It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

DNA test: Why shouldn't I do this?

page: 1
11
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:03 PM
link   
So, I'm adopted. I've met my biological mother, the whole family and relatives are extremely healthy people, no serious conditions, so on and so forth.

I don't even know my biological fathers name, and I've inherited Allergies and Asthma from him. Fun...

I want to do a DNA test for 1) Hidden Medical Possibilities and 2) ethnic background, just because I'm curious.

However! I am a member of ATS, and am super suspicious that my DNA will be on record, ready for governments to steal away, so on and so forth.

Hell, What if I decide to become a raging criminal in a few years! what then!!! just kidding about that one. Nevertheless, I'd rather not have my DNA available.

Here's an excerpt from the AncestryDNA website:




How secure and private is AncestryDNA?

Your privacy is important to us. We use industry standard security practices to store your DNA sample, your DNA test results, and other personal data you provide to us. In addition, we store your DNA test results and DNA sample without your name or other common identifying information. You own your DNA data. At any time, you can choose to download raw DNA data, have us delete your DNA test results as described in the AncestryDNA Privacy Statement, or have us destroy your physical DNA saliva sample. We do not share with third parties your name or other common identifying information linked to your genetic data, except as legally required or with your explicit consent.

link

Still kind of hard to believe them.

Does anyone here know of any cases where 'whomever' was given access to these major DNA collector companies?

Has anyone ever done one of these tests? even if it was just for Ancestry (what were your results?)


edit on 18/6/17 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:07 PM
link   
After they collect it they send it to the cloning labs where they use it to grow food for the alien overlords .



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:08 PM
link   
a reply to: VengefulGhost

I can accept this outcome.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: Ghost147
So, I'm adopted. I've met my biological mother, the whole family and relatives are extremely healthy people, no serious conditions, so on and so forth.

I don't even know my biological fathers name, and I've inherited Allergies and Asthma from him. Fun...

I want to do a DNA test for 1) Hidden Medical Possibilities and 2) ethnic background, just because I'm curious.

However! I am a member of ATS, and am super suspicious that my DNA will be on record, ready for governments to steal away, so on and so forth.

Hell, What if I decide to become a raging criminal in a few years! what then!!! just kidding about that one. Nevertheless, I'd rather not have my DNA available.

Does anyone here know of any cases where 'whomever' was given access to these major DNA collector companies?

Has anyone ever done one of these tests? even if it was just for Ancestry (what were your results?)



If the government really wanted your dna they'd have it. Via blood work at the Dr's office... go for it if you'd wish to know. Who cares if the government has your dna, if they wanted you dead you'd be dead.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:21 PM
link   
This DNA graph will be copied, given to the government, and sold to a database network corporation whom will use this info to make big bucks on insurance companies, or anyone looking for data on YOU. ...or it could be a set up of who's who when the mothership comes for their experiments...either way your donating or your dinner.....



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:24 PM
link   
I wouldn't worry about it.

There was a big push back for a DNA information warehouse around the early '90s ... and this was mostly a financial musical chairs type of thing.

I promise you this, your DNA may be unique, but it is very unlikely that it is 'special'.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:27 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

I think that your DNA being stolen, should be the least of your worries in life.

If someone really wanted your DNA,
They would take a snip of your hair from your tube drain when you aren't home.
Follow you around and wait till you spit on the ground, our use a public toilet.
Things like that.
Don't be paranoid.
If you were truly important enough that the Gov or some Magen you wanted your DNA, they would have gotten it from your health records years ago.

You have had blood drawn at some point in your life haven't you?
Your already out there my friend.
The cogs are already turning and the major incident your about to be framed for is already setting on stage.
Jk, hahah!
But honestly stop being paranoid.
Don't let irrational fears control your life.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: Ghost147
So, I'm adopted. I've met my biological mother, the whole family and relatives are extremely healthy people, no serious conditions, so on and so forth.

I don't even know my biological fathers name, and I've inherited Allergies and Asthma from him. Fun...

I want to do a DNA test for 1) Hidden Medical Possibilities and 2) ethnic background, just because I'm curious.

However! I am a member of ATS, and am super suspicious that my DNA will be on record, ready for governments to steal away, so on and so forth.

Hell, What if I decide to become a raging criminal in a few years! what then!!! just kidding about that one. Nevertheless, I'd rather not have my DNA available.

Here's an excerpt from the AncestryDNA website:




How secure and private is AncestryDNA?

Your privacy is important to us. We use industry standard security practices to store your DNA sample, your DNA test results, and other personal data you provide to us. In addition, we store your DNA test results and DNA sample without your name or other common identifying information. You own your DNA data. At any time, you can choose to download raw DNA data, have us delete your DNA test results as described in the AncestryDNA Privacy Statement, or have us destroy your physical DNA saliva sample. We do not share with third parties your name or other common identifying information linked to your genetic data, except as legally required or with your explicit consent.

link

Still kind of hard to believe them.

Does anyone here know of any cases where 'whomever' was given access to these major DNA collector companies?

