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Index of Texas Archaeology

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posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 12:26 AM
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So... if you've ever wondered what it might be like to go on an archaeological dig, there's a bunch of Texans who have made their papers available for perusal.

From their site:


The ITA is your source for open access archaeological reports from projects conducted throughout the State of Texas. The digital reports can be read on this site or downloaded to your computer at no cost. All authors retain, at minimum, a Creative Commons Attribution license to their work, meaning that they, and in some instances the funding agency, must be credited for original creation.

Licensing information can be found on the cover page for each report. All reports are organized by year (Volume No.), and can be accessed using the drop down menu in the right column.

Index of Texas Archaeology


So I entered the term 'mammoth' and found a few papers on the mammoths... and a LOT of papers on the paleoIndians here, who hunted the mammoths.

Perhaps your state has something similar?




posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 01:10 AM
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Cool, I netted giant human skeleton and it hit one

That's a Texas party school



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: Byrd

Very interesting!

I have relatives in Texas who actually discovered a mammoth on their property and had it professionally excavated. It would be neat if I could find their mammoth in those records.



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 02:24 AM
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Texas is a strange place and always will be. So many anomolies in regard to time scale, they were debunked, now only to reside on conspiracy sites such as these. Question is, why the need to disprove such things in such succinct​ fashion?

We are like the Russia of the US continent. The hammer never happened... There are no human footprints coinciding with those of dinosaur's. However, the history remains rich, and if you look for it in person, it whispers it's unbelievable tale in your ear across the eons to the present time.

You will never find it in the computer screen.
edit on 15-6-2017 by Bobaganoosh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: GBP/JPY

Everything is bigger in Texas!

Good op



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: Bobaganoosh

The Texas Hammer.... One of the biggest overlooked mysteries IMO...



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 12:34 PM
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I'll check this out, for next time I visit...



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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originally posted by: Ameilia
a reply to: Byrd

Very interesting!

I have relatives in Texas who actually discovered a mammoth on their property and had it professionally excavated. It would be neat if I could find their mammoth in those records.


Where and when was the discovery? I worked on a mammoth last year!



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

All my life I would have jumped at the chance to dig
in the earth under someone with the knowledge. Someone who
could just point me in the right direction of Jim Bowies knife
or Santanas sword. Wouldn't matter I'd dig my lily white ass off
Byrd.



posted on Jun, 20 2017 @ 10:12 PM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: Ameilia
a reply to: Byrd

Very interesting!

I have relatives in Texas who actually discovered a mammoth on their property and had it professionally excavated. It would be neat if I could find their mammoth in those records.


Where and when was the discovery? I worked on a mammoth last year!


This was about 20 years ago!



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 04:46 AM
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Long as we dont have another Trex called "Sue" incidents.



posted on Jun, 21 2017 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: Blackfinger
Long as we dont have another Trex called "Sue" incidents.


We'd like to find one. Likeliest spot is in West Texas, near Big Bend where a friend of mine found some T-rex bones (yes, verified and part of our museum collection.)

I have been cleared to work on a dig this summer (volunteer one day a week) - it should be spectacularly hot. We'll start digging about 7:30-8 am and go till noon. It'll be too hot to dig in the afternoon. It's an 80 mile round trip for me, but ... hey, I get to dig in the dirt for dinosaurs!

(I've volunteered at the site for several years. Usually I find dirt. Once I found a small bone and once a piece of turtle shell. But lots and lots of dirt.)

BTW, this dig is paleontology rather than archaeology (Archaeology looks for "The Ark of the Covenant", Paleontology looks for "pale, dead dinosaurs")
edit on 21-6-2017 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



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