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University of Michigan to offer free tuition for Michigan residents with income less than $65K

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posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:22 PM
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My youngest daughter is currently working on her bachelor's degree in psychology. She has taken a semester off, since she is working 3 jobs to save money to try to keep the cost of her loans down. Her first 2 years were easier due to her having more scholarships and grants available. She is very dedicated in researching writing multiagency essays and winning those limited grants and scholarships.

Obviously, I am quite proud of her. She collects our refundables and others to help pay for her books rentals and / or if needed to purchase books, she has always resold them to ensure she can buy the next semester's books.

My husband average income is $70,000...we hurt her FIFA grant requests currently. It is frustrating. I am happy about this news though. Believe me, outside of the major cities, $65,000 in Michigan is a decent livable income. Most think we make 3x more than we do. Relatives in California think we are rich. Haha...even friends who do make $200,000 think we make more than them. They don't realize that we have no credit cards and save our money so that we can buy our stuff outright. Any emergency loans are done on our 401(k) to ourselves and paid off to ourselves within 3 years...rather than an outside creditor lender.

Omg! I am getting so far off topic. Going to go to bed. Basic take away...Kudos to Michigan University!




posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:28 PM
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originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: MotherMayEye

In my uneducated opinion, if the tuition prices were at a somewhat fair rate, then there wouldn't be a need for a program such as this. Or perhaps there would be an equitable payscale based on income combined with grades.


Well, nearly any tuition is too much for the poor. Tuition, these days, is too much for the middle class even.

And I don't think that the wealthy should bear all the brunt either.

Education is nearly the only thing that I think taxes should be spent liberally on. And a tax bracket type scale is how I would like to see this handled.

I am not so charmed by this now. I want to see free higher education, but not based on a tuition increase for middle class families.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

Earning what is yours is in getting your degree and putting in the work not in loans/money that isn't yours to begin with and puts you in debt for life.

I think this is a great idea.
edit on 6/15/2017 by 3NL1GHT3N3D1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye




Well, nearly any tuition is too much for the poor. Tuition, these days, is too much for the middle class even.


I disagree. My thinking is that if you feel the need to go to a university, you can apply the ethic to working for the money. That's not to say that I don't think it's expensive, because I do. Also not to be confused with certain knowledge that we shouldn't have to pay for. Those are different discussions.


Now you can see why I also said that I'm of two minds on it. I'm just not smart enough to solve the issue.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1

Disagree. Higher learning is a privilege (which I don't necessarily agree with) at the moment. Why does one who makes 64k/year get a free ride while one who makes 66k/year doesn't? For starters, the one who makes 66k/year is paying more for the same education as last year.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

I found myself to be married and a mom at age 20. Then I figured out I wanted to go back to school and it was difficult to fanagle working to pay for school with a family of my own.

I took out student loans to pay. And I am still under the weight of them 20 years later.

But I graduated and with a 3.9 GPA.

I don't think 18-20 year olds should only get one shot at life and a higher education and if they aren't in a position to put income into tuition, then too bad for them. To be honest, I think that would be grossly unfair to young parents....especially single parents who could really benefit from free tuition.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:47 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

If the school is going to do that, they should require that the students work in the state.

That way they could capture the "loss" with increased state revenue.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Smart idea. Michigan could really benefit from that type of system, too.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye

I'm not in favor of it, but it's not like I can make the decisions for the state.

But if they ARE going to do it, do it in a way that will benefit the state and EVERYONE living and working there.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:55 PM
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originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1

Disagree. Higher learning is a privilege (which I don't necessarily agree with) at the moment. Why does one who makes 64k/year get a free ride while one who makes 66k/year doesn't? For starters, the one who makes 66k/year is paying more for the same education as last year.


Here's the thing I haven't been thinking about...a parent can stop claiming their child as a dependent and save a lot of money on tuition (at the University of Michigan) by doing that. What 18-20 year old makes $64,000/year?

It would not be difficult or unreasonable to get around the $64,000/year threshold by cutting your child free from being a dependent when they entered college.

edit on 15-6-2017 by MotherMayEye because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 09:56 PM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye

I couldn't afford college. Found out the hard way after one year. Got into the trades instead.

I actually have a completely different view on the traditional education model.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

My opinion is that after high school, young adults should be propelled into the work force. As many different jobs they can do for a few years while the figure out what they want to do. All the while saving for their tuition. It's one of my bucketlist ideas to arrange that...so nonyall better steal my idea!



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I don't believe its the state that is soaking up the loss. The school is raising tuition to compensate.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:05 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

Then it's just an entitlement program.

Stupid, in my opinion.

If I were to do it, I'd make it open to any student, regardless of parents wages and contract them to work in the state 2 years for every year of free school.

And the schooling would only be "free" if they studied science, tech, medicine, business.

And they'd have to pay back the tuition if they went out of state.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

I was thinking that in-state tuition was more affordable (like most state colleges) and so the college would ultimately benefit (and make up losses) from a commitment to work there.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Exactly. The cost is moved to all those families who make 65k+/year. Not to mention the free advertising and positive public image.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:08 PM
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originally posted by: MotherMayEye

originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1

Disagree. Higher learning is a privilege (which I don't necessarily agree with) at the moment. Why does one who makes 64k/year get a free ride while one who makes 66k/year doesn't? For starters, the one who makes 66k/year is paying more for the same education as last year.


Here's the thing I haven't been thinking about...a parent can stop claiming their child as a dependent and save a lot of money on tuition (at the University of Michigan) by doing that. What 18-20 year old makes $64,000/year?

It would not be difficult or unreasonable to get around the $64,000/year threshold by cutting your child free from being a dependent when they entered college.


BTW, yes, I know this is a legal loophole. But people would be foolish to not use it.

The tax savings of declaring your college-aged student as a dependent is minimal compared to free tuition.

And, TBH, this is the method I use to keep my student loan payment affordable. I file separately from my husband.
edit on 15-6-2017 by MotherMayEye because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: JinMI

The school wouldn't even have to raise tuition if they partnered with corporations who could move there with a large pool of qualified new workers.

The state could kick in and lower tax rates for the corporations.

Hell, the school could improve services and lower tuition costs and it could be a new age for Michigan.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye

That would be the break. Keeping insurance/housing or cheaper tuition. Depends on where the greater costs lie.

I wouldn't sway anyone from trying to get the "entitlement" while it lasts. I have no dog in the fight, but I don't have to agree with it.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:12 PM
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Where are they planning on housing the thousands of new students?
Speaking of housing, is that free too or is this just tuition?
Free,,,, subsidized



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Trades, engineering and medical are really picking up here. You're very much on the right path.




Hell, the school could improve services and lower tuition costs and it could be a new age for Michigan.


That makes sense but since it would cause loss of profit, it won't happen IMO.



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