Has anyone ever done one of these tests? even if it was just for Ancestry (what were your results?)



They could replace you with a programmed clone and harvest your comatose body for spare parts.

It happens to me that way, every other week. Thank goodness there is now an army of me to fight them back.




posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:43 PM
link   
According to several articles, Ancestry.com's dna database has been used to search for family relationships to dna left at a crime scene in at least one case. I am on mobile and can't upload the links, but do a search for Angie Dodge murder investigation. I first heard about this on a show on Discovery ID.
edit on 6/18/2017 by Pillywiggin because: Spelling



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:43 PM
link   
Well if you think you might commit a crime or be innocently caught up in one. I would never trust police can't request the records. Ancestry isn't known as an honest company,

I don't think the ancestry can provide medical results. Might want to try another company for that. My daughters have done it with ancestry and it gave results like Europe west which did not specify which country. You get the pie chart in percentages like Irish, British Isies ( this includes Scotland) , or let's say you are American Indian, that is in there. Ireland was the only result in the pie nailing it down to one country. The rest is all vague


The ad on TV where he says I thought I was German, turns out I'm Scottish, traded in my ledanhosen for a kilt is complete BS! You would only know East or west Europe or British isles
I've seen a few results and they're all pretty much the same, Irish, English,Iberian peninsula (Spain, Portugal), scandanavia
edit on 18-6-2017 by violet because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-6-2017 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: Pillywiggin
According to several articles, Ancestry.com's dna database has been used to search for family relationships to dna left at a crime scene in at least one case. I am on mobile and can't upload the links, but do a search for Angie Dodge murder investigation. I first heard about this on a show on Discovery ID.

True yes. I did a Thread on it
edit on 18-6-2017 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 09:53 PM
link   
My ancestry is a little vague.
I know there are a few bad boys in the lineage.
A famous gunslinger, a notorious bank robber, a renegade Cherokee that fled murder charges.
There's a good helping of Irish and German in the mix.
To quote the great philosopher, Popeye the Sailor Man,
"I yam what I yam."



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 10:10 PM
link   
I've had my DNA tested with a few companies while looking for my biological father (I found him). I have no regrets, except wishing I had done it sooner. Go for it! You deserve to know where you come from. Good luck in your search.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 10:30 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

Unless you plan on reverse decontamination technology and plan on avoiding leaving any DNA lying around.. which is impossible.. I think your cool lol.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 11:17 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

Send your DNA to a trusted source in another country. Use a friends credit card for the transaction. (ask them first, don't steal it
)

Use a fake name on all of the paper records. Job done.

Don't use a US company and besides, it would cost too much. Try Iceland for example.

P



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 11:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

Like others, I believe if govt wants your DNA they will have it. Not to say they can't get it otherwise if you put it out there.
I struggled with this a long time but finally did it in 2013 hoping to find my adopted father's family. Then my brother did it as well after doing ydna he did autosomal as I had done. So turns out we were half siblings. Took about a year and half doing multiple trees from others, till I finaly got a match to 2nd ggparents. Wasn't too hard from there. This year got confirmation that my suspected Dad was indeed my dad.

I went through dnaadoption.com to learn how to do it. I also started with no name but it can be done.

Depends on your desire to know vs your fear.

Best wishes and if you decide to do this please feel free to contac me.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 11:45 PM
link   
My daughter gave me one for Mothers Day this year. I debated just as you, but I decided to go ahead with it. For the same reasons that others have posted. IF someone wanted it for nefarious purposes, they could get it in any number of ways. I've had so many medical procedures done, it would be a piece of cake, and I also have some frozen embryos that are left over from my IVF procedure to have my boys. That was 15 years ago, before I joined this site, lol. What's done is done. Besides, I'm not at all special enough for anyone to care about my DNA. So, I did it. Still waiting to find out the results, but they should come soon.

On a little side note, I know someone that did do it, and found a half brother she didn't know she had. THAT was a little family secret her mom didn't want to come to light!

I say do it, if you're curious. It might give you some answers.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 11:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

It's the highest honor to pass through the digestive systems of the alien overlords.



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 11:54 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

Is Ancestry a preferable option to having it done by a medical lab recommended by your doctor? I didn't even know Ancestry offered that. Though I saw a commercial for another company doing it a little while back.
As far as privacy, the mandate to digitize American medical records makes access to anyone's info potentially effortless with the right logins. But is Ancestry subject to those regulations regarding your DNA? Avoiding identifiable data with your sample sounds great, but they are also not subject to doctor-patient confidentiality rules, I wouldn't think.

Sorry for the rambling trip to nothing. I've just had serious reservations about submitting my unique genetic information to a company who was barely accurate with my family tree 10 years ago. Seems like OJ giving the LAPD his glove size just in case he decided to start dating...



posted on Jun, 18 2017 @ 11:56 PM
link   
a reply to: liveandlearn

angie dodge link www.cbsnews.com...

I saw that show and this is an amazing story!!! explains how ancestry.com got involed, a few really BIG coincidences.....



new topics

top topics



 
11
<<   2 >>

log in

join