anything, and the absence of seeing something due to the lack of photons makes us see: Black.

That's how that works.

Prior to the first stars, there were no photons in the visible light spectrum. No light in the visible spectrum means: black.

If you had a time machine and went back to just before the first stars were formed, that's what the universe would look like to your eyes: black, and nothing else.

This is the point that many have been trying to explain to you: nothingness looks black because nothing means no visible light. No visible light registers as black to our senses.

Is that what the color of space truly is?

Sure....for us, and how we define color and light.

For some other alien species out there, who have eyes that developed in a much lower light level, their visible spectrum might go lower in the infrared area....meaning they'd have other colors that they can see, that we can't.

We describe the world around us based upon our senses, and have common terms for certain things so that we can understand each other.

When I say "It was as black as space.", most people will understand what I mean, and that's because we use common terms, and that they understand that I'm saying something looks black due to the absence of light or anything else, something that is very empty by most standards.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 12:05 AM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

The reason we see the universe in color is simple we adapted to see it that way. Are eyes don't see color they see frequencies. Are mind interprets this as colors.

The reason black exists is simple our brain doesn't see any frequency of light. So are brain being very smart simply pick's up the frequencies around black and use that information to form an image.

Now just because light doesn't reflect off something doesn't mean it's not there does it. Now if any other color was used our vision wouldn't work at all. Go into a dark room imagine if we saw no light as blue you would walk in to a room and everything would be blue. Now imagine if there was a blue chair you wouldn't see it.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 01:42 AM
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posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:30 AM
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a reply to: game over man


I know trust me I completely understand. I just want a more serious answer of why space is black besides it's the absence of light.

It hasn’t got anything to do with space, really. It’s about how your brain processes information from your senses.

Visible light is a special form of what is known as electromagnetic radiation. Other examples of EM radiation are radio waves, microwaves, X-rays and gamma rays. They differ from light in one important way: we can’t see them.

What makes light visible and these other forms of EM radiation invisible? It depends on their wavelength — or, to put it another way, their frequency. Only waves within a certain narrow band of frequencies can be seen by human eyes. This is visible light.

Different frequencies of light register on our brains as different colours. Low-frequency light is red. Slightly higher-frequency light is orange. And so on all the way up through the rainbow till we come to violet light, which is the highest visible frequency of all.

The colours are in our brains, not in the world outside. In that physical world, there are simply different frequencies of light, and no ‘colours’ at all. ‘Red’, ‘green’, etc., are just names for different frequencies (wavelengths) of light.

When there is no light to be seen, our brains perceive no colours. They perceive an absence of light, which we call darkness.

Darkness, too, has a colour in our brains — sort of. That colour is black.

How did this happen? It is how evolution has formed our brains and our senses. Perhaps God was responsible; that question doesn’t really interest me very much. But whether He was or not, the colours we see are not attributes of the outside world, but a mental model of those attributes.

The colours are all in your head.

And mine.

And everybody’s.


edit on 20/6/17 by Astyanax because: of invisible Illuminati



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 03:36 AM
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a reply to: game over man


How would the colors come from nothingness and naturally and instantly be the color that they are, with no human's to observe it? How do you explain that?

They didn’t. They weren’t. There were no colours till there were people.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: game over man

A form of meditation uses imagining black velvet while concentrating and going within the "blackness, darkness of no color".

Another analogy which supports a "no-color" explanation would be to stand in a room with no windows, at night, with no lighting, and you cant see your hand in front of you.

So what "color" of a place are you standing within that "nothingness"? It is a void and de-void of any discernible colors. Nothing from nothing equals nothing.

No reflection, no absorbing, no impressions...just...nothing....colorwise. Nothingness needs nothing to make it visibly "nothing".



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Absolutely. I agree. I have a blind friend whom I asked once how he knows when to go to sleep? And if he can dream while awake...as his life is always "black" and devoid of color.

He says his sense of his own circadian rhythm is out of whack most of the time, and 50-50% he has trouble going to and staying asleep. Its always completely dark and black and without any color...just...nothing.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 10:04 AM
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What does a blind person see?

What does a deaf person hear?

Thats right, not "black" or "some hum", just nothing.


If you could see deep infrared, the "black" background of space would be filled with a glow - microwave background radiation, coming from the big bang!
I don't know if someone already mentioned this, I guess you guys did, but as this discussion seems to carry on forever, I wanted to give it another possible stop-point to think about by the OP.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 01:55 AM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope


What does a blind person see?

What does a deaf person hear?

Thats right, not "black" or "some hum", just nothing.

Sadly, this is not the case.

An artist who went blind in middle age told me before he died that he experienced almost continuous visual hallucinations afterwards. I believe him, although I am not sure how common such cases are.

Many deaf people are affected by tinnitus and other aural hallucinations.



posted on Jun, 22 2017 @ 03:29 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

Wow, that sounds awful!
Okay, I read this from a girl blind from birth on, and she just has no visual input whatever.



posted on Jun, 22 2017 @ 04:55 AM
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But space iant black. You can see light everywhere. Stars. Planets the sun. What youre not seeing is light scattering off of fine particles and atoms like in our atmosphere. Look at something eminating light (a star) or reflecting it (a planet or moon) or even a nebula and you can clearly see there is plenty of light.



posted on Jun, 22 2017 @ 04:57 AM
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a reply to: game over man

In the absence of light darkness prevails.


Expansion is the ticket as to why space appears black.
edit on 22-6-2017 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)







 
